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(KATU)   Build this DIY air conditioner to help cool (or more likely heat) your house   (katu.com ) divider line
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5649 clicks; posted to Geek » on 12 Jul 2014 at 1:02 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-12 11:11:15 AM  
So someone without an AC happens to have a two-inch hole saw drill bit?
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-07-12 11:32:48 AM  
It amazes me that I see so many of these projects.  It takes one ton of ice to produce 12,000 BTU/h of cooling, so to be equal to a 5,000 BTU a/c it would need 834lb of ice every 24 hours.

It would have to melt 34.75lb of ice per hour.
 
2014-07-12 12:25:46 PM  

ArkAngel: So someone without an AC happens to have a two-inch hole saw drill bit?


Yet they couldn't find a styrofoam cooler.  These are the worst DIY people ever.
 
2014-07-12 12:48:18 PM  

Lsherm: Yet they couldn't find a styrofoam cooler.


To keep the room heat from melting the ice?
 
2014-07-12 01:04:12 PM  
What about filling it with dry ice? That way, when it sublimates, you can happily die from poisoning/hypoxia! But you'll die cool. Yay science!
 
2014-07-12 01:18:45 PM  
Of course the big mistake is they probably got their ice from the fridge and that will release more heat to make the ice than the ice will cool.
 
2014-07-12 01:24:37 PM  

vpb: It amazes me that I see so many of these projects.  It takes one ton of ice to produce 12,000 BTU/h of cooling, so to be equal to a 5,000 BTU a/c it would need 834lb of ice every 24 hours.

It would have to melt 34.75lb of ice per hour.


So it won't cool my house. But when I'm sitting at my desk sweating my ass off all day?  One of these tucked under my desk would do nicely to keep my comfy.
 
2014-07-12 01:27:31 PM  

ArkAngel: So someone without an AC happens to have a two-inch hole saw drill bit?


It's a DIY project, most do it yourselfers have a set of hole saws. If not they probably know someone who does.
 
2014-07-12 01:28:11 PM  
The swamp coolers work better by far
 
2014-07-12 01:35:25 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: The swamp coolers work better by far


Not so well in humid climates.
 
2014-07-12 01:36:03 PM  

vpb: It amazes me that I see so many of these projects.  It takes one ton of ice to produce 12,000 BTU/h of cooling, so to be equal to a 5,000 BTU a/c it would need 834lb of ice every 24 hours.

It would have to melt 34.75lb of ice per hour.


It's certainly not going to cool an entire room or replace the cooling power of an ac unit, but to be fair, you could place something like this directly next to you and it could act like an upgraded cooling fan. Assuming your fridge would be plugged in anyways, you wouldn't be using any more energy than to run the fan.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-07-12 01:36:48 PM  

NIXON YOU DOLT!!!!!: vpb: It amazes me that I see so many of these projects.  It takes one ton of ice to produce 12,000 BTU/h of cooling, so to be equal to a 5,000 BTU a/c it would need 834lb of ice every 24 hours.

It would have to melt 34.75lb of ice per hour.

So it won't cool my house. But when I'm sitting at my desk sweating my ass off all day?  One of these tucked under my desk would do nicely to keep my comfy.


5,000 btu is a small one room window a/c.  All you need is a freezer that can crank out 35lbs of ice an hour and you're all set.  Or you could just run to the store and buy a couple of bags every hour.
 
2014-07-12 01:37:21 PM  

Obscene_CNN: Of course the big mistake is they probably got their ice from the fridge and that will release more heat to make the ice than the ice will cool.


It's only a mistake if they are trying to cool their entire house.

When you are resorting to DIY AC projects, your goal is just to make the current heat wave more tolerable.  So ice with a fan or similar pointing at you will do a great job of giving limited relief.
 
2014-07-12 01:43:36 PM  
Marge, can you set the oven to cold?
 
2014-07-12 01:44:36 PM  

insano: Assuming your fridge would be plugged in anyways, you wouldn't be using any more energy than to run the fan.


That's not how refrigerators work. If you're making more ice, the fridge needs to pull more heat out of the water that you're freezing. The end result will be that it will run the compressor more than it otherwise would, pumping that extra heat back into your kitchen.

I did consider doing something like this while we were waiting for a part for our central A/C. The difference is that we have a standalone freezer in our garage, which isn't part of the conditioned space, so we'd be dumping the heat outside. The numbers still didn't work out, though -- too much ice for too little cooling.
 
2014-07-12 01:53:39 PM  

jfarkinB: insano: Assuming your fridge would be plugged in anyways, you wouldn't be using any more energy than to run the fan.

That's not how refrigerators work. If you're making more ice, the fridge needs to pull more heat out of the water that you're freezing. The end result will be that it will run the compressor more than it otherwise would, pumping that extra heat back into your kitchen.

I did consider doing something like this while we were waiting for a part for our central A/C. The difference is that we have a standalone freezer in our garage, which isn't part of the conditioned space, so we'd be dumping the heat outside. The numbers still didn't work out, though -- too much ice for too little cooling.


I'm interested to know if you figured out how much additional energy was consumed by a freezer with water vs one without?

I would guess that the difference in energy consumption between a fan and an ac unit is huge in comparison to the difference between a freezer with and without water in it. If your goal is to provide direct cold air in a very small space (like directly blowing on you while you watch tv or whatever) then it might make sense to do this instead of running an ac unit. If you need to cool a small room or bigger, then yah, this wouldn't be worth it.
 
2014-07-12 01:54:40 PM  

vpb: NIXON YOU DOLT!!!!!: vpb: It amazes me that I see so many of these projects.  It takes one ton of ice to produce 12,000 BTU/h of cooling, so to be equal to a 5,000 BTU a/c it would need 834lb of ice every 24 hours.

It would have to melt 34.75lb of ice per hour.

So it won't cool my house. But when I'm sitting at my desk sweating my ass off all day?  One of these tucked under my desk would do nicely to keep my comfy.

5,000 btu is a small one room window a/c.  All you need is a freezer that can crank out 35lbs of ice an hour and you're all set.  Or you could just run to the store and buy a couple of bags every hour.


Who said I want to cool the room?  I want a cool stream of air blowing on me.  That's all it takes to keep me comfortable. That's all this is meant to do.
 
2014-07-12 01:55:02 PM  

TheHighlandHowler: Smeggy Smurf: The swamp coolers work better by far

Not so well in humid climates.


You have to be dumber than a bag of hammers to live where it's humid
 
2014-07-12 02:01:28 PM  
Same home improvement store they used must sell reflectix insulation blankets for hot water heaters... would work as well as styrofoam.  or they could have gone wot cork sheet. Or they could have used two buckets nested with an air gap.  But yeah, the entire approach is based on a dumb idea.

You can cool your entire body with just an inch of water and ice cubes in a pan for a foot bath.  Or, you can hold ice packs in your fist or make a glove out of them, and your blood stream will conduct the cold all thru your body pretty efficiently. The Marines have a spacial cooling glove gizmo based on the principle that makes it tolerable to work in high heat environments.
 
2014-07-12 02:01:34 PM  

vpb: NIXON YOU DOLT!!!!!: vpb: It amazes me that I see so many of these projects.  It takes one ton of ice to produce 12,000 BTU/h of cooling, so to be equal to a 5,000 BTU a/c it would need 834lb of ice every 24 hours.

It would have to melt 34.75lb of ice per hour.

So it won't cool my house. But when I'm sitting at my desk sweating my ass off all day?  One of these tucked under my desk would do nicely to keep my comfy.

5,000 btu is a small one room window a/c.  All you need is a freezer that can crank out 35lbs of ice an hour and you're all set.  Or you could just run to the store and buy a couple of bags every hour.


Or you could spend the 120$ once for a window unit. It's not like they're expensive, and you're going to replicate that cost through heating/cooling/making ice/etc. in fairly short order, even accounting for the electricity to run the AC vs. make ice.
 
2014-07-12 02:03:43 PM  

kroonermanblack: vpb: NIXON YOU DOLT!!!!!: vpb: It amazes me that I see so many of these projects.  It takes one ton of ice to produce 12,000 BTU/h of cooling, so to be equal to a 5,000 BTU a/c it would need 834lb of ice every 24 hours.

It would have to melt 34.75lb of ice per hour.

So it won't cool my house. But when I'm sitting at my desk sweating my ass off all day?  One of these tucked under my desk would do nicely to keep my comfy.

5,000 btu is a small one room window a/c.  All you need is a freezer that can crank out 35lbs of ice an hour and you're all set.  Or you could just run to the store and buy a couple of bags every hour.

Or you could spend the 120$ once for a window unit. It's not like they're expensive, and you're going to replicate that cost through heating/cooling/making ice/etc. in fairly short order, even accounting for the electricity to run the AC vs. make ice.


Not everybody has an extra $120 they can spend for a one time event.  I made a swamp cooler out of a pad and a box fan.  No screws or anything, just wet the pad down and let the box fan suck it tight.  10 minutes later the pad is wet and the room is 10-20 degrees cooler.
 
2014-07-12 02:10:48 PM  
Dumbass me, 10 minutes later the pad is dry.  

/need to go rewet the pad, it's getting hot again
 
2014-07-12 02:22:39 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: Dumbass me, 10 minutes later the pad is dry.

/need to go rewet the pad, it's getting hot again


All you are doing is trading temperature for humidity. If the environment you are in is low humidity a swamp cooler is useful. If the humidity is high, then all you are doing is making the house manky.
 
2014-07-12 02:27:52 PM  
I've got a well drilling rig on property today getting ready for the heat pump for the shop today.  I'm getting a kick.
 
2014-07-12 02:31:06 PM  
It's about as efficient as heating your house with tea candles stuck in flowerpots in the winter, although there's less chance of a three-alarm conflagration with ice.
 
2014-07-12 02:34:04 PM  

kroonermanblack: Or you could spend the 120$ once for a window unit. It's not like they're expensive, and you're going to replicate that cost through heating/cooling/making ice/etc. in fairly short order, even accounting for the electricity to run the AC vs. make ice


An average AC window unit uses, what, ~1 kW and a floor fan uses ~200 W.

A fridge/freezer uses ~750 W, but that's energy you use anyways unless you unplug the fridge. So, in order to produce equivalent energy costs from this method, the process of making ice would need to increase the usage of the fridge by about 800 W (i.e. the 1000 W for the AC minus the 200 W for the fan) to replicate the cost of the AC. I find it hard to believe that making ice more than doubles the energy usage of the fridge, not to mention the $120 cost of the AC unit.

If all you need is a little cold air blowing on you for a short time, it makes sense to make this or a similar contraption rather than turn on the AC unit. If you need to cool a whole room, then just buy the AC unit.
 
2014-07-12 02:41:11 PM  

ArkAngel: So someone without an AC happens to have a two-inch hole saw drill bit?


You are aware that there are entire regions, even in the United States, where air conditioning isn't that common? It just doesn't make sense to have an entire setup for the two or three weeks of hot weather per year.
 
2014-07-12 02:55:13 PM  
Meh, an expendible AC.
 
2014-07-12 02:55:55 PM  

insano: A fridge/freezer uses ~750 W, but that's energy you use anyways unless you unplug the fridge. So, in order to produce equivalent energy costs from this method, the process of making ice would need to increase the usage of the fridge by about 800 W (i.e. the 1000 W for the AC minus the 200 W for the fan) to replicate the cost of the AC. I find it hard to believe that making ice more than doubles the energy usage of the fridge, not to mention the $120 cost of the AC unit.


You're getting closer.

A refrigerator doesn't "run" all the time; it cycles on and off to maintain the right internal temperature. If you put hot food in the main compartment, or liquid water in the freezer compartment, it has to stay on longer to pump out that extra heat (since, as you say, it can't really draw a lot more power).

Actually, it may well draw a bit more power while it's running -- coolant will come off the cold loop at a higher temperature, and the motor may have to push a little more torque to re-compress it. To be honest, I'm not sure exactly how that all works out in a modern fridge -- whether the motor draws more power, or whether it just slows down and moves less coolant.

The bottom line, though, is that you've got to use power to pump heat, and turning water into ice requires pumping more heat (as opposed to just "keeping things cold", which means "pumping out the heat that leaks in from outside"). This may make your refrigerator draw more power while it's running, but it will definitely make it run longer -- which means drawing more power (and pumping more heat into your kitchen).
 
2014-07-12 03:06:04 PM  
turn the shower full blast with cold water. Put fan in bathroom doorway blowing into the rest of the house. As long as you dont have a water meter this works great.
 
2014-07-12 03:10:34 PM  

Elfich: Smeggy Smurf: Dumbass me, 10 minutes later the pad is dry.

/need to go rewet the pad, it's getting hot again

All you are doing is trading temperature for humidity. If the environment you are in is low humidity a swamp cooler is useful. If the humidity is high, then all you are doing is making the house manky.


I'm in Boise.  It's a little over 90F in the shade and 14% humidity.  It's working just fine
 
2014-07-12 03:13:07 PM  

jfarkinB: The bottom line, though, is that you've got to use power to pump heat, and turning water into ice requires pumping more heat (as opposed to just "keeping things cold", which means "pumping out the heat that leaks in from outside"). This may make your refrigerator draw more power while it's running, but it will definitely make it run longer -- which means drawing more power (and pumping more heat into your kitchen).


I'm not disagreeing with you there. But try and estimate the additional power you think turning water into ice uses above and beyond the base usage of an empty fridge/freezer. It's likely negligible compared to the base usage, and very negligible compared to the cost of running an air conditioner or even a fan for that matter.
 
2014-07-12 03:47:12 PM  

vpb: NIXON YOU DOLT!!!!!: vpb: It amazes me that I see so many of these projects.  It takes one ton of ice to produce 12,000 BTU/h of cooling, so to be equal to a 5,000 BTU a/c it would need 834lb of ice every 24 hours.

It would have to melt 34.75lb of ice per hour.

So it won't cool my house. But when I'm sitting at my desk sweating my ass off all day?  One of these tucked under my desk would do nicely to keep my comfy.

5,000 btu is a small one room window a/c.  All you need is a freezer that can crank out 35lbs of ice an hour and you're all set.  Or you could just run to the store and buy a couple of bags every hour.


Or I supppose you could have a rotation of 2 or 3 frozen gallon jugs of water. Plus, like others have mentioned, I wouldn't use this as a primary cooling mechanism in the house, but only to blast cool air on me while I sleep during those hot summer nights where the low is in the upper 70s with 90% humidity and the A/C don't work so good upstairs. Which is common in older houses which weren't built with central air in mind.
 
2014-07-12 03:57:22 PM  

insano: It's likely negligible


No.

AC and refrigerators work off the same technology, and constant use of each will really run up the electric bill.

Fans are always cheaper.  Easier to spin a fan than run a compressor.

Fridges only are somewhat efficient because they're closed and insulated, meaning when the door is closed, it takes quite a long while for heat to seep in.  When you're constantly adding water to freeze(or just leave the door open), all efficiency is lost and it needs to run continually to cool things down.  Instead of running for ten minutes out of an hour, it's running for the whole hour.

What makes them worse than air conditioners is the heat the whole unit puts off.  With a window AC unit, the temperature exchange happens outside of the house, so it's only got to cool the air from the house faster than the house heats it up.  With a fridge, the body of the fridge is the barrier, with an open door, you're literallly just wasting electricity to run the motor.....for every bit of cool on the inside, the outside underneath gets hotter, a very temporary means of shifting heat around.

The same reason you can't just set an AC unit in the middle of the room on the floor.
 
2014-07-12 04:09:29 PM  

vpb: It amazes me that I see so many of these projects.  It takes one ton of ice to produce 12,000 BTU/h of cooling, so to be equal to a 5,000 BTU a/c it would need 834lb of ice every 24 hours.

It would have to melt 34.75lb of ice per hour.


Came to say this, though without the math.  An AC that only lasts an hour or two is hardly worth building.
 
2014-07-12 04:11:20 PM  

germ78: Or I supppose you could have a rotation of 2 or 3 frozen gallon jugs of water. Plus, like others have mentioned, I wouldn't use this as a primary cooling mechanism in the house, but only to blast cool air on me while I sleep during those hot summer nights where the low is in the upper 70s with 90% humidity and the A/C don't work so good upstairs. Which is common in older houses which weren't built with central air in mind.


By far the easier way to do this, would be a big bowl of ice and a table fan.

As far as the DIY goes, it's not about efficiency, it's about the hobbyist's love for Macguyvering things.

A guy who wanted that could hook up a radiator to his tap and use a big box fan as well.  Turn on the cold water, and the water that's heated flows down the drain.

We have good AC, but if we didn't, I'd be filling our sinks and tub with cold water(well water, even in the hottest weather, it'll come up so cold it can hurt to wash your hands in....but you can't drink it).

Maybe have a makeshift heat sink that is half submerged and sticks up in line of the fan to help transfer the heat into the water.  When the water warms, drain and refill.

And that's where piping your air through underground tubes became a useful thing.  Surface temperatures don't really go that deep, in the summer or the winter.

Or, as everyone else said, buy a cheap AC unit.  if you've got the time to Macguyver things, you've got the time to earn a spare hundred bucks or two.
 
2014-07-12 04:14:47 PM  

omeganuepsilon: insano: It's likely negligible

No.

AC and refrigerators work off the same technology, and constant use of each will really run up the electric bill.

Fans are always cheaper.  Easier to spin a fan than run a compressor.

Fridges only are somewhat efficient because they're closed and insulated, meaning when the door is closed, it takes quite a long while for heat to seep in.  When you're constantly adding water to freeze(or just leave the door open), all efficiency is lost and it needs to run continually to cool things down.  Instead of running for ten minutes out of an hour, it's running for the whole hour.

What makes them worse than air conditioners is the heat the whole unit puts off.  With a window AC unit, the temperature exchange happens outside of the house, so it's only got to cool the air from the house faster than the house heats it up.  With a fridge, the body of the fridge is the barrier, with an open door, you're literallly just wasting electricity to run the motor.....for every bit of cool on the inside, the outside underneath gets hotter, a very temporary means of shifting heat around.

The same reason you can't just set an AC unit in the middle of the room on the floor.


What do you mean, no? How much more energy do you think is drawn by adding ice above the energy normally used by the fridge with no ice? Put a wattage on it. Estimate.

Cooling method 1 energy use: fan + additional energy from making ice (not the total energy used by the fridge, the energy used above and beyond base rate for the fridge)
Cooling method 2 energy use: energy from AC

Method 1 uses less for a small personal space application. That's all I'm saying.
 
2014-07-12 04:15:02 PM  

TheHighlandHowler: Lsherm: Yet they couldn't find a styrofoam cooler.

To keep the room heat from melting the ice?


To keep it from melting as fast.  Did you read the article?
 
2014-07-12 04:25:28 PM  

insano: What do you mean, no? How much more energy do you think is drawn by adding ice above the energy normally used by the fridge with no ice? Put a wattage on it. Estimate.


12-20% on top of regular fridge usage. For an 800 watt fridge, that means you're running the equivalent of two lamps with 80 watt light bulbs just to make ice all day every day, or one 160W halogen flood lamp.

As it turns out it's not the ice making that increases the power usage, it's the mechanized arm that pushes the ice cubes out.
 
2014-07-12 04:33:22 PM  

Lsherm: insano: What do you mean, no? How much more energy do you think is drawn by adding ice above the energy normally used by the fridge with no ice? Put a wattage on it. Estimate.

12-20% on top of regular fridge usage.  For an 800 watt fridge, that means you're running the equivalent of two lamps with 80 watt light bulbs just to make ice all day every day, or one 160W halogen flood lamp.

As it turns out it's not the ice making that increases the power usage, it's the mechanized arm that pushes the ice cubes out.


So, if you just use ice cube trays instead of the automatic thing?
I always thought a fridge/freezer that had more in it ran more efficiently once everything inside cooled off.
 
2014-07-12 05:08:20 PM  

ArkAngel: So someone without an AC happens to have a two-inch hole saw drill bit?


I think it would be good for camping(if you have a ac outlet).
 
2014-07-12 05:09:12 PM  

insano: An average AC window unit uses, what, ~1 kW and a floor fan uses ~200 W.

While this takes the whole conversation to a different level, if you had the foresight to install an efficient heat-pump; namely a SEER 26 rated "mini-split" duct-less heat pump, you can heat and cool your home using the same device. I have a 1-ton (12,000 BTU) LG unit that heats and cools my house. It precisely matched BTU output with demand, so it typically runs between 200 and 600 watts to keep my house a comfortable 72 degrees. It's currently 93 outside.

Of course, ample house insulation helps too, but at this point, I'm amazed that so many people live in efficiency shirt-holes that they pay an arm and a leg to keep comfortable.
 
2014-07-12 05:37:12 PM  

ArkAngel: So someone without an AC happens to have a two-inch hole saw drill bit?


There are places in the USA where most people don't bother installing AC because they only need it 2 or 3 days a year.
 
2014-07-12 06:08:11 PM  

elbows_deep_silent_queef: What about filling it with dry ice? That way, when it sublimates, you can happily die from poisoning/hypoxia! But you'll die cool. Yay science!


That's exactly what I used. When my AC went out earlier this season (and it was going to be a week before the new unit came in) I tried this. I had about five pounds of dry ice left over from one of my Mad Science shows and used that to great effect. Actually had to pull the covers on.
 
2014-07-12 06:09:52 PM  

drjekel_mrhyde: ArkAngel: So someone without an AC happens to have a two-inch hole saw drill bit?

I think it would be good for camping(if you have a ac outlet).


I have a battery operated fan that I use when I'm out clowning. That's the fan I used when I did this back in May.
 
2014-07-12 06:46:40 PM  

crotchgrabber: Lsherm: insano: What do you mean, no? How much more energy do you think is drawn by adding ice above the energy normally used by the fridge with no ice? Put a wattage on it. Estimate.

12-20% on top of regular fridge usage.  For an 800 watt fridge, that means you're running the equivalent of two lamps with 80 watt light bulbs just to make ice all day every day, or one 160W halogen flood lamp.

As it turns out it's not the ice making that increases the power usage, it's the mechanized arm that pushes the ice cubes out.

So, if you just use ice cube trays instead of the automatic thing?
I always thought a fridge/freezer that had more in it ran more efficiently once everything inside cooled off.


I'd think the air flow gets restricted when the fridge is loaded up.
 
2014-07-12 07:23:26 PM  

insano: I'm not disagreeing with you there. But try and estimate the additional power you think turning water into ice uses above and beyond the base usage of an empty fridge/freezer. It's likely negligible compared to the base usage, and very negligible compared to the cost of running an air conditioner or even a fan for that matter.


The "base power" of the fridge is very small.  It needs a little (probably less than 50 watts) to power sensors and logic, and it could need power for other features like defrost cycle.

So, how much the compressor is running it nearly the whole story w.r.t. power usage.  If you make ice, the warm water causes the freezer air to rise in temperature faster and it turns on the refrigeration cycle more often.
 
2014-07-12 07:26:35 PM  

insano: What do you mean, no? How much more energy do you think is drawn by adding ice above the energy normally used by the fridge with no ice? Put a wattage on it. Estimate.


Wattage is power, not energy.
 
2014-07-12 08:30:35 PM  

Lsherm: insano: What do you mean, no? How much more energy do you think is drawn by adding ice above the energy normally used by the fridge with no ice? Put a wattage on it. Estimate.

12-20% on top of regular fridge usage.  For an 800 watt fridge, that means you're running the equivalent of two lamps with 80 watt light bulbs just to make ice all day every day, or one 160W halogen flood lamp.

As it turns out it's not the ice making that increases the power usage, it's the mechanized arm that pushes the ice cubes out.


The compressor uses the most power, the heater that warms the ice tray uses power but not that much.. the ice ejector mechanism is driven by a very small motor which uses a miniscule amount of power... I have a 3" vent from the supply duct under the refrigerator... removes heat much quicker from the refrigerator condenser coil, keeps the head pressure lower, and the compressor doesn't have to work as hard, so uses less power and has a shorter run cycle.
 
2014-07-12 09:41:57 PM  

insano: What do you mean, no? How much more energy do you think is drawn by adding ice above the energy normally used by the fridge with no ice? Put a wattage on it. Estimate.


50 or 60 watts to make a pound of ice in about an hour. Assuming perfect efficiency. That also happens to be about the average consumption of a smallish (18 CF), brand-new high-efficiency fridge. In other words, if your fridge is making a pound of ice an hour, it's using DOUBLE the power that it would just keeping its contents cold.

Of course, the heat that gets sucked out of that water to freeze it gets dumped into your house, along with some extra. Haul the ice into another room, and you can make that room a little bit cooler, but you're making your kitchen a little hotter.

If you could make enough ice in your fridge to cool an entire room, say from 85 degrees down to 75 degrees, you'd be raising the temp in your kitchen from 85 degrees to 95 degrees plus some extra, assuming the two rooms are the same size. But refrigerators can't move that much heat that quickly, so you won't be able to demonstrate this. Window A/C units can move that much heat, by drawing more power than the fridge. They also have the benefit of dumping the heat outside, rather than back into your house.
 
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