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(Wimp)   Just some BS propaganda perpetuated by the poors. Nah, just kidding. Anyone who has delivered pizzas to rich neighborhoods and trailer parks already knew this   (wimp.com) divider line 88
    More: Sappy  
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7116 clicks; posted to Video » on 14 Jul 2014 at 5:44 PM (9 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-14 03:40:58 PM
Wow. That made me think.

I never realized hipsters would mooch off of homeless people.

How very wrong I was.
 
2014-07-14 04:14:58 PM
that was really dumb.

it doesn't prove anything, it doesn't mean anything.

there's nothing deep or thought-provoking about it.

it comes across as trite.

christ what a dumb waste of everything.
 
2014-07-14 04:55:11 PM
When I was driving pizzas my best tips came from the smaller low-end detached housing. Trailer Parks were always scraping nickels together to reach the total, and the huge houses didn't tip at all.
 
2014-07-14 05:27:52 PM
If a toolbox who looked like that came up to me in a pizza joint, I wouldn't give him any pizza, either.  If someone who looked like the homeless guy asked me for pizza in a pizza joint, I'd give him a slice.  Sometimes you gotta look the part.
 
2014-07-14 05:46:22 PM
Well of course he gave up a slice. He's not going to finish it and it's not going to keep forever. Oh yeah, and IT WAS FREE.
 
2014-07-14 05:55:27 PM
Not enough sample set to make any definitive conclusion about anything.
 
2014-07-14 06:00:59 PM
No wonder he's homeless, no resource management skills at all.
 
2014-07-14 06:07:48 PM
The whole production was staged to get the reactions and result desired by the, ahem, "producers" of the video.

First a couple.  We aren't shown the size the of pizza they'd paid for and dickhead was asking for some of it.  Maybe it was a small or medium and the couple intended to finish it.  Next was a lone fellow... I bet he didn't get a large pizza, probably small or personal sized.  Ain't no sharing that with random dickweed, that's dinner.

Then.  Then they made sure we saw a fricking Large pizza given to a homeless man who can afford cigarettes and, by the size of him, hasn't been suffering too much on the nutritive sustenance front.  Sure, he's gonna have pizza left over and easy come, easy go.
 
2014-07-14 06:09:41 PM
Isn't the etiquette among the homeless that if you have something viable (food, wine, cigarettes, pot) then it is sharable?

I would also presume there are winos who hide to chug a bottle after they have scored.
 
2014-07-14 06:12:51 PM
"Now we're going to try the same thing, but with bourbon..."
 
2014-07-14 06:14:08 PM
I don;t give two shiats who the hell you are, don't bother my damned pizza or I'll fork the hell out of ya!

/good lookin` chick might get my pepperoni roll for a while
 
2014-07-14 06:16:49 PM
The REAL message here is:

People don't mind sharing something that they did not pay for.
 
2014-07-14 06:18:50 PM
Homeless people don't have souls.
 
2014-07-14 06:29:25 PM
I wonder how many takes it took to filter out those who would give a slice, or homeless people it took telling them to piss off?

/income level != how charitable you are with what you have
//hate it when that shiatty acoustic music comes on hinting to how someone is supposed to feel during videos, just show the damn video
 
2014-07-14 06:42:29 PM
Doesn't he make enough money on Orphan Black to buy his own damn pizza?
Also, give me enough footage and an editing bay and I'll convince you of anything. Schmaltzy, manipulative video is schmaltzy and manipulative. Stop trying to make class warfare a thing.
 
2014-07-14 06:45:21 PM
OK, CSB time:

I use "casual carpool" in the SF Bay area. It used to be that a driver who had three people in the car got to skip the toll booth and take the Bay Bridge without paying. About five years ago they bumped the price of a carpool to $2.50, but it's still less than the $6 a non-carpool driver pays. So casual carpool is where people line up in agreed-upon locations, and drivers going to SF stop to pick up a car-pool's worth of riders.

Since they started charging for car-pools, some riders have started offering a dollar to drivers. In the location where I go, it's totally up to the rider to offer. The drivers almost never ask for a "donation."

I make a point of offering $1 as I'm leaving the car. What I've found is that the about 50% of the time the driver doesn't take the dollar. Even more interesting to me is that the more luxurious cars tend to belong to people who will take the dollar, while the busted up POSes are driven by people who, more often than not, refuse the dollar.

One of the drivers I've ridden with a few times is a partner at a 1000-attorney law firm where I used to work. She drives her Mercedes in and picks us up, and always accepts the dollar.

I think it's worth spending some time, and so I plan to start a spreadsheet of the make/model/condition of the cars, and whether or not the donation is accepted, because my experience to this point is that there is a correlation.

/end CSB
 
2014-07-14 07:05:54 PM
I would have gave him a slice for one of the gold chains he was wearing.

Then I would have tied some mono-filament to the gold chain and teased the homeless guy.
 
2014-07-14 07:11:45 PM

lostcat: OK, CSB time:

I use "casual carpool" in the SF Bay area. It used to be that a driver who had three people in the car got to skip the toll booth and take the Bay Bridge without paying. About five years ago they bumped the price of a carpool to $2.50, but it's still less than the $6 a non-carpool driver pays. So casual carpool is where people line up in agreed-upon locations, and drivers going to SF stop to pick up a car-pool's worth of riders.

Since they started charging for car-pools, some riders have started offering a dollar to drivers. In the location where I go, it's totally up to the rider to offer. The drivers almost never ask for a "donation."

I make a point of offering $1 as I'm leaving the car. What I've found is that the about 50% of the time the driver doesn't take the dollar. Even more interesting to me is that the more luxurious cars tend to belong to people who will take the dollar, while the busted up POSes are driven by people who, more often than not, refuse the dollar.

One of the drivers I've ridden with a few times is a partner at a 1000-attorney law firm where I used to work. She drives her Mercedes in and picks us up, and always accepts the dollar.

I think it's worth spending some time, and so I plan to start a spreadsheet of the make/model/condition of the cars, and whether or not the donation is accepted, because my experience to this point is that there is a correlation.

/end CSB


I've always figured that it depends on the experiences of the people. People who have worked for tips tend to tip well. People who have worked customer service jobs tend to be nicer to other service workers. Etc. So if you've had to bum a ride before it might be more natural to not take the dollar because you've been there. Or can appreciate the symbiotic nature of a shared favor. It's not so much social status and wealth but life experiences. At least in my general experience that seems to be the trend.It is an interesting idea though.
 
2014-07-14 07:17:27 PM
I thought this was common knowledge.
 
2014-07-14 07:17:37 PM
People who can afford tats and gold chains bumming slices inside a restaurant should get a Hell No from everyone.
And a big kick in the ass.

Homeless guy sure doesn't look like he's missed very many meals.
They pizza was free so, hey, why not accept it. Some people will happily take free stuff even if they don't need it.
I see he had money for his "after dinner" cigarettes.
 
2014-07-14 07:41:56 PM

ckevinc: I see he had money for his "after dinner" cigarettes.


It's rare that I'll give cash.

I will give food/sterno/cigarettes/clothing/tips and phone numbers for support orgs.  Montgomery County, MD does pretty well by it's own homeless.  Before the near-depression Montgomery County used to help anyone that showed up so it got homeless from up and down the east coast.  It pulled back the safety net a bit but still does a great deal for its citizens.  D.C.... it's rough.
 
2014-07-14 07:44:21 PM
I actually agree with the conclusion we're supposed to reach from it, but the two things are apples and oranges.  Some blinged-out dick hitting me up in a restaurant isn't going to get anything - it's just rude and weird.  If I'm sitting around outside with a big free pizza someone just gave me and some friendly person, even a blinged-out dick,  asks me for a piece, well, why not?
 
2014-07-14 07:51:24 PM

Ishkur: The REAL message here is:

People don't mind sharing something that they did not pay for.


Heyoo!
You are correct sir!
 
2014-07-14 07:57:25 PM

Tellingthem: I've always figured that it depends on the experiences of the people.


Bingo.

csb time... in high school I caddied at a very exclusive country club, one of those clubs where 2 or 3 generations of a family would be members. It was frequently my experience, and the experience of many of my co-caddies, that you could do 18 holes in the morning with Dr Rosenpenis Senior (a 70 year old man whose father was a house painter or a tailor, who grew up poor and worked his way through medical school) and you'd get a solid tip.

You could then do another 18 holes that afternoon with his son, Dr Rosenpenis Junior (a 35 year old man-child whose father was a doctor, who grew up wealthy and was put through school on his parents' dime) and he'd give you the bare minimum caddy fee, no tip.

People who've known nothing but wealth their entire lives are generally pretty effing cheap, whereas wealthy people who started out at the bottom and worked their way up understand what it's like to be on the other side of the fence.
 
2014-07-14 08:24:00 PM
Every time I see a video like this I automatically assume it is either:

A) "viral" marketing for some company or campaign

or

B) a film school student's attempt to make some inane point about society, or the human condition, or whatever. BECAUSE FEELINGS. FEEL THE FEELINGS. THEY MAKE ME FEEL THINGS AND YOU SHOULD FEEL THOSE THINGS TOO.

This was a colossal waste of my time, which I could have spent doing better things like drinking beer or masturbating. Are you happy now, Subby? ARE YOU?!
 
2014-07-14 08:37:19 PM

unlikely: When I was driving pizzas my best tips came from the smaller low-end detached housing. Trailer Parks were always scraping nickels together to reach the total, and the huge houses didn't tip at all.


This

/ And if there was a BMW or Mercedes in the driveway you could forget about a tip.
// Hope they enjoyed the extra toppings some drivers added to their pizza.
/// Never did anything to anyone's food. Well...  not for not tipping anyway...
 
2014-07-14 08:38:16 PM

BrundleFlyForAWhiteGuy: This was a colossal waste of my time, which I could have spent doing better things like drinking beer or masturbating


OR?  Pfft amateur
 
2014-07-14 08:52:38 PM
CSB time:

Years ago I worked at an alternative radio station that did a ton of live remotes from a venue in a sketchy part of town with a McDonalds next door.  Panhandlers abounded.  When hit up for money for "food", one of my coworkers always offered to walk over with them to Ronald's Supper Club and buy them anything they wanted from the menu.  Nobody ever took him up on his offer.

Also, why would a shop owner allow non-paying people to interrupt their guests' dinner?  Set off my bullshiat detector a little bit.
 
2014-07-14 09:08:52 PM

RoxtarRyan: /income level != how charitable you are with what you have


Statistically speaking, your statement is not supported by reality (in the US anyway)

In 2011, the wealthiest Americans-those with earnings in the top 20 percent-contributed on average 1.3 percent of their income to charity. By comparison, Americans at the base of the income pyramid-those in the bottom 20 percent-donated 3.2 percent of their income. The relative generosity of lower-income Americans is accentuated by the fact that, unlike middle-class and wealthy donors, most of them cannot take advantage of the charitable tax deduction, because they do not itemize deductions on their income-tax returns.

LINK

LINK

LINK
 
2014-07-14 09:24:01 PM

Finger51: RoxtarRyan: /income level != how charitable you are with what you have

Statistically speaking, your statement is not supported by reality (in the US anyway)

In 2011, the wealthiest Americans-those with earnings in the top 20 percent-contributed on average 1.3 percent of their income to charity. By comparison, Americans at the base of the income pyramid-those in the bottom 20 percent-donated 3.2 percent of their income. The relative generosity of lower-income Americans is accentuated by the fact that, unlike middle-class and wealthy donors, most of them cannot take advantage of the charitable tax deduction, because they do not itemize deductions on their income-tax returns.

LINK

LINK

LINK


Percentage wise sure.
But dollars spend more then percentages.
 
2014-07-14 09:40:42 PM

lostcat: OK, CSB time:

I use "casual carpool" in the SF Bay area. It used to be that a driver who had three people in the car got to skip the toll booth and take the Bay Bridge without paying. About five years ago they bumped the price of a carpool to $2.50, but it's still less than the $6 a non-carpool driver pays. So casual carpool is where people line up in agreed-upon locations, and drivers going to SF stop to pick up a car-pool's worth of riders.

Since they started charging for car-pools, some riders have started offering a dollar to drivers. In the location where I go, it's totally up to the rider to offer. The drivers almost never ask for a "donation."

I make a point of offering $1 as I'm leaving the car. What I've found is that the about 50% of the time the driver doesn't take the dollar. Even more interesting to me is that the more luxurious cars tend to belong to people who will take the dollar, while the busted up POSes are driven by people who, more often than not, refuse the dollar.

One of the drivers I've ridden with a few times is a partner at a 1000-attorney law firm where I used to work. She drives her Mercedes in and picks us up, and always accepts the dollar.

I think it's worth spending some time, and so I plan to start a spreadsheet of the make/model/condition of the cars, and whether or not the donation is accepted, because my experience to this point is that there is a correlation.

/end CSB


It could be your Mercedes-driving lawyer friend accepts the dollar not because she really needs or wants it, but because she doesn't want you to feel guilty about accepting a free ride or she doesn't want you to feel like you owe her anything.  It's a farking dollar, FFS.

My own CSB

I gave my leftover pizza to a couple hitchhiking and hiking across country with their dog.  I'm not sure if really homeless as they had a destination in mind.   So I guess I'm a pretty charitable guy.  They were very thankful and asked if I minded if they shared it with their dog.  (Of course I didn't mind)

And actually, I don't consider myself that charitable.  It was a few slices of leftover pizza.
 
2014-07-14 09:43:57 PM

johnsoninca: Wow. That made me think.

I never realized hipsters would mooch off of homeless people.

How very wrong I was.


Always knew hipsters were bastards, but this is over the top.
 
2014-07-14 09:56:21 PM

Ed Becker: CSB time:

Years ago I worked at an alternative radio station that did a ton of live remotes from a venue in a sketchy part of town with a McDonalds next door.  Panhandlers abounded.  When hit up for money for "food", one of my coworkers always offered to walk over with them to Ronald's Supper Club and buy them anything they wanted from the menu.   Nobody ever took him up on his offer.


Because they probably don't need food, they need money. Homeless people know how to find food. Food banks abound. The better part of their day can be spent waiting in line at a soup kitchen if they feel like it. It gives them something to do.  But what they don't have is money for everything else - anything to make their miserable existence just a little better, whether it's cigarettes, liquor, clothes, toothpaste, or drugs.

Years ago when I lived in downtown DC there was a homeless guy named Hoster (no idea where the name came from) who would panhandle late into the night outside the liquor store I went to. Sometimes I'd give him a dollar, but if I was flush with cash I'd offer to take him in and buy him a pint and a pack of smokes, and he always took me up on that offer. I figured we were both there for the same thing, so who was I to judge? He had shopping for liquor down to a science.  What's on sale? Of the stuff on sale, what has the highest alcohol content? Of the highest alcohol content, what comes in a glass bottle, since you can reuse it or return it for money?
 
2014-07-14 10:08:17 PM
This idea that rich people don't tip gets mentioned a lot on fark, but I've never experienced this at all.  I'm not saying it isn't true in some cases, but it seems like people are looking for a confirmation bias when it happens with rich people yet ignore it when poor people don't tip well because they expect it.

Also, when you're at a location where your car/home/wealth can't be "seen" by people like a restaurant, how do you know who is rich or poor?  Are you assuming people are rich because they are well dressed and others are poor because they are in jeans?  That seems silly.

Maybe I just know a lot of generous rich people or something because it's usually my poor/working class or middle class friends who are calculating to the penny for the 15% tip and seem annoyed when I'm always tipping over 20% or giving large amounts to valet, bartenders, moving men, delivery guys, etc.

/Of course I wouldn't have given that guy my food if I was eating in a restaurant.  That's just weird.
 
2014-07-14 10:21:45 PM

wichitaleaf: Finger51: RoxtarRyan: /income level != how charitable you are with what you have

Statistically speaking, your statement is not supported by reality (in the US anyway)

In 2011, the wealthiest Americans-those with earnings in the top 20 percent-contributed on average 1.3 percent of their income to charity. By comparison, Americans at the base of the income pyramid-those in the bottom 20 percent-donated 3.2 percent of their income. The relative generosity of lower-income Americans is accentuated by the fact that, unlike middle-class and wealthy donors, most of them cannot take advantage of the charitable tax deduction, because they do not itemize deductions on their income-tax returns.

LINK

LINK

LINK

Percentage wise sure.
But dollars spend more then percentages.


then percentages ... do what?

You're one of those guys who is proud of being willfully ignorant aren't you?
 
2014-07-14 10:23:44 PM
Is that kid the 21st Century descendant of "Billy Two-Wieners"?

i.imgur.com
 
2014-07-14 10:25:03 PM
I'll give a slice of pizza to a old, homeless-looking guy. I will never give a slice of pizza to a young, white teen, because I know they aren't actually wanting for anything.
 
2014-07-14 10:29:43 PM

deadsanta: I'll give a slice of pizza to a old, homeless-looking guy. I will never give a slice of pizza to a young, white teen, because I know they aren't actually wanting for anything.


And this, folks, is the face of prejudice.
 
2014-07-14 10:50:37 PM

calbert: that was really dumb.

it doesn't prove anything, it doesn't mean anything.

there's nothing deep or thought-provoking about it.

it comes across as trite.

christ what a dumb waste of everything.


I could not agree with you more.
 
2014-07-14 10:54:24 PM

danielscissorhands: I could not agree with you more.


He's from one of those Big Brother UK shows, apparently.

i.e. he was selected because he was remarkably twatty.
 
JRB
2014-07-14 11:04:30 PM
Fascinating. Hey - here's a twist...Let's make a wager on it.

Let's go back into the pizza parlor, and wait for someone to order a small pizza, to eat in house. But then we give them a larger pizza than what they ordered (i.e., more than they expect to eat at once), and tell them it's free.

Now let's send the hipster douche in to ask for a slice, and see how many people give him one, now that they have a free pizza that's more than they can eat.

Who's gonna bet that we'll get the same amount of non-sharers among this new sample of test subjects vs. those who BOUGHT their own food?
 
2014-07-14 11:10:47 PM
Maybe the lesson here is.. Rich people are rich because they're cheap.  A poor person gives, and therefore doesn't have anything left for himself.  It's a shiatty way to look at it, but maybe there's some truth to it.

Don't they always say when you need it, you never get it.  When you have it, you get it anyway.  You look at some of the bags of schwag some of these celebrities get at these award shows, gifts worth 5-figures, and often they just leave it because they don't need it or want it (even though most of us would hock that stuff for cash in a heartbeat).

And don't even get me started on rich charities, which are nothing but tax write-offs.
 
2014-07-14 11:24:51 PM

toyotaboy: Maybe the lesson here is.. Rich people are rich because they're cheap.  A poor person gives, and therefore doesn't have anything left for himself.  It's a shiatty way to look at it, but maybe there's some truth to it.

Don't they always say when you need it, you never get it.  When you have it, you get it anyway.  You look at some of the bags of schwag some of these celebrities get at these award shows, gifts worth 5-figures, and often they just leave it because they don't need it or want it (even though most of us would hock that stuff for cash in a heartbeat).

And don't even get me started on rich charities, which are nothing but tax write-offs.


Once you can afford to buy certain things in bulk, you end up spending less money. When you can afford a $500 repair on your car instead of taking out a $10000 loan for a new car, you end up spending less money.

When you buy TF for six months, you save money. The more money you have, the less you pay for things.

Capitalism...where you capitalize on the poor. F*CK YEAH
 
2014-07-14 11:46:11 PM
Fake as hell.
 
2014-07-14 11:47:51 PM

RoxtarRyan: I wonder how many takes it took to filter out those who would give a slice, or homeless people it took telling them to piss off?

/income level != how charitable you are with what you have
//hate it when that shiatty acoustic music comes on hinting to how someone is supposed to feel during videos, just show the damn video


Guess again.
 
2014-07-15 12:03:32 AM

BumpInTheNight: No wonder he's homeless, no resource management skills at all.


Agreed. He could have started a pizza business.
 
2014-07-15 12:12:16 AM

Finger51: RoxtarRyan: /income level != how charitable you are with what you have

Statistically speaking, your statement is not supported by reality (in the US anyway)

In 2011, the wealthiest Americans-those with earnings in the top 20 percent-contributed on average 1.3 percent of their income to charity. By comparison, Americans at the base of the income pyramid-those in the bottom 20 percent-donated 3.2 percent of their income. The relative generosity of lower-income Americans is accentuated by the fact that, unlike middle-class and wealthy donors, most of them cannot take advantage of the charitable tax deduction, because they do not itemize deductions on their income-tax returns.


[Jesus] sat down opposite the treasury and observed how the crowd put money into the treasury. Many rich people put in large sums.  A poor widow also came and put in two small coins worth a few cents. Calling his disciples to himself, he said to them, "Amen, I say to you, this poor widow put in more than all the other contributors to the treasury. For they have all contributed from their surplus wealth, but she, from her poverty, has contributed all she had, her whole livelihood." -Mark 12:41-44
 
2014-07-15 12:13:05 AM
I always tip well. In an apathetic world it often gets you reasonably adequate service.
 
2014-07-15 12:26:29 AM
I've never had someone ask me specifically for food.  I've had people ask for money "for food" but most of them just aren't believable (overweight and/or tattooed, they aren't needy, just lazy).

One time I offered to buy lunch for a guy who claimed he was hungry.  So we went to a slice shop and got pizza, and he barely ate any of his, threw most of a slice away.  He wasn't really hungry, just trying to look pathetic to get me to give him money for his drugs or booze.  When I'd taken up too much of his time, he admitted that he was just trying to scam me, so I stopped talking to him.

I tried though.  Did what you're supposed to do, got taken advantage of.  No surprises.

And although I live in one of the 'big houses', I always tip the pizza delivery driver, even if they're late.  Chances are very high that they're late due to someone else's screwup.  And I usually contribute between 5 and 10 percent of my after-tax income to charity.  So there.
 
2014-07-15 12:50:45 AM

demaL-demaL-yeH: RoxtarRyan: I wonder how many takes it took to filter out those who would give a slice, or homeless people it took telling them to piss off?

/income level != how charitable you are with what you have
//hate it when that shiatty acoustic music comes on hinting to how someone is supposed to feel during videos, just show the damn video

Guess again.


Counter-point?
http://economix.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/10/18/which-americans-are-mos t- generous-and-to-whom/
 
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