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(WCVB Boston)   Nineteen year-old woman who survived the Boston Marathon bombing was kicked out of TJ Maxx because she wouldn't comply with a new company policy saying all service dogs had to be put in a shopping cart   (wcvb.com) divider line 206
    More: Sick  
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10516 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Jul 2014 at 2:24 PM (37 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-13 11:07:28 AM  
It kind of blows my mind that people still don't get how the laws works regarding service animals.
 
2014-07-13 11:20:09 AM  

ginandbacon: It kind of blows my mind that people still don't get how the laws works regarding service animals.


Me too.

I can just imagine this dumbass manager telling a blind person that they have to put their seeing eye dog in a shopping cart.
 
2014-07-13 11:31:16 AM  
I'm even more shocked that the article makes zero mention of lawyers. But, it's still early.
 
2014-07-13 11:32:01 AM  

Bathia_Mapes: ginandbacon: It kind of blows my mind that people still don't get how the laws works regarding service animals.

Me too.

I can just imagine this dumbass manager telling a blind person that they have to put their seeing eye dog in a shopping cart.


That's just it, it's never about a blind person and an actual seeing-eye dog.  It's always somebody's 'service animal', there to help with an anxiety attack or some such sh*t...
 
2014-07-13 11:39:30 AM  
x3.cdn03.imgwykop.pl

But would the dog have counted as an item in the '10 Items or Less' checkout lane?
 
2014-07-13 12:02:05 PM  
WTF TJM?
 
2014-07-13 12:30:35 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: ginandbacon: It kind of blows my mind that people still don't get how the laws works regarding service animals.

Me too.

I can just imagine this dumbass manager telling a blind person that they have to put their seeing eye dog in a shopping cart.




My first thought as well.

One bark for left two barks for right?
 
2014-07-13 12:33:09 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: ginandbacon: It kind of blows my mind that people still don't get how the laws works regarding service animals.

Me too.

I can just imagine this dumbass manager telling a blind person that they have to put their seeing eye dog in a shopping cart.


I am a horrible horrible person for laughing so hard at that.

PhiloeBedoe: It's always somebody's 'service animal', there to help with an anxiety attack or some such sh*t...


So you think people who use service animals to help with PTSD are making things up?
 
2014-07-13 01:13:56 PM  

ginandbacon: Bathia_Mapes: ginandbacon: It kind of blows my mind that people still don't get how the laws works regarding service animals.

Me too.

I can just imagine this dumbass manager telling a blind person that they have to put their seeing eye dog in a shopping cart.

I am a horrible horrible person for laughing so hard at that.

PhiloeBedoe: It's always somebody's 'service animal', there to help with an anxiety attack or some such sh*t...

So you think people who use service animals to help with PTSD are making things up?


No, I just think this young lady could have managed to have been away from her 'service animal' for 15-20 minutes and should have left the animal at home while she went shopping.  The manager was being very accommodating by letting her bring the animal in and letting it ride in the cart.  And I seriously doubt he would ever ask someone who needs an animal for mobility purposes, like an actual seeing-eye dog, to do the same...
 
2014-07-13 01:15:03 PM  

ginandbacon: Bathia_Mapes: ginandbacon: It kind of blows my mind that people still don't get how the laws works regarding service animals.

Me too.

I can just imagine this dumbass manager telling a blind person that they have to put their seeing eye dog in a shopping cart.

I am a horrible horrible person for laughing so hard at that.

PhiloeBedoe: It's always somebody's 'service animal', there to help with an anxiety attack or some such sh*t...

So you think people who use service animals to help with PTSD are making things up?


I really hope I don't come off as a heartless asshole here, but how can a dog be so helpful with PTSD that it's gotta be with you everywhere you go?

**car backfires**

GAAAAAA! CHARLIE'S DROPPING MORTARS INSIDE THE WIRE AND...

...Awwwww look at the cute widdle doggie.

I don't understand. I'm trying to keep an open mind and not calling bullshiat... Yet.
 
2014-07-13 01:25:20 PM  

ginandbacon: So you think people who use service animals to help with PTSD are making things up?


Probably not, but I also know from experience that there are many women with purse dogs who bring them into libraries and claim they're assistance animals for psychological purposes.  Translation:  If you don't let me bring my fashion accessory dog in here, I am going to Lose. My. Farking. Mind.
 
2014-07-13 01:41:56 PM  
Only blind people need service dogs.
 
2014-07-13 01:43:43 PM  

Riche: how can a dog be so helpful with PTSD


Provide Deep Pressure for Calming Effect
Those who suffer from panic attacks have reported that the pressure of the weight of a medium size dog or a large dog against their abdomen and chest has a significant calming effect.  It can shorten the duration of the attack; often prevent the symptoms from escalating.  This same task performed by service dogs for its calming benefit for children and adults who are autistic and prone to panic attacks has become known as "deep pressure therapy" in the assistance dog field.  One way it is performed is to have a medium size dog lie atop someone who is lying on their back on a floor, bed or sofa, forepaws over the shoulders of the partner.  A large dog could be too heavy in that position; also some dogs dislike it.  A second way is have the partner sit up in a recliner chair, with the large dog approaching from the side so when he does a "Lap Up" on command, standing on his hind legs, he will be draping most of his body weight across the partner's abdomen, lying partly on his side, leaning his shoulder into the partner's torso, his forelegs on the other side of the partner's lap.  Once trained to quietly hold that position for up to five minutes, this same task can be adapted to just about any chair, couch or bench seat his partner sits on.  A dog should be given a rest break for at least a minute, back on all four paws, before repeating this task on his hind legs.  Similarly, the weight and warmth of a medium to large size dog lying across the partner's lap, applying pressure to that person's stomach and chest, may be utilized in a vehicle's front seat, on the ground or in another location that supports the dog's entire body in the Down position, for as long as needed during a panic attack.

•               Dog is trained to provide deep pressure therapy during a panic attack.  Precise behavior at such a time may be dictated by dog's size, preference and partner's location. Dog must be trained to promptly get Off the person on command.

Crowd Control, Panic Prevention In Public

A number of individuals disabled by PTSD and other psychiatric conditions report one of their difficulties in maintaining employment is the claustrophobic reaction they suffer when a colleague, boss, or customer comes too close to them.  The revulsion they experience is not limited to the workplace of course.  Avoiding situations where closeness may take place will lead to someone becoming increasingly homebound.  Through teamwork with a service dog, some of these individuals have regained the ability to do their own shopping and to ride on public transportation.  Such teamwork may also enable them to cope better with the risk of close contact in the workplace or at a Little League game, the polls on Election Day and other places which may draw a crowd, helping the partner to lead a much more normal life.

∙        Dog is first trained on how to brace himself on a Stand Stay so that he cannot be jostled out of position.  Technique was developed by service dog trainers to protect patients with Reflex Sympathy Dystrophy from accidental bumps that can trigger an excruciatingly painful RSD flare-up.   Same task can prevent or reduce panic by creating enough distance for a situation to become tolerable.  A large sturdy dog is schooled to move into Position (front, behind, left or right side) and to brace for possible impact with an innocuous command, such as "Stay Close."  Dog holds his ground, preventing people from making body contact with his partner while in line or on a bus, elevator or in the same room etc.  Enhance the effectiveness of this strategy by asking a person to step back, using dog's alleged fear of having his paws stepped on as a plausible reason for making such a request.

∙        Dog is trained to repeatedly circle the partner to keep people at a comfortable distance. Short term strategy for backing people off.


•               Dog of any size can be schooled to move fast into requested Position, usually in front of or behind the partner and perform a quick Down Stay.  Must learn to drop with his back to the person approaching or persons in line.  Should lie flat on his side or at least on one hip, to maximize the distance between the partner and nearest person.   If worried a small dog might be stepped, have him do a Stand-Stay instead, with the tail end nearest to the person to be kept at bay so as to maximize the distance this achieves.

Arouse From Fear Paralysis or Disassociation Spell

In Parkinson's, where the person freezes and is unable move, the dog is schooled to assist the individual by making physical contact, such as lightly tapping the person's shoe with his paw. This apparently is sufficient to break the spell, allowing the individual to resume movement.  Reportedly, similar behavior - physical stimulation through pawing or nose nudging, - can rouse someone from a disassociation state, at least sufficiently to make the person aware of his/her plight, thus providing a chance to focus and fight the symptoms.  This may also be effective in fear paralysis, another symptom of PTSD.  Transforming it from an accidental spontaneous behavior into a reliable skill will require months of diligent schooling and practice.  (Training Note: Simulate the trance state, then use click & treat or "Yes!" & treat to teach the dog the desired response, perhaps hiring a professional dog trainer to shape and reinforce the behavior.  If there are frequent practice sessions in a variety of settings, this training may enable the dog to perform this valuable task whenever the freezing behavior, fear paralysis or disassociation occurs in real life.  Alternatively, teach it as a hearing dog alert to a wristwatch alarm.) Those who lose awareness of the dog and their surroundings when disassociating should consider using a Waist Leash or type with a wrist band that can be velcroed to one's wrist so the dog won't wander off if you drop the leash when you disassociate outside your home.

∙        Dog is trained to nudge handler during freezing behavior to rouse handler from a disassociative state or fear paralysis.

•               Dog is trained to respond with nudging and/or pawing whenever he hears the beeping from a wristwatch with an alarm clock function, which his partner can set to go off as frequently as desired, so the dog can arouse the seated or ambulating partner from a disassociative episode at home or in public.  If fully alert, the partner can just reset the alarm before the alarm due to go off, unless he chooses to give the dog a practice session.   Could be useful for someone with appointments or classes to get to or other responsibilities, if he or she is responsive to a service dog nudging or pawing when disassociating.

Fear Management In Public


These tasks for working with a service dog in public settings gives a victim of assault new coping strategies that could go a long way to mitigating the disabling fear experienced as a consequence of the trauma.  At the same time, if utilized correctly, none of these tasks will spoil a service dog's gentle trusting nature.


Reducing Hyper-vigilance Through Teamwork
Victims of assault who develop disabling PTSD report success in coping with their highly fearful state of mind, called hyper vigilance, through teamwork with a service dog.  The dog selected should have a laid back, amiable, very confident temperament.  The dog must be well socialized so he can handle the challenges of public access work in a calm manner.  He must be trained to remain obedient and unobtrusive even if the handler reacts with extreme terror to various stimuli, seeing potential threats where none exist.  By remaining calm in such situations, the service dog's relaxed confident demeanor serves as a reality check for one whose perception of danger can no longer be trusted.  This enables hyper vigilant individuals to more accurately assess the situation and to make reality informed decisions about what to do.  Like guide dog and hearing dog handlers who rely on their dogs' body language to enhance their ability to safely navigate their environment, individuals with PTSD report impressive gains in their ability to function outside the home, relying on their dog's training and body language to compensate for the mental impairment they must contend with.  Dog may also be taught to do a "Who's There?" reality check on command before entering a parking lot or other feared locations.

(NOTE: When the approach of a jogger or some other innocent bystander triggers the handler's hyper vigilant fear she is in mortal danger, the last thing in the world that is needed is a fiercely protective guard dog who due to instinct or training leaps to the handler's defense with a frightening display of aggressive behavior.  Such a reaction won't mitigate the disability by decreasing the victim's hyper vigilant state of mind.  Rather it forces the handler to become much more vigilant, knowing this dog is capable of hurting any human whom he perceives to be a threat to the team.  Trying to deal with the dog's hyper vigilance as well as your own will be counter productive and exhausting.  Furthermore, aggressive acting dogs do not qualify for access as legitimate service animals.  Much more could be said on the subject, but suffice it to say, this would be a misguided and dangerous approach to helping assault victims cope with psychiatric disorders like PTSD.)


Keep Suspicious Strangers Away
        A dog is a much better crime deterrent than burglar alarms, extra locks and security lighting according to police statistics.  Those who wish to enhance the psychological deterrent effect should consider the dog's size, color and breed appearance in making a selection.  Studies have revealed people are much more afraid of black dogs than light colored ones.  By way of example, a large black Labrador Retriever will have the same gentle temperament but look twice as formidable as a yellow Labrador Retriever.  A Great Dane is going to be more of a deterrent than a toy poodle.
         This segment describes four tasks which could assist a handler to keep suspicious strangers at bay.  However, the tasks are only meant to create an illusion.  The dog must be rigorously schooled NOT to be protective in these situations even if partner acts fearful.   A service dog should only perform these tasks to please his handler and/or earn a treat.
          Actual protection training /attack training is ethically prohibited for legitimate service dogs.  A service dog should never be allowed to bark AT strangers in public. The following tasks will provide much safer and much more useful kinds of behavior in the long run than having an over protective dog.  These tasks offer a non-violent alternative to carrying a weapon for someone coping with the fear of another assault.  Useful as a bluff strategy for other kinds of assistance dogs too.  Won't ruin the underlying good natured tolerance for strangers that is the appropriate temperament every assistance dog should exhibit and be tested for prior to any training.

(Note: Please do not publicize the fact that some assistance dog handlers may teach their dogs bluff tasks for this could have a detrimental impact on the safety of a team.  However, it would be honest and acceptable to say to a reporter or write: "Service dogs can be schooled to perform tasks that enhance the safety of their disabled owners."   Realize that it is never acceptable to alarm the public, arousing fear of assistance dogs when addressing this topic in a public forum.  This is a very thin line that must be walked with great sensitivity.)


∙        Dog is trained to obey the bluff command "Cover Me."  Dog learns to jump up and turn around, standing next to his partner, facing backwards.  (It is a Stand-stay obedience exercise with a dog facing in a different direction than usual.  A mugger may receive the impression the dog is watching for trouble.)

∙        May also train a dog to turn his head from side to side, while facing people behind you. Taught by using click & treat or verbal "Yes" & treat, rewarding him whenever he turns head to the left.  Use the bluff command:  "Watch My Back".  Psychologically, with a large dog, it's a crime deterrent, while partner operates an ATM machine or while quickly unlocking a car or an office door.  Dog does not actually do anything more than hold a Stand-stay position, while giving the impression that he is visually scanning the area for possible trouble.  After the dog turns his head from side to side, four to six times in a row, reward him, then ask him to repeat it.

∙        Dog rises from a Down-stay position to assume a Stand-stay position next to or in front of his disabled partner.  What changes this from a routine obedience exercise to an effective illusion is teaching the dog to spring up quickly when the handler uses a bluff command such as, "On Guard!"  To heighten the illusion, the handler should grip the dog's collar as if the dog needs to be restrained from charging forward.

∙        Dog is taught to "Bark for Help," on command, or when you snap your fingers, to earn a treat.  This vocalizing attracts attention to the team, scaring off a mugger or some other predator, for the last thing a criminal wants is the public's attention focused on his activities.  Teaching the dog to bark enthusiastically, instead of falling silent in eager anticipation of his treat after only two or three barks requires several months of schooling in the home, vehicle and a variety of other locations, before it will be a dependable task.


These are just some tasks service dogs can perform to assist a partner with the types of psychiatric issues that can often keep people from feeling safe enough or comfortable enough to even leave their home. I have seen dogs that were trained to check around the corner of a building or the next aisle of a grocery store so that the partner won't be surprised by bumping into another person suddenly. (That's a huge trigger for PTSD.) The keep away behavior is incredibly useful and most people who aren't familiar with this type of training don't even realize what the dog is doing.

It is illegal to prevent a person with a service animal partner from going about their business and interfering with the animal's tasks is also illegal. Managers may refuse accommodation to any animal that displays aggression or destructive behavior and they may inquire what tasks specifically the animal performs. They may not demand that the animal be in any way confined.

I hope this helps.
 
2014-07-13 01:47:02 PM  
By the way--the above tasks are for anxiety and compulsive disorders. There re many many more for alerts (seizure etc.) and helping with standing or balance as well as assisting with fetching and carrying.
 
2014-07-13 02:04:24 PM  

ginandbacon: Riche: how can a dog be so helpful with PTSD

Provide Deep Pressure for Calming Effect
Those who suffer from panic attacks have reported that the pressure of the weight of a medium size dog or a large dog against their abdomen and chest has a significant calming effect.  It can shorten the duration of the attack; often prevent the symptoms from escalating.  This same task performed by service dogs for its calming benefit for children and adults who are autistic and prone to panic attacks has become known as "deep pressure therapy" in the assistance dog field.  One way it is performed is to have a medium size dog lie atop someone who is lying on their back on a floor, bed or sofa, forepaws over the shoulders of the partner.  A large dog could be too heavy in that position; also some dogs dislike it.  A second way is have the partner sit up in a recliner chair, with the large dog approaching from the side so when he does a "Lap Up" on command, standing on his hind legs, he will be draping most of his body weight across the partner's abdomen, lying partly on his side, leaning his shoulder into the partner's torso, his forelegs on the other side of the partner's lap.  Once trained to quietly hold that position for up to five minutes, this same task can be adapted to just about any chair, couch or bench seat his partner sits on.  A dog should be given a rest break for at least a minute, back on all four paws, before repeating this task on his hind legs.  Similarly, the weight and warmth of a medium to large size dog lying across the partner's lap, applying pressure to that person's stomach and chest, may be utilized in a vehicle's front seat, on the ground or in another location that supports the dog's entire body in the Down position, for as long as needed during a panic attack.

•               Dog is trained to provide deep pressure therapy during a panic attack.  Precise behavior at such a time may be dictated by dog's size, preference and partner's location. Dog mus ...


Thank you for posting that. It's much appreciated :-)
 
2014-07-13 02:08:37 PM  
I was going to say this was a genius dickish move by TJM to get around the ADA, but as noted above, this is interefering with the animal's performance, and still illegal.
 
2014-07-13 02:15:25 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: Thank you for posting that. It's much appreciated :-)


Entirely my pleasure :)
 
2014-07-13 02:25:59 PM  
I don't know, should I be outraged about this?
 
2014-07-13 02:27:20 PM  
As a sign of good faith, TJ will be donating one fifth of their credit/debit card info to her, instead of just sending 100% to identity thieves.
 
2014-07-13 02:29:00 PM  

PhiloeBedoe: Bathia_Mapes: ginandbacon: It kind of blows my mind that people still don't get how the laws works regarding service animals.

Me too.

I can just imagine this dumbass manager telling a blind person that they have to put their seeing eye dog in a shopping cart.

That's just it, it's never about a blind person and an actual seeing-eye dog.  It's always somebody's 'service animal', there to help with an anxiety attack or some such sh*t...


No, it's about the store using their powers to lord over the less fortunate...and the people who let them.
 
2014-07-13 02:29:08 PM  

ginandbacon: Riche: how can a dog be so helpful with PTSD


Seriously... Thanks; that was an amazing read. It's one more reason to love dog-kind.

Dogs rock.
 
2014-07-13 02:29:58 PM  
That does it.  I'm never shopping at TJ Maxx again.

/Which is easy, since I've never been inside a TJ Maxx.
 
2014-07-13 02:30:03 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: ginandbacon: So you think people who use service animals to help with PTSD are making things up?

Probably not, but I also know from experience that there are many women with purse dogs who bring them into libraries and claim they're assistance animals for psychological purposes.  Translation:  If you don't let me bring my fashion accessory dog in here, I am going to Lose. My. Farking. Mind.


...well, if the dog can fit in a purse, she can fit in a shopping cart, too, can't she?
 
2014-07-13 02:30:32 PM  
There are going to be some really well formed intelligent statements posted in this thread.

Who am I kidding.

viewfromthenosebleeds.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-07-13 02:30:32 PM  

BalugaJoe: Only blind people need service dogs.


What about the one that helps you get dressed? Oh, you haven't gotten it yet? Better get on that.
 
2014-07-13 02:32:40 PM  
Why is it always a "veteran" or "terrorism" survivor in these stories? Its never some dude who lost a leg in a car wreck. Its almost as if these stories are written purely to create an emotional response instead of a measured thoughtful debate
 
2014-07-13 02:33:43 PM  
My service chinchilla can stay in my front pocket though right?
 
2014-07-13 02:35:07 PM  
I have acquaintances who I will stop short of calling friends who have "service animals" but no affliction other than attention whorishness. One has a Yorkie the other a pit bull. The pit bull isn't even house trained.
 
2014-07-13 02:35:19 PM  

Destructor: ginandbacon: Riche: how can a dog be so helpful with PTSD

Seriously... Thanks; that was an amazing read. It's one more reason to love dog-kind.

Dogs rock.


Smartest thing we ever did as a species was convincing them to work with us.
 
2014-07-13 02:36:16 PM  
Is the shopping cart not a reasonable accomadation?
 
2014-07-13 02:37:44 PM  

PhiloeBedoe: ginandbacon: Bathia_Mapes: ginandbacon: It kind of blows my mind that people still don't get how the laws works regarding service animals.

Me too.

I can just imagine this dumbass manager telling a blind person that they have to put their seeing eye dog in a shopping cart.

I am a horrible horrible person for laughing so hard at that.

PhiloeBedoe: It's always somebody's 'service animal', there to help with an anxiety attack or some such sh*t...

So you think people who use service animals to help with PTSD are making things up?

No, I just think this young lady could have managed to have been away from her 'service animal' for 15-20 minutes and should have left the animal at home while she went shopping.  The manager was being very accommodating by letting her bring the animal in and letting it ride in the cart.  And I seriously doubt he would ever ask someone who needs an animal for mobility purposes, like an actual seeing-eye dog, to do the same...


It doesn't really matter what you think, it's still against the law for the manager to do what they did. It's also stupid, since the manager should know better (the service dog thing is not a complicated concept) and since the price of complying with the law was.... $0 and exactly no one is inconvenienced at all.
 
2014-07-13 02:38:22 PM  
1) ginandbacon: you need a cockpunch
2) the store manager broke the law
3) farking "emotional" service animals are a God damned joke and put real service animals in jeopardy.
 
2014-07-13 02:38:53 PM  
That's one poorly trained service dog..
 
2014-07-13 02:39:50 PM  

Tobin_Lam: Is the shopping cart not a reasonable accomadation?


Only if they provide someone to push the two of you around in it. And they make everyone else do it, too.
 
2014-07-13 02:40:16 PM  

ginandbacon: Riche: how can a dog be so helpful with PTSD

Provide Deep Pressure for Calming Effect
Those who suffer from panic attacks have reported that the pressure of the weight of a medium size dog or a large dog against their abdomen and chest has a significant calming effect.  It can shorten the duration of the attack; often prevent the symptoms from escalating.  This same task performed by service dogs for its calming benefit for children and adults who are autistic and prone to panic attacks has become known as "deep pressure therapy" in the assistance dog field.  One way it is performed is to have a medium size dog lie atop someone who is lying on their back on a floor, bed or sofa, forepaws over the shoulders of the partner.  A large dog could be too heavy in that position; also some dogs dislike it.  A second way is have the partner sit up in a recliner chair, with the large dog approaching etc.......


That's really impressive.  If an owner/manager can require the person to ask if a dog is a service dog, and what tasks the dog is trained to perform, and  the person is asking to be accommodated, then I don't see how it is unreasonable for the owner to carry a license (for the dog) certifying some minimum level of training.  Would people with bona fide service dogs really be put off by such a requirement?  Also, as with a seeing eye dog, shouldn't most service dogs be more or less interchangeable between people with similar conditions?  They aren't pets, right?
 
2014-07-13 02:40:23 PM  
You know what. The manager is an idiot with no common sense. Sometimes it's just better to excercise some discretion and just let it go and save the company the negative PR and grief. They should fire his ass for stupidity.
 
2014-07-13 02:41:00 PM  

ginandbacon: Destructor: ginandbacon: Riche: how can a dog be so helpful with PTSD

Seriously... Thanks; that was an amazing read. It's one more reason to love dog-kind.

Dogs rock.

Smartest thing we ever did as a species was convincing them to work with us.


I hope that was jest.

Dogs domesticated us.
 
2014-07-13 02:41:27 PM  
they have service dogs for ptsd?

It doesn't seem like a real handicap to me.  A dog that you have to take everywhere because without it you feel sad or have feelings of anxiety?   She saw some gore and now shes disabled for life. She relies on this dog as her "complete support system".  And what happens when this dog dies? Further ammo to keep getting those disability checks..

suck it up and stop being a baby.
 
2014-07-13 02:42:52 PM  

ginandbacon: Bathia_Mapes: ginandbacon: It kind of blows my mind that people still don't get how the laws works regarding service animals.

Me too.

I can just imagine this dumbass manager telling a blind person that they have to put their seeing eye dog in a shopping cart.

I am a horrible horrible person for laughing so hard at that.

PhiloeBedoe: It's always somebody's 'service animal', there to help with an anxiety attack or some such sh*t...

So you think people who use service animals to help with PTSD are making things up?


There are some horrible, horrible people on FARK. Truly heartless.

Though still not as bad as YouTube commenters.
 
2014-07-13 02:43:20 PM  

DrBrownCow: ginandbacon: Riche: how can a dog be so helpful with PTSD

Provide Deep Pressure for Calming Effect
Those who suffer from panic attacks have reported that the pressure of the weight of a medium size dog or a large dog against their abdomen and chest has a significant calming effect.  It can shorten the duration of the attack; often prevent the symptoms from escalating.  This same task performed by service dogs for its calming benefit for children and adults who are autistic and prone to panic attacks has become known as "deep pressure therapy" in the assistance dog field.  One way it is performed is to have a medium size dog lie atop someone who is lying on their back on a floor, bed or sofa, forepaws over the shoulders of the partner.  A large dog could be too heavy in that position; also some dogs dislike it.  A second way is have the partner sit up in a recliner chair, with the large dog approaching etc.......

That's really impressive.  If an owner/manager can require the person to ask if a dog is a service dog, and what tasks the dog is trained to perform, and  the person is asking to be accommodated, then I don't see how it is unreasonable for the owner to carry a license (for the dog) certifying some minimum level of training.  Would people with bona fide service dogs really be put off by such a requirement?  Also, as with a seeing eye dog, shouldn't most service dogs be more or less interchangeable between people with similar conditions?  They aren't pets, right?


Manager:  Im sorry sir you need to show a license that this is a service dog
Blind guy: ok hold on.. here you go
Manager: this is a blank card
Blind guy:  Damn it!  I paid that guy $50 for that!
 
2014-07-13 02:43:44 PM  

johnny queso: I have acquaintances who I will stop short of calling friends who have "service animals" but no affliction other than attention whorishness. One has a Yorkie the other a pit bull. The pit bull isn't even house trained.


The service animal system is really easy to abuse and people will retreat with the guilt card if you call it out. I knew a woman in my Biology class with a German Shepard service dog. She didn't have any disabilities and the dog was often disruptive in class. Nobody ever questioned it but would say stuff behind her back about how rude she was to keep the dog.

Yet I've also seen a quadriplegic woman in a wheelchair with a dog that helps open handicap access doors for her and gets her stuff. So I got a little faith restored. I believe service animals can be amazing but arseholes use it to just take their favorite pet anywhere they want.
 
2014-07-13 02:43:52 PM  
A therapy and emotional support dog merely provides comfort to an individual in some fashion. Therapy dogs are often the pets of the therapist or psychiatric personnel of the particular institution or hospital where they bring comfort. Therapy and emotional support dogs are allowed in housing under the Fair Housing Act (FHA), but are not permitted in public places as are service dogs.

source: nh.gov.

i love seeing people get kicked out of stores now, especially local ones i have printed this out too. they've been kicking soccer moms out of lowes and walmart left and right, because all are claiming emotional support BS, which as it turns out, is NOT covered under the ADA.

HAH!

alternate source:  http://pleasedontpetme.com/differences.php 

so fark your service mutts. ive been passing flyers out to local stores around me that are sick and tired of people abusing the service dog.
 
2014-07-13 02:44:08 PM  

ltdanman44: they have service dogs for ptsd?

It doesn't seem like a real handicap to me.  A dog that you have to take everywhere because without it you feel sad or have feelings of anxiety?   She saw some gore and now shes disabled for life. She relies on this dog as her "complete support system".  And what happens when this dog dies? Further ammo to keep getting those disability checks..

suck it up and stop being a baby.


You are a sick human being.
 
2014-07-13 02:44:42 PM  
Let's try that again.......

ginandbacon: Riche: how can a dog be so helpful with PTSD

Provide Deep Pressure for Calming Effect
Those who suffer from panic attacks have reported that the pressure of the weight of a medium size dog or a large dog against their abdomen and chest has a significant calming effect.  It can shorten the duration of the attack; often prevent the symptoms from escalating.  This same task performed by service dogs for its calming benefit for children and adults who are autistic and prone to panic attacks has become known as "deep pressure therapy" in the assistance dog field.  One way it is performed is to have a medium size dog lie atop someone who is lying on their back on a floor, bed or sofa, forepaws over the shoulders of the partner.  A large dog could be too heavy in that position; also some dogs dislike it.  ....etc.....


That's really impressive.  If an owner/manager can require the person to say if a dog is a service dog, and what specific tasks the dog is trained to perform, then I don't see how it is unreasonable for the disabled person to carry a license (for the dog) certifying some minimum level of training.  Would people with bona fide service dogs really be put off by such a requirement?  Also, shouldn't most service dogs be more or less interchangeable between people with similar conditions?  They aren't pets after all, right?
 
2014-07-13 02:45:17 PM  

Riche: ginandbacon: Bathia_Mapes: ginandbacon: It kind of blows my mind that people still don't get how the laws works regarding service animals.

Me too.

I can just imagine this dumbass manager telling a blind person that they have to put their seeing eye dog in a shopping cart.

I am a horrible horrible person for laughing so hard at that.

PhiloeBedoe: It's always somebody's 'service animal', there to help with an anxiety attack or some such sh*t...

So you think people who use service animals to help with PTSD are making things up?

I really hope I don't come off as a heartless asshole here, but how can a dog be so helpful with PTSD that it's gotta be with you everywhere you go?

**car backfires**

GAAAAAA! CHARLIE'S DROPPING MORTARS INSIDE THE WIRE AND...

...Awwwww look at the cute widdle doggie.

I don't understand. I'm trying to keep an open mind and not calling bullshiat... Yet.


If you question that, you'll love this.

Sydney's mother, Celeste, who lost her legs in the attacks, said the difference in her daughter has been immeasurable.

So she needs a service dog because her mother lost a leg?

www.anuts.com
 
2014-07-13 02:45:34 PM  

johnny queso: I have acquaintances who I will stop short of calling friends who have "service animals" but no affliction other than attention whorishness. One has a Yorkie the other a pit bull. The pit bull isn't even house trained.


My sister does that as well to try to get around the no pets requirement when renting a house. She 'registered' (and I use that term loosely) her pit bull so that she can threaten to sue the landlord once they find out that she has a pit bull when the lease says no pets.

So I am on the side of the argument that a lot of the service animal claims are AW BS. Now I don't discount that there are legit uses for service animals. But there are very loose regulations to the labeling of service animals
 
2014-07-13 02:46:40 PM  
Why is this worse because the woman was a Boston bombing survivor?  Is that like a badge or something?  Is she due greater consideration than someone else who was injured through no fault of their own?

Sounds like the same people who think crimes are worse when the victim is one race and the perp another...  as if that fact makes it MORE of a crime.

"Oh, I'm sorry you have to put that dog in the cart... but me telling you to do this isn't as bad as you think since you lost your leg by being a dumbf*ck and getting hit by a car while jaywalking.  It's not like you lost it in the Boston Marathon bombing... if that were the case, what I'm asking you to do would be even more asinine."

/rant off.
 
2014-07-13 02:46:54 PM  

Doktor_Zhivago: Why is it always a "veteran" or "terrorism" survivor in these stories? Its never some dude who lost a leg in a car wreck. Its almost as if these stories are written purely to create an emotional response instead of a measured thoughtful debate


I'm not sure if you are asking in all seriousness, but in case you are, most people living with disabilities are not visually identifiable as such. Many people with psychological traumas may, in fact (like a lot of vets,) appear healthier than the average person physically. So they are more likely to have their service animals' status challenged. Most people understand exactly what a seeing-eye dog is doing while it's working. Other animals do work that is not as obvious. A person who has grand mal seizures and is accompanied by an alert dog may just look like two buddies out having fun. Very few people will actually be able to accurately assess a service animal and the service it provides. Hence the protections under ADA.
 
2014-07-13 02:47:31 PM  

ltdanman44: they have service dogs for ptsd?

It doesn't seem like a real handicap to me.  A dog that you have to take everywhere because without it you feel sad or have feelings of anxiety?   She saw some gore and now shes disabled for life. She relies on this dog as her "complete support system".  And what happens when this dog dies? Further ammo to keep getting those disability checks..

suck it up and stop being a baby.


Know how I know you have no idea wtf you are talking about?

Ask anyone who had to live with a soldier that has returned from war that got seriously messed up or watched people around them get blown to shiat whether or not if it's easy to just suck it up.


Otherwise be thankful you have never been in that situation.
 
2014-07-13 02:49:13 PM  
This is Frett. He is my service ferret. He is trained to run in and out of poster tubes back and forth. He is also trained to hunch up his back and run backwards while chittering.

I've also trained him to poop up a wall in a corner.
 
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