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(The Weather Channel)   Lake Mead (that bunch of water behind the Hoover Dam) to fall to historic low, after back-to-back driest years in a century   ( weather.com) divider line
    More: Interesting  
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4705 clicks; posted to Main » on 10 Jul 2014 at 8:57 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-10 05:35:24 PM  
divert the missouri ?
HAHAH HAHAHAHHA
sigh
 
2014-07-10 05:52:24 PM  
OH NOES!!1!  GLOBAL DRYING!!1! Quick -give Algore teh moneys!!
 
2014-07-10 06:01:28 PM  
Is it a god damn?
 
2014-07-10 06:14:02 PM  
Still not low enough to kill the carp off that have taken over that lake.
 
2014-07-10 06:26:22 PM  

Angela Lansbury's Merkin: Still not low enough to kill the carp off that have taken over that lake.


But getting low enough that they it will fall below the level needed to generate electricity. How does perpetual rolling blackouts in LV sound?
 
2014-07-10 06:30:13 PM  

urger: Angela Lansbury's Merkin: Still not low enough to kill the carp off that have taken over that lake.

But getting low enough that they it will fall below the level needed to generate electricity. How does perpetual rolling blackouts in LV sound?


Sounds fine to me. I say let the whole southwest dry up and blow away. Stupid to think that we can support huge populations in the desert.
 
2014-07-10 06:40:03 PM  
Do rain dance.
 
2014-07-10 07:20:09 PM  
I'm worried that this may mean some of the suburbanites living out that way might have to forego the essential watering that keeps their lawns lush and green.
 
2014-07-10 09:01:34 PM  
Can't recall which news station I saw it on but it was mention the biggest water abuse were those that water their lawns and such
 
2014-07-10 09:01:41 PM  
Stop building sprawl in the dessert.
 
2014-07-10 09:03:24 PM  
Was it me or was that guy entirely to happy while doing that report?
 
2014-07-10 09:03:30 PM  

brokenhandle: Sounds fine to me. I say let the whole southwest dry up and blow away


Maybe the environmentalists should let us build some desalination plants instead of suing them over and over.

http://www.theecoreport.com/green-blogs/area/usa/california/the-west er n-hemispheres-largest-seawater-desalination-plant/
 
2014-07-10 09:05:13 PM  
Mock Vegas but when I lived there years ago during a recession they were recession proof and living there was cheap. Was nice that there was no state tax. Too bad the city got caught up in the real estate mess.

Vegas is a great city to live in. Just don't confuse it with North Las Vegas, which is its own city and is a shiathole.
 
2014-07-10 09:06:30 PM  

lordargent: brokenhandle: Sounds fine to me. I say let the whole southwest dry up and blow away

Maybe the environmentalists should let us build some desalination plants instead of suing them over and over.

http://www.theecoreport.com/green-blogs/area/usa/california/the-west er n-hemispheres-largest-seawater-desalination-plant/


Today's environmentalist's hate people. They don't say it, but it's the best explanation for their actions.
 
2014-07-10 09:08:26 PM  
Been there a few times, IIRC there really isn't any beaches. The only thing that lake is Good for is filming Fear Factor.
/we'll that and pissing off the dam just to see everyone's reaction.
//enjoy the water, Las Vegas
 
2014-07-10 09:10:20 PM  
I broke the dam.
 
2014-07-10 09:10:52 PM  
As usual people will start bringing up some harebrained theory about piping in water from the rest of the country to keep those desert cities running.

Its not going to happen. You can get my Midwestern water when you pry it out of my wet print hands.
 
2014-07-10 09:11:13 PM  

Giltric: Stop building sprawl in the dessert.


i.imgur.com
 
2014-07-10 09:11:36 PM  

CRtwenty: As usual people will start bringing up some harebrained theory about piping in water from the rest of the country to keep those desert cities running.

Its not going to happen. You can get my Midwestern water when you pry it out of my wet print hands.


That was supposed to say pruny
 
2014-07-10 09:13:00 PM  

CRtwenty: CRtwenty: As usual people will start bringing up some harebrained theory about piping in water from the rest of the country to keep those desert cities running.

Its not going to happen. You can get my Midwestern water when you pry it out of my wet print hands.

That was supposed to say pruny


This. fark you guys, I may not be able to overthrow the government, but ya'll come after my water, things'll get shooty.
 
2014-07-10 09:15:04 PM  

lordargent: brokenhandle: Sounds fine to me. I say let the whole southwest dry up and blow away

Maybe the environmentalists should let us build some desalination plants instead of suing them over and over.

http://www.theecoreport.com/green-blogs/area/usa/california/the-west er n-hemispheres-largest-seawater-desalination-plant/


Transporting water from the ocean to Vegas will cost a FORTUNE and use lots of energy probably from fossil fuels.
 
2014-07-10 09:15:27 PM  

skinink: Mock Vegas but when I lived there years ago during a recession they were recession proof and living there was cheap. Was nice that there was no state tax. Too bad the city got caught up in the real estate mess.

Vegas is a great city to live in. Just don't confuse it with North Las Vegas, which is its own city and is a shiathole.


Truth. Wife and I lived there a while back for about a year or so up in west Las Vegas. Awesome place to live. Never went to the strip much unless we had out of town guests. Incredible restaurants all over. Huge streets and police everywhere. North Las Vegas, yikes! Wouldn't go there on a dare!
 
2014-07-10 09:17:03 PM  
weknowmemes.com
 
2014-07-10 09:17:06 PM  

Kit Fister: CRtwenty: CRtwenty: As usual people will start bringing up some harebrained theory about piping in water from the rest of the country to keep those desert cities running.

Its not going to happen. You can get my Midwestern water when you pry it out of my wet print hands.

That was supposed to say pruny

This. fark you guys, I may not be able to overthrow the government, but ya'll come after my water, things'll get shooty.


There was a story on here not too long ago about a Real American Patriot that diverted a stream to build a fishing resort, and I recall people defending him quite loudly
 
2014-07-10 09:19:26 PM  
STOP WATERING THE DESERTS OF L.A. AND L.V.!
 
2014-07-10 09:20:25 PM  
(SamKinison.jpg)
 
2014-07-10 09:23:17 PM  

MFAWG: There was a story on here not too long ago about a Real American Patriot that diverted a stream to build a fishing resort, and I recall people defending him quite loudly


RAP? Really? Well that explains a lot, I thought it was just a bunch of 'them people' acting out. Who knew?
 
2014-07-10 09:24:13 PM  
I'm not a scientist. I'm not a chemist.

But I do wonder why it is so difficult -- apparently on the molecular level -- to make lots of fresh water out of lots of salt water. You'd think there'd be some basic process that would essentially suck the salt right away easily and cheaply.

Is it because salt and water are two elements that combine so easily themselves, such that to separate them would be like separating the peanut butter from the jelly in a PB&J sandwich?
 
2014-07-10 09:26:29 PM  

Guelph35: (SamKinison.jpg)


Thanx, that's what that needed.

img.fark.net
 
2014-07-10 09:26:45 PM  
I would like to thank stubby for pointing out that there is water on one side of a dam and it has a name.
Good job
 
2014-07-10 09:27:45 PM  

Huck And Molly Ziegler: But I do wonder why it is so difficult -- apparently on the molecular level -- to make lots of fresh water out of lots of salt water. You'd think there'd be some basic process that would essentially suck the salt right away easily and cheaply.


Right now, it's fairly expensive and energy intensive, and that's before you get to the issue of transporting it inland.
 
2014-07-10 09:28:45 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: STOP WATERING THE DESERTS OF L.A. AND L.V.!


Whoa, hold up there cowboy. We'll just allocate some other water. I always liked the word allocate, there's no indication of the theft and corruption it stands for.
 
2014-07-10 09:29:51 PM  
thanks Al Gore
 
2014-07-10 09:30:14 PM  
Pictures from March

i92.photobucket.com

i92.photobucket.com

i92.photobucket.com

Still beautiful, but it's drying up. And every lake in the west is like that.
 
2014-07-10 09:31:21 PM  

12349876: Huck And Molly Ziegler: But I do wonder why it is so difficult -- apparently on the molecular level -- to make lots of fresh water out of lots of salt water. You'd think there'd be some basic process that would essentially suck the salt right away easily and cheaply.

Right now, it's fairly expensive and energy intensive, and that's before you get to the issue of transporting it inland.


No worries, we'll just freeze it into ice aircraft carriers and get a running start. Aim it through LA and we can solve another couple of problems.
 
2014-07-10 09:32:16 PM  

12349876: Transporting water from the ocean to Vegas will cost a FORTUNE and use lots of energy probably from fossil fuels.


Ironically, the water from lake Mead goes to states that are near the ocean.

img.deseretnews.com

Only 2 percent is allocated to Nevada vs 27% for California.
(also, a population of about 3 million vs a population of 38 million).

If we got enough desal plants built in CA, we wouldn't need that water.

// Buuuuut, fish might die!
 
2014-07-10 09:32:18 PM  
Actually that's Lake Powell, but close enough. And it's prettier than Lake Mead. Lake Mead looks like crap, even when it has water in it.
 
2014-07-10 09:32:25 PM  
When does the mass exodus from Vegas begin?
 
2014-07-10 09:32:29 PM  

Huck And Molly Ziegler: I'm not a scientist. I'm not a chemist.

But I do wonder why it is so difficult -- apparently on the molecular level -- to make lots of fresh water out of lots of salt water. You'd think there'd be some basic process that would essentially suck the salt right away easily and cheaply.

Is it because salt and water are two elements that combine so easily themselves, such that to separate them would be like separating the peanut butter from the jelly in a PB&J sandwich?


Energy.  Distilling water takes a farkton of heat, plus more energy to extract that heat and condense steam back into liquid.

Reverse osmosis takes less energy, but it's still not trivial for these amounts, and scaling up takes a lot of engineering.
 
2014-07-10 09:33:19 PM  
well, "state" near the ocean, vs "states" :P
 
2014-07-10 09:33:31 PM  
I just got done with a replay of Fallout: New Vegas with all the DLCs that had come out in the last few years.

Took over the strip. Killed Mr House. Wiped out the Legion AND the Khans, kicked NCR back west where they belong.

So, yea, I know what and where Lake Mead is. I just fished a crashed & sunken B-29 off the bottom of it the other day.

/game nerd
 
2014-07-10 09:33:46 PM  

InterruptingQuirk: Guelph35: (SamKinison.jpg)

Thanx, that's what that needed.

[img.fark.net image 572x428]


Glad he's dead. Awful comic.
 
2014-07-10 09:35:20 PM  

Huck And Molly Ziegler: I'm not a scientist. I'm not a chemist.

But I do wonder why it is so difficult -- apparently on the molecular level -- to make lots of fresh water out of lots of salt water. You'd think there'd be some basic process that would essentially suck the salt right away easily and cheaply.

Is it because salt and water are two elements that combine so easily themselves, such that to separate them would be like separating the peanut butter from the jelly in a PB&J sandwich?


I've often wondered about a solar concentrator array, heating a boiler full of salt water to spin a turbine which would produce electricity, then reclaiming the condensed fresh water and using the generated power to pump more salt water from the ocean.  You're left with the problem of removing quantities of salt from a boiler, but you could potentially do that at night.

There are probably a hundred other problems with that idea, but it'd be interesting to try.
 
2014-07-10 09:37:17 PM  
Here's Lake Mead.

lh3.ggpht.com

And here's Elephant Butte Lake, which is in southern/mid New Mexico. It's just about gone.

lh3.ggpht.com

Now I am no water expert, but we could be in trouble here.
 
2014-07-10 09:39:01 PM  

lordargent: Ironically, the water from lake Mead goes to states that are near the ocean.


In my low cost of living area, a treatment plant and 31 mile pipeline was built to support the existing infrastructure during droughts.  It came with an 18 percent rate hike followed by a 29 percent rate hike a year later followed by a 10 percent hike 3 years after that.  That doesn't include the costs of building a running a desal plant and 31 miles doesn't even get you close to the Inland Empire.
 
2014-07-10 09:39:14 PM  

cryinoutloud: Pictures from March

Still beautiful, but it's drying up. And every lake in the west is like that.


Plenty of water in Portland and Seattle.
 
2014-07-10 09:40:20 PM  

Huck And Molly Ziegler: I'm not a scientist. I'm not a chemist.

But I do wonder why it is so difficult -- apparently on the molecular level -- to make lots of fresh water out of lots of salt water. You'd think there'd be some basic process that would essentially suck the salt right away easily and cheaply.

Is it because salt and water are two elements that combine so easily themselves, such that to separate them would be like separating the peanut butter from the jelly in a PB&J sandwich?


It's less anything particularly special about salt and water and more the difficulty of separating any solvent and solution. You're fighting entropy.

The traditional method was boiling sea water and recondensing the water vapor, but boiling water consumes a ton of fuel. There's a reason that even when salt was worth a fortune it was rarely produced this way.

Nowadays you put the sea water in a vacuum chamber to lower the boiling point, so it takes much less but still impressive amounts of energy. Or you can push it through a membrane that only passes water, not salt, but the operative word is push, which means energy. Left to its own devices the pure water wants to flow in to mix with the salt water.
 
2014-07-10 09:43:35 PM  

haydenarrrrgh: You're left with the problem of removing quantities of salt from a boiler,


Scrape the salt out, sell it as pricey sea salt :P
 
2014-07-10 09:45:55 PM  

CRtwenty: As usual people will start bringing up some harebrained theory about piping in water from the rest of the country to keep those desert cities running.

Its not going to happen. You can get my Midwestern water when you pry it out of my wet print hands.




The Great Lakes are an economic dead zone, let's suck it out of there
 
2014-07-10 09:48:01 PM  

cryinoutloud: Here's Lake Mead.

[lh3.ggpht.com image 640x431]

And here's Elephant Butte Lake, which is in southern/mid New Mexico. It's just about gone.

[lh3.ggpht.com image 640x431]

Now I am no water expert, but we could be in trouble here.


Wow, that's AMAZING how similar those two lakes look. What are the chances?..
 
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