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(NBC Washington)   Using a series of almost indecipherable pictographs, Ikea tells a guy they have a no-weapons policy and he'll have to leave his gun outside. Oh, did we mention the guy was a local chief of police and he was in uniform?   (nbcwashington.com) divider line 172
    More: Dumbass  
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7763 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jul 2014 at 9:44 PM (50 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-10 04:52:53 PM  
What was he doing in IKEA while on duty?

Oh, he was OFF Duty? Then follow the rules, You aren't special.
 
2014-07-10 05:59:34 PM  

mediablitz: What was he doing in IKEA while on duty?

Oh, he was OFF Duty? Then follow the rules, You aren't special.


This.

The 2nd Amendment is very clear. It says "CONGRESS SHALL PASS NO LAWS" infringing the right of the people to keep and bear arms, which is a natural one not granted by the government. However, another natural right is that of private property. You can make any rules you want on your private property and it's not for others to contest them. Don't like the rules? Don't come on the property.

I can say "All women must be in grass skirts and coconut bikinis, all men must wear loincloths and face paint, all children must somewhere else." for anyone visiting my Tropical Paradise restaurant. If you don't want to follow the dress code, no one's forcing you to go in. I'll either quickly go out of business or find a quirky subculture of would be Islanders. Either way, if it's my property, it's my choice not John Q Public's.

Same applies here. Ikea thinks banning guns is a good policy for their store. They CANNOT interfere with police officers in the execution of their lawful duty, but police are not special when off duty. They're just another body who has to follow the same rules the rest of us do or else.
 
2014-07-10 08:41:25 PM  
If he's not on duty then he's just a guy with a gun. It isn't necessary to be armed to buy some flatpack mdf with an indeterminate number of screws. He has the choice of shopping elsewhere or leaving his gun at home.

/Mynd you, those kids in the ball pit kan be pretty nasti though.
 
2014-07-10 09:48:24 PM  
Poe's law already in effect.
 
2014-07-10 09:48:31 PM  

doglover: mediablitz: What was he doing in IKEA while on duty?

Oh, he was OFF Duty? Then follow the rules, You aren't special.

This.

The 2nd Amendment is very clear. It says "CONGRESS SHALL PASS NO LAWS" infringing the right of the people to keep and bear arms, which is a natural one not granted by the government. However, another natural right is that of private property. You can make any rules you want on your private property and it's not for others to contest them. Don't like the rules? Don't come on the property.


No, it farking doesn't.
 
2014-07-10 09:50:50 PM  
This would have been an appropriate time to quote Chief Brody in Jaws: "I can do anything. I'm the chief of police."
 
2014-07-10 09:51:38 PM  
Keep in mind many departments require that their officers be armed 24/7 even when not actively working a shift. So this might not be a case of "just another guy with a gun" if his department has that rule.

However, trespassing and private property laws still absolutely apply to police when they are not actively working. If my brother in law tells me he doesn't want me to carry my duty weapon in his house, he has that right and can have me arrested for trespassing if he tells me to leave if I have a gun in his house, even though I am a cop. The same can apply to a private business. If a cop is not there on official duty, he can be asked to leave. He can be required by law to be armed 24/7 no matter where he goes, but that law does not say he can go wherever he wants. The property owner still has the right to refuse entry and service to whomever they choose.
 
2014-07-10 09:52:05 PM  
Chief Goldberg and Ikea remind us once more that when you see two people arguing, you shouldn't assume one of them is right.

Obviously, Ikea was moronic here. But the Chief brings a lot to that party:  "It isn't the most prudent thing to do to walk around the store in uniform with an empty holster," Goldberg said.

I go to Ikea unarmed  all the time.

/Maybe I'm just tougher.
//Maybe not.
 
2014-07-10 09:52:22 PM  

demaL-demaL-yeH: doglover: mediablitz: What was he doing in IKEA while on duty?

Oh, he was OFF Duty? Then follow the rules, You aren't special.

This.

The 2nd Amendment is very clear. It says "CONGRESS SHALL PASS NO LAWS" infringing the right of the people to keep and bear arms, which is a natural one not granted by the government. However, another natural right is that of private property. You can make any rules you want on your private property and it's not for others to contest them. Don't like the rules? Don't come on the property.

No, it farking doesn't.


It says shall not be infringed instead.

Sounds like the founders (who were quite liberal I might add) didn't think business owners or government should be able to infringe upon your right to keep and bear arms.
 
2014-07-10 09:53:15 PM  

taurusowner: Keep in mind many departments require that their officers be armed 24/7 even when not actively working a shift. So this might not be a case of "just another guy with a gun" if his department has that rule.

However, trespassing and private property laws still absolutely apply to police when they are not actively working. If my brother in law tells me he doesn't want me to carry my duty weapon in his house, he has that right and can have me arrested for trespassing if he tells me to leave if I have a gun in his house, even though I am a cop. The same can apply to a private business. If a cop is not there on official duty, he can be asked to leave. He can be required by law to be armed 24/7 no matter where he goes, but that law does not say he can go wherever he wants. The property owner still has the right to refuse entry and service to whomever they choose.


And all of that is a good thing.
 
2014-07-10 09:53:30 PM  
Sounds to me like he was treated like a regular citizen.  Instead of being outraged at how regular citizens are treated, he got all butt hurt because HE is supposed to be SPECIAL.

Welcome to the party pal!
 
2014-07-10 09:54:23 PM  
Thanks Obama....
 
2014-07-10 09:55:44 PM  
In between, he stopped at Ikea to shop for furniture for his daughter's new apartment.

You don't get to do your personal business in your uniform, princess.
 
2014-07-10 09:56:22 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: In between, he stopped at Ikea to shop for furniture for his daughter's new apartment.

You don't get to do your personal business in your uniform, princess.


How else are they going to get a discount?
 
2014-07-10 09:56:30 PM  
Dress code issue. If the department says a uniformed cop is to be armed, yada yada, Ikea is being kooky.
 
2014-07-10 09:56:32 PM  
And that's when a loss-prevention officer at the store approached him.

Don't you have some losing to prevent?
 
2014-07-10 09:57:59 PM  
"It isn't the most prudent thing to do to walk around the store in uniform with an empty holster," Goldberg said. "And I am not going to lock my gun in a commercial parking lot, with people watching me put it in there. That's just ludicrous."


OK. How about you go home and change clothes?
 
2014-07-10 09:58:12 PM  
I swear, sometimes this place is like the septic tank of the Internet.
 
2014-07-10 09:58:38 PM  

Giltric: demaL-demaL-yeH: doglover: mediablitz: What was he doing in IKEA while on duty?

Oh, he was OFF Duty? Then follow the rules, You aren't special.

This.

The 2nd Amendment is very clear. It says "CONGRESS SHALL PASS NO LAWS" infringing the right of the people to keep and bear arms, which is a natural one not granted by the government. However, another natural right is that of private property. You can make any rules you want on your private property and it's not for others to contest them. Don't like the rules? Don't come on the property.

No, it farking doesn't.

It says shall not be infringed instead.

Sounds like the founders (who were quite liberal I might add) didn't think business owners or government should be able to infringe upon your right to keep and bear arms.


*looks at Amendment II again*
"A well regulated militia"
I expect to see your doughy ass at drill, then.
 
2014-07-10 09:59:11 PM  

Captain Horatio Mindblower: Chief Goldberg and Ikea remind us once more that when you see two people arguing, you shouldn't assume one of them is right.

Obviously, Ikea was moronic here. But the Chief brings a lot to that party:  "It isn't the most prudent thing to do to walk around the store in uniform with an empty holster," Goldberg said.

I go to Ikea unarmed  all the time.

/Maybe I'm just tougher.
//Maybe not.


Why? It's private property, and I'm irritated that just because someone is a cop that they should get a free pass all the time. Though the followup is:

IKEA: "We regret that there was a misunderstanding of our weapon policy in our College Park Store. Our weapon policy does not apply to law enforcement officers. We are taking steps to ensure that this is clear for all our co-workers."
"Goldberg, who was so angry at the store's response Friday that he posted about it on Facebook, said Monday that response satisfies him."
A cop posted on Facebook about this? Makes me question his judgement. He should have followed the chain of command and have it handled my his superiors. Instead he acts like an upset 14 year old, and posts it to FB.
 
2014-07-10 10:00:41 PM  
For God's sake, Farking don't take a service dog into that store.
 
2014-07-10 10:00:57 PM  
If a private company bans weapons on private property then you can't bring guns on private property police included
 
2014-07-10 10:02:05 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-07-10 10:02:30 PM  
Good. Off-duty cops shouldn't have special rules applied to them. But of course, IKEA later clarified that they do treat cops differently.
 
2014-07-10 10:02:33 PM  

Giltric: Sounds like the founders (who were quite liberal I might add) didn't think business owners or government should be able to infringe upon your right to keep and bear arms.


Sounds to me that the founders were thinking about the issue in regards to how it relates to militias, which we don't have anymore, and therefore that part of the constitution is horribly out of date and shouldn't be taken as scripture.
 
2014-07-10 10:03:30 PM  

Nabb1: I swear, sometimes this place is like the septic tank of the Internet.


Yes. That's why we're here. Together.
 
2014-07-10 10:03:50 PM  

vudukungfu: For God's sake, Farking don't take a service dog into that store.


This has potential: Walking around armed in public for no good reason is a disability.
/Mental, but a disability nonetheless.
 
2014-07-10 10:03:51 PM  

Beerbarian: Sounds to me like he was treated like a regular citizen.  Instead of being outraged at how regular citizens are treated, he got all butt hurt because HE is supposed to be SPECIAL.

Welcome to the party pal!


Yep. That's about it. Do I think Ikea is smart to deny people who carry firearms? Nope. I fully support both open and concealed carry and think Ikea, Chipotle, Starbucks, etc all should gladly allow law abiding citizens with guns to frequent their places of business. But if they choose not to, that is their right as the property owner. Just like a "no shirt no shoes no service" sign. They can set the rules for entering their property and have you cited or arrested for trespassing if you enter anyways. Now if an officer is on duty and is called to the location, other laws come into play that can supersede private property laws to an extend. There are well established and accepted exceptions to those laws. Police may enter private property if invited, if there is an emergency, if there is evidence of a crime in plain view etc. That applies while on duty and carrying out the role of a peace officer. But once your shift is over, even if you are required to have your gun with you at all times, like I am, you still need to follow all the same rules as Joe Citizen until your next shift starts.

The real issue is whether he was on duty or not at the time. If not, they can kick him out whenever they want and he is required to follow the same laws he enforces. If he was on duty, only something duty related gives him the authority to enter the property without permission, invitation, or consent. And that doesn't appear to be the case. So while I do not agree with Ikea in principle, they were still following their lawful policy and the chief is obligated to respect that until such a time where his duties as a peace officer give him the authority to do otherwise.
 
2014-07-10 10:04:19 PM  

Giltric: Sounds like the founders (who were quite liberal I might add) didn't think business owners or government should be able to infringe upon your right to keep and bear arms.


If Tommy Jefferson has a problem with my banning of firearms in my business or other private property, he can dig himself up and kiss my treasonous ass.
 
2014-07-10 10:06:27 PM  

ThisIsntMe: "It isn't the most prudent thing to do to walk around the store in uniform with an empty holster," Goldberg said. "And I am not going to lock my gun in a commercial parking lot, with people watching me put it in there. That's just ludicrous."


OK. How about you go home and change clothes?


This. I personally hate wearing my uniform off duty. I'm not a big fan of making myself a target for getting spit in my food, called an asshole by people driving by, or making myself a target of crime without a radio to call appropriate backup. Keep some civilian clothes in you locker, car, or in your office if you're a chief. It takes 5 minutes to change, if that.
 
2014-07-10 10:06:36 PM  

demaL-demaL-yeH: Giltric: demaL-demaL-yeH: doglover: mediablitz: What was he doing in IKEA while on duty?

Oh, he was OFF Duty? Then follow the rules, You aren't special.

This.

The 2nd Amendment is very clear. It says "CONGRESS SHALL PASS NO LAWS" infringing the right of the people to keep and bear arms, which is a natural one not granted by the government. However, another natural right is that of private property. You can make any rules you want on your private property and it's not for others to contest them. Don't like the rules? Don't come on the property.

No, it farking doesn't.

It says shall not be infringed instead.

Sounds like the founders (who were quite liberal I might add) didn't think business owners or government should be able to infringe upon your right to keep and bear arms.

*looks at Amendment II again*
"A well regulated militia"
I expect to see your doughy ass at drill, then.


Ascots and spats? Im game.
 
2014-07-10 10:08:14 PM  
The right to bear arms does not protect you from the *consequences* of bearing arms.

/amidoingitright?
 
2014-07-10 10:08:19 PM  

Richard Roma: Giltric: Sounds like the founders (who were quite liberal I might add) didn't think business owners or government should be able to infringe upon your right to keep and bear arms.

Sounds to me that the founders were thinking about the issue in regards to how it relates to militias, which we don't have anymore, and therefore that part of the constitution is horribly out of date and shouldn't be taken as scripture.


Yes the constitution is so out of vogue.  who needs silly things like "freedom of speech, or of the press" and freedom or religion and the right to be "secure in one's persons, houses, possessions, papers and affects against unreasonable search and seizure".  Just a bunch of outdated words written by a bunch of stupid old white men.
 
2014-07-10 10:08:26 PM  
Yeah... the amount of farks I give about Chief Wiggums feelings being hurt is a number approximating zero.

He wasn't on duty, he was just in uniform. But that makes him special, or something. In any case, it was a mistake, and he's still butt hurt about it.

This is how tough the guys are that pretend to be tough guys these days. Someone should send him a box of Tampax.
 
2014-07-10 10:09:49 PM  
I would normally side with IKEA on this, but uniformed cops are different. Yeah, yeah, he was off duty I get that. The town that I grew up in, people were happy to give police their business, and have them stay as long as possible. Police used to mean something different when I was younger. Now, my dad is a cop and even he tells me not to talk to other cops. He is constantly disappointed when his coworkers act like savages. It's pretty depressing to see someone like my father wince when people ask him about what they've heard in the news, and know that he isn't involved, but still feels responsible.
 
2014-07-10 10:10:07 PM  

fusillade762: And that's when a loss-prevention officer at the store approached him.

Don't you have some losing to prevent?


Something Something Brazil Something Something.

Waaaaay too lazy to make that shiatty joke properly, sorry.
 
2014-07-10 10:11:48 PM  

Bathysphere: I would normally side with IKEA on this, but uniformed cops are different. Yeah, yeah, he was off duty I get that. The town that I grew up in, people were happy to give police their business, and have them stay as long as possible. Police used to mean something different when I was younger. Now, my dad is a cop and even he tells me not to talk to other cops. He is constantly disappointed when his coworkers act like savages. It's pretty depressing to see someone like my father wince when people ask him about what they've heard in the news, and know that he isn't involved, but still feels responsible.


True. They  should. But they don't  have to. Uniform or not, if you're not acting in your duties as a peace officer, no one is required to treat you as such. Yes, maybe they should. I agree that Ikea should have just let him in. But they still have the right not to.
 
2014-07-10 10:12:15 PM  

Richard Roma: Giltric: Sounds like the founders (who were quite liberal I might add) didn't think business owners or government should be able to infringe upon your right to keep and bear arms.

Sounds to me that the founders were thinking about the issue in regards to how it relates to militias, which we don't have anymore, and therefore that part of the constitution is horribly out of date and shouldn't be taken as scripture.


As recent as 2008 there has been a SCOTUS decision on the word "militia" which I believe is considered to be all able bodied men.
 
2014-07-10 10:12:20 PM  
"It isn't the most prudent thing to do to walk around the store in uniform with an empty holster," Goldberg said. "And I am not going to lock my gun in a commercial parking lot, with people watching me put it in there. That's just ludicrous."

I'm not sure if this is paranoia, a hatred of the public, or a general disdain of Ikea shoppers.
 
2014-07-10 10:14:13 PM  

beefoe: Richard Roma: Giltric: Sounds like the founders (who were quite liberal I might add) didn't think business owners or government should be able to infringe upon your right to keep and bear arms.

Sounds to me that the founders were thinking about the issue in regards to how it relates to militias, which we don't have anymore, and therefore that part of the constitution is horribly out of date and shouldn't be taken as scripture.

Yes the constitution is so out of vogue.  who needs silly things like "freedom of speech, or of the press" and freedom or religion and the right to be "secure in one's persons, houses, possessions, papers and affects against unreasonable search and seizure".  Just a bunch of outdated words written by a bunch of stupid old white men.


I must admit, "press" is an out of date term. Freedom of the dot matrix printer would be a bit more modern than press.
 
2014-07-10 10:14:18 PM  

taurusowner: Bathysphere: I would normally side with IKEA on this, but uniformed cops are different. Yeah, yeah, he was off duty I get that. The town that I grew up in, people were happy to give police their business, and have them stay as long as possible. Police used to mean something different when I was younger. Now, my dad is a cop and even he tells me not to talk to other cops. He is constantly disappointed when his coworkers act like savages. It's pretty depressing to see someone like my father wince when people ask him about what they've heard in the news, and know that he isn't involved, but still feels responsible.

True. They  should. But they don't  have to. Uniform or not, if you're not acting in your duties as a peace officer, no one is required to treat you as such. Yes, maybe they should. I agree that Ikea should have just let him in. But they still have the right not to.


And you are completely correct. I'm just kind of bummed.
/ And starting a sentence with 'and'.
 
2014-07-10 10:14:29 PM  

RaceBoatDriver: "It isn't the most prudent thing to do to walk around the store in uniform with an empty holster," Goldberg said. "And I am not going to lock my gun in a commercial parking lot, with people watching me put it in there. That's just ludicrous."


Sorry chief, but you could have just changed into civilian clothes and put that gun in a concealed holster like I an millions of other cops do every day. You chose to stand out and make yourself a target of attention and possible crime by wearing your uniform. Sucks you gotta deal with some repercussions for that, but it was your choice.
 
2014-07-10 10:15:08 PM  

Giltric: demaL-demaL-yeH: Giltric: demaL-demaL-yeH: doglover: mediablitz: What was he doing in IKEA while on duty?

Oh, he was OFF Duty? Then follow the rules, You aren't special.

This.

The 2nd Amendment is very clear. It says "CONGRESS SHALL PASS NO LAWS" infringing the right of the people to keep and bear arms, which is a natural one not granted by the government. However, another natural right is that of private property. You can make any rules you want on your private property and it's not for others to contest them. Don't like the rules? Don't come on the property.

No, it farking doesn't.

It says shall not be infringed instead.

Sounds like the founders (who were quite liberal I might add) didn't think business owners or government should be able to infringe upon your right to keep and bear arms.

*looks at Amendment II again*
"A well regulated militia"
I expect to see your doughy ass at drill, then.

Ascots and spats? Im game.


Welcome to Arizona. You're going to enjoy some fine Army training. You'll especially enjoy the CBRN training* / ruck march up Sabino Canyon. Don't forget to pack all of your gear - it will be inspected.

*Too bad your mask won't let you drink water.
 
2014-07-10 10:15:20 PM  
Sounds to me like the loss prevention officer is a wanna be cop who couldn't get into the police academy and was going out of his or her way to stick it to the uniformed cop.

Regardless of signage or on or off duty status, a cop in uniform should get a pass on a no gun policy.  Out of uniform and off duty, rules should apply.
 
2014-07-10 10:15:45 PM  

Nabb1: I swear, sometimes this place is like the septic tank of the Internet.


Aren't you glad your $5 was well spent?

Seriously though, if you think Fark.com is bad, don't go to 4chan/reddit/SomethingAwful/Facebook/YouTube. All of those have much darker, more septic corners (in their own special ways).
 
2014-07-10 10:17:23 PM  

mediablitz: What was he doing in IKEA while on duty?

Oh, he was OFF Duty? Then follow the rules, You aren't special.


Done in one.

Private property, assholes.
 
2014-07-10 10:17:36 PM  
Speaking as Devil's Advocate here, you do know the second an incident occurs, your "off-duty" officer is instantly on duty? If he doesn't have the means to protect himself or others, would you be willing in the case of a shooting or robbery instore to allow him to say "Sorry, man. Shift's over. Not my problem."
 
2014-07-10 10:18:21 PM  

demaL-demaL-yeH: Giltric: demaL-demaL-yeH: doglover: mediablitz: What was he doing in IKEA while on duty?

The 2nd Amendment is very clear. It says "CONGRESS SHALL PASS NO LAWS"


ahit says congress not ikea
don't get me wrong i wan't a cop with a gun all the time.hell if i had a gun i would stay away from a store like that if i had it on me or not. just in case "i forgot"
 
2014-07-10 10:18:34 PM  
i.imgur.com
i.imgur.com
 
2014-07-10 10:19:21 PM  

Giltric: Richard Roma: Giltric: Sounds like the founders (who were quite liberal I might add) didn't think business owners or government should be able to infringe upon your right to keep and bear arms.

Sounds to me that the founders were thinking about the issue in regards to how it relates to militias, which we don't have anymore, and therefore that part of the constitution is horribly out of date and shouldn't be taken as scripture.

As recent as 2008 there has been a SCOTUS decision on the word "militia" which I believe is considered to be all able bodied men.


Those of us who advocate reasonable regulation, such as a complete prohibition upon civilian ownership of civilian ownership of semi-automatic firearms, recognize that the Supreme Court is not always correct when deciding Constitutionality. We live by the wise advice of known Constitutional expert RAND PAUL.
 
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