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(Gizmodo)   Oh hell no   (gizmodo.com) divider line 155
    More: Fail, Pee-wee's Playhouse, novelty item, popular cultures, industrial designer, Saved by the Bell, Memphis  
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23688 clicks; posted to Main » on 11 Jul 2014 at 12:13 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-11 11:58:01 PM  

Dumb-Ass-Monkey: the 80s were my formative years, and yet I never knew anyone who actually owned any furniture even remotely resembling what is shown in TFA. I know it existed, but it sh*t like that wasn't remotely as ubiquitous as they would have us believe.


So much this.

But I imagine Afros and hippie beads were not *quite* so prevalent in the 60s as is portrayed today. And not *everyone* was doing roller disco in bell bottoms or hot pants in the 70s, from what I can (barely) remember.

As usual, this stuff was the leading trend, design extremes owned by comparatively few. Mainstream America bought things that were influenced by these designs, but much toned down.

If the 80s all looked like this... the past would have been so bright we'd all have needed shades.
 
2014-07-12 12:07:04 AM  

Contrabulous Flabtraption: [i.kinja-img.com image 636x424]

[images.nymag.com image 560x375]


forget the colors and such.  it just looks uncomfortable to sit on.
 
2014-07-12 12:07:22 AM  

Jim_Callahan: I don't like it, no, but I think "hated" is a bit of a stretch.  Most people will see a couch and then farking sit on it, maybe one person in ten will actually even bother pondering the aesthetics involved.


You're right. But 10 out of 10 will be affected by the aesthetics involved, even if 9 of them aren't conscious of it. Just as we shape our environment, so we're also shaped by it, to a remarkable and often unconscious extent. Might be most obvious in studying urban planning and design.
 
2014-07-12 02:32:34 AM  

brimed03: If the 80s all looked like this... the past would have been so bright we'd all have needed shades.


We did need shades. We even wore them at night.
 
2014-07-12 03:13:32 AM  

brimed03: Dumb-Ass-Monkey: the 80s were my formative years, and yet I never knew anyone who actually owned any furniture even remotely resembling what is shown in TFA. I know it existed, but it sh*t like that wasn't remotely as ubiquitous as they would have us believe.

So much this.

But I imagine Afros and hippie beads were not *quite* so prevalent in the 60s as is portrayed today. And not *everyone* was doing roller disco in bell bottoms or hot pants in the 70s, from what I can (barely) remember.

As usual, this stuff was the leading trend, design extremes owned by comparatively few. Mainstream America bought things that were influenced by these designs, but much toned down.

If the 80s all looked like this... the past would have been so bright we'd all have needed shades.


Maybe not in rural America but in San Francisco, where I grew up, afros (white people and black people), hippie beads, garish roller skaters and so on were fairly common when they were the fad.

\also Puka shells, flowered shirts, disco balls etc.
 
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