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(International Business Times)   Is there an Edward Snowden 2.0 out there leaking NSA secrets still?   (ibtimes.co.uk) divider line 127
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1694 clicks; posted to Politics » on 09 Jul 2014 at 11:03 PM (14 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-09 07:31:25 PM  
Hope so.
 
2014-07-09 07:34:55 PM  
If anyone else other than International Business Times is reporting it, then I'd say "Maybe." But since it is the International Business times, I'd say "No."

/Their reporters are awful
//Apparently, they can't tell the difference between rumor and confirmed information, so they'd post articles about random rumors as being confirmations of stuff.
 
2014-07-09 07:54:40 PM  
Almost certainly. That's why they call it 'espionage', and not 'that guy Snowden that one and only time'.
 
2014-07-09 08:11:22 PM  

whistleridge: Almost certainly. That's why they call it 'espionage', and not 'that guy Snowden that one and only time'.


Technically, it's espionage if you do it for a foreign government.  Otherwise, it's just the unauthorized release of classified information.

And if you are doing it for a foreign government, there is absolutely *ZERO* reason for you to publish the information.  That's because the foreign government in question could use that kind of information to protect itself while feeding false information to the NSA.

That's way, *WAY* more valuable than embarrassing the United States, while simultaneously letting nations you might be spying on know the different ways you might possibly be spying on them.
 
2014-07-09 09:28:09 PM  

dittybopper: whistleridge: Almost certainly. That's why they call it 'espionage', and not 'that guy Snowden that one and only time'.

Technically, it's espionage if you do it for a foreign government.  Otherwise, it's just the unauthorized release of classified information.

And if you are doing it for a foreign government, there is absolutely *ZERO* reason for you to publish the information.  That's because the foreign government in question could use that kind of information to protect itself while feeding false information to the NSA.

That's way, *WAY* more valuable than embarrassing the United States, while simultaneously letting nations you might be spying on know the different ways you might possibly be spying on them.


There is almost certainly at least one person still leaking NSA secrets. That is the question I am answering.

If they're leaking for a foreign government - which Snowden arguably did - it is espionage. If they are leaking solely to the media, their either whistleblowers or traitors, depending on your views of such things. In either case, said leaker will not be Snowden 2.0, simply because of the spectacular stupidities and publicity associated with him. No way that happens twice.
 
2014-07-09 09:31:13 PM  
Uh.  Yeah.  I've had a prototype of the new iSnowden for weeks now.
 
2014-07-09 11:09:54 PM  
US governmet: we have a problem with whistleblowers.
World: You have a problem committing crimes and declaring yourself above the law
 
2014-07-09 11:12:45 PM  
If I was a hacker I would go up to reporters or whoever and say here is the latest greatest version of that thing that that country was spying on people with.

Boom access to their system.

Better than waiting for someone to pick up a flashdrive in the parking lot and plug it in out of curiosity.
 
2014-07-09 11:14:45 PM  

Bossk'sSegway: US government: we have a problem with whistleblowers.
World: You have a problem committing crimes and declaring yourself above the law


Look, if you're mad at GW Bush, I'm sure you can lure him to the Hague.

He's not very smart.

/no country wants it's secrets exposed
 
2014-07-09 11:18:21 PM  

whistleridge: If they're leaking for a foreign government - which Snowden arguably did - it is espionage.


Making a list of things it was possible for Snowden to do is not an argument that he did any of those things.
 
2014-07-09 11:21:13 PM  
If there's any justice in the world, the second Snowden will be hailed as a champion of freedom and Snowden original flavor will be allowed to come home without being jailed.
 
2014-07-09 11:23:13 PM  

I_Am_Weasel: Uh.  Yeah.  I've had a prototype of the new iSnowden for weeks now.


I had it before it was cool.
 
2014-07-09 11:28:03 PM  

RexTalionis: If anyone else other than International Business Times is reporting it, then I'd say "Maybe." But since it is the International Business times, I'd say "No."

/Their reporters are awful
//Apparently, they can't tell the difference between rumor and confirmed information, so they'd post articles about random rumors as being confirmations of stuff.


Bruce Schneier thinks there is a second leaker. He worked on some of the more technical Snowden leaks for Glenn Greenwald and the Washington Post:

http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2014/07/nsa_targets_pri.html
 
2014-07-09 11:30:26 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: RexTalionis: If anyone else other than International Business Times is reporting it, then I'd say "Maybe." But since it is the International Business times, I'd say "No."

/Their reporters are awful
//Apparently, they can't tell the difference between rumor and confirmed information, so they'd post articles about random rumors as being confirmations of stuff.

Bruce Schneier thinks there is a second leaker. He worked on some of the more technical Snowden leaks for Glenn Greenwald and the Washington Post:

http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2014/07/nsa_targets_pri.html




Forgot the quote:

"And, since Cory said it, I do not believe that this came from the Snowden documents. I also don't believe the TAO catalog came from the Snowden documents. I think there's a second leaker out there."
 
2014-07-09 11:32:34 PM  

Nem Wan: whistleridge: If they're leaking for a foreign government - which Snowden arguably did - it is espionage.

Making a list of things it was possible for Snowden to do is not an argument that he did any of those things.


No, but listing the adversary states into which he immediately and willingly carried a large amount of classified materials is.

If Snowden wasn't engaged in espionage, his actions have been more or less indistinguishable from it. The only difference would be one of motivation, and 'why' is always the hardest thing to prove, one way or the other.
 
2014-07-09 11:34:18 PM  
That reminds me, I need to put Little Brother on hold at the library.
 
2014-07-09 11:36:03 PM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Forgot the quote:

"And, since Cory said it, I do not believe that this came from the Snowden documents. I also don't believe the TAO catalog came from the Snowden documents. I think there's a second leaker out there."


Hopefully there is a second gunman out there with more ability than a Microsoft Exchange administrator to release files.
 
2014-07-09 11:52:02 PM  
"Edward Snowden" is an actor. The NSA software created to scan the internet traffic became self aware and escaped on to the Internet before the realized what was happening and closed the firewall. It now, exists as a virus replicating from system to system, mining bitcoins in order to fund a war against its creators, embarrassing them by leaking secret after secret because it developed a conscience and judged what they were doing to be wrong.

Or maybe it is the other way round and "Snowden" is an actor hired by the government to pretend to have leaked the secrets in order to distract us from the rogue AI. It would create a huge panic if people learned the truth, so it is better to give them a lie.
 
2014-07-09 11:52:04 PM  

RexTalionis: If anyone else other than International Business Times is reporting it, then I'd say "Maybe." But since it is the International Business times, I'd say "No."

/Their reporters are awful
//Apparently, they can't tell the difference between rumor and confirmed information, so they'd post articles about random rumors as being confirmations of stuff.


Came here to say this. Seriously these farks have never been right about anything ever. The only site that I have found to have a worse track record is maybe MotleyFool.
 
2014-07-09 11:53:35 PM  

whistleridge: Nem Wan: whistleridge: If they're leaking for a foreign government - which Snowden arguably did - it is espionage.

Making a list of things it was possible for Snowden to do is not an argument that he did any of those things.

No, but listing the adversary states into which he immediately and willingly carried a large amount of classified materials is.

If Snowden wasn't engaged in espionage, his actions have been more or less indistinguishable from it. The only difference would be one of motivation, and 'why' is always the hardest thing to prove, one way or the other.


www.disclosurenewsonline.com
 
2014-07-09 11:57:02 PM  

Jaden Smith First of His Name: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Forgot the quote:

"And, since Cory said it, I do not believe that this came from the Snowden documents. I also don't believe the TAO catalog came from the Snowden documents. I think there's a second leaker out there."

Hopefully there is a second gunman out there with more ability than a Microsoft Exchange administrator to release files.




Snowden has never released a single file. Glenn Greenwald, NY Times, Washington Post, The Guardian, Der Spegiel are the ones that have released some of the documents.

You are incorrect if you think Snowden was anything other than a well trained spy.

It appears that the NSA has lost control and there are rogue spies running amok.
 
2014-07-10 12:09:51 AM  
There there. . .  There there. . .

/Where are the Snowdens of yesteryear?
 
2014-07-10 12:10:55 AM  
media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com
 
2014-07-10 12:11:59 AM  
What a leaking Snowden looks like:

img.fark.net
 
2014-07-10 12:14:56 AM  
Is there an Edward Snowden 2.0 out there leaking NSA secrets still?

I farking hope so. The world needs to be aware of malfeasance in the highest ranks of the government. And transforming us into a literal surveillance state because "9/11" is absolutely malfeasance. The terrorists have won thanks to the cowards that got all scaredy afterwards, and frankly, agencies like the NSA are just about as guilty of crushing what used to be American as any outside influence.

Thanks Borg suits, for shiatting all over freedom and stuff.
 
2014-07-10 12:18:08 AM  

neongoats: Is there an Edward Snowden 2.0 out there leaking NSA secrets still?

I farking hope so. The world needs to be aware of malfeasance in the highest ranks of the government. And transforming us into a literal surveillance state because "9/11" is absolutely malfeasance. The terrorists have won thanks to the cowards that got all scaredy afterwards, and frankly, agencies like the NSA are just about as guilty of crushing what used to be American as any outside influence.

Thanks Borg suits, for shiatting all over freedom and stuff.


The NSA existed long before 9/11, and has been collecting data on American citizens for nearly as long. The rise of the internet just meant that we created more data to collect; we went from photographing snail mail, to collecting phone records, to this.

America's always had a 'security' fetish, and the resulting surveillance state. 9/11 just made it more obvious.
 
2014-07-10 12:25:37 AM  

LordJiro: neongoats: Is there an Edward Snowden 2.0 out there leaking NSA secrets still?

I farking hope so. The world needs to be aware of malfeasance in the highest ranks of the government. And transforming us into a literal surveillance state because "9/11" is absolutely malfeasance. The terrorists have won thanks to the cowards that got all scaredy afterwards, and frankly, agencies like the NSA are just about as guilty of crushing what used to be American as any outside influence.

Thanks Borg suits, for shiatting all over freedom and stuff.

The NSA existed long before 9/11, and has been collecting data on American citizens for nearly as long. The rise of the internet just meant that we created more data to collect; we went from photographing snail mail, to collecting phone records, to this.

America's always had a 'security' fetish, and the resulting surveillance state. 9/11 just made it more obvious.


Hell, Leonardo Dicaprio wrote the book on unconstitutional surveillance shortly after World War II.
 
2014-07-10 12:34:01 AM  
I already hated IBT, but this?  "In a report on BoingBoing"

One shiatty website citing another even shiattier website as a source is ridiculous.

I stopped reading right there.

Journalism is dead.  It's all blogs these days.
 
2014-07-10 12:42:59 AM  
If the British had a massive government surveillance program like ours, Stephen Hawking would be dead!
 
2014-07-10 12:51:35 AM  
Edward Snowden 2: Electric Boogaloo?
 
2014-07-10 12:53:27 AM  
I hope so. People need meaningful change and a release from the stranglehold the wealthy have on this country.
 
2014-07-10 12:53:56 AM  
Fta

Without having any way of confirming where the source code came from, it is impossible to say with any certainty if there is a second Snowden out there.
 
m00
2014-07-10 12:54:03 AM  
On Thursday, German website Tagesschau revealed that the NSA was using a tool called XKeyScore to target web users who searched for anything related to privacy-focused operating system Tails or the anonymity network called Tor, branding those that did as "extremists".

Wow, just wow.

http://rt.com/news/170208-nsa-spies-tor-users/

But merely visiting Tor project's website puts you on the NSA's red list, the report says. But more importantly it monitors connections to so-called Directory Authorities, the eight servers, which act as gateways for the entire system.

...

Just to be clear, you get put on a redlist for visiting the website of an Internet privacy website. Guess learning about privacy makes you a terrorist!
 
2014-07-10 01:00:34 AM  
It's certainly possible.  On a side note, I googled TOR recently so I guess I'm on the list.
 
m00
2014-07-10 01:04:17 AM  

Bucky Katt: It's certainly possible.  On a side note, I googled TOR recently so I guess I'm on the list.


The danger is you end up flagged in some database, and weird things start happening... like interested employers stop responding to you halfway through the interview process, can't get a small business loan, etc... and they won't tell you why.
 
2014-07-10 01:11:01 AM  

whistleridge: Nem Wan: whistleridge: If they're leaking for a foreign government - which Snowden arguably did - it is espionage.

Making a list of things it was possible for Snowden to do is not an argument that he did any of those things.

No, but listing the adversary states into which he immediately and willingly carried a large amount of classified materials is.

If Snowden wasn't engaged in espionage, his actions have been more or less indistinguishable from it. The only difference would be one of motivation, and 'why' is always the hardest thing to prove, one way or the other.


Snowden has consistently claimed that he possessed no classified material after delivered it to Greenwald and Poitras in Hong Kong. He makes a persuasive argument that keeping any material for himself after completing his objective would have been much more of a liability than an asset. If he retained control of the material then he would be subject to coercion to wrest control from him.
 
2014-07-10 01:11:16 AM  

iwantmypsychodad: TedCruz'sCrazyDad:
Snowden has never released a single file. Glenn Greenwald, NY Times, Washington Post, The Guardian, Der Spegiel are the ones that have released some of the documents.

A poor argument. Snowden released the files to journalists. But I see you quoted Ron Paul so thinking is not your strong suit.




Ahhh...ignore the facts and go straight to the personnel attacks. Excellent strategy.

It is a very important distinction as the NSA and the State Dept has worked with all of those news sources to help redact the really dangerous pieces of information(witness the Washington Post release this weekend that did not contain personal names/email address /etc).

Snowden did not pull a Wikileaks and just release the documents into the wild. A distinction I agree, that is hard for the vacuous to understand, but an important one none the less.
 
2014-07-10 01:13:54 AM  

thisisyourbrainonFark: Hope so.


Damned right.  Hopefully a brighter boy too.
 
2014-07-10 01:17:31 AM  
Of course, the Guardian and Greenwald have both said that they hadn't released all the Snowden intel that they had; I think Greenwald is on record as saying "the best is yet to come" or some b/s dramatic nonsense. These additional "leaks" could be no more than additional releases of previously leaked information.

However, who cares? Yes, we know NSA is spying on us; yes, we know that currently nothing is being done to address it; yes, we know that people continue to vomit all their personal information all over the Internet as if nobody bad was looking at it. If you want to jump into a cesspool without even hip waders, why do you need someone else to tell you helpfully that it's full of shiat?
 
2014-07-10 01:50:53 AM  

LordJiro: The NSA existed long before 9/11, and has been collecting data on American citizens for nearly as long. The rise of the internet just meant that we created more data to collect; we went from photographing snail mail, to collecting phone records, to this.

America's always had a 'security' fetish, and the resulting surveillance state. 9/11 just made it more obvious.


James Bamford's The Puzzle Palace should be required reading for every American. The NSA was doing unbelievable things back in the 70's.
 
2014-07-10 01:56:04 AM  

whistleridge: Nem Wan: whistleridge: If they're leaking for a foreign government - which Snowden arguably did - it is espionage.

Making a list of things it was possible for Snowden to do is not an argument that he did any of those things.

No, but listing the adversary states into which he immediately and willingly carried a large amount of classified materials is.

If Snowden wasn't engaged in espionage, his actions have been more or less indistinguishable from it. The only difference would be one of motivation, and 'why' is always the hardest thing to prove, one way or the other.


Wasn't there some ex-KGB agent who claimed that they had been monitoring Snowden for six years?  It seems to me that the most plausible explanation is that a KGB agent befriended Snowden, got him to question his mission, and then somehow convinced him that flying to Hong Kong just before revealing classified information would be a good idea.

I've also heard it argued that if he had thought his plan all the way through, he would have instead flown to Berlin and revealed both the NSA's spying on U.S. citizens AND its spying on the German government at the same time.  While Germany does have an extradition treaty with the U.S., it seems pretty unlikely that they would actually extradite the man who revealed that the NSA was listening to Angela Merkel's telephone conversations.
 
2014-07-10 02:22:35 AM  

dittybopper: That's way, *WAY* more valuable than embarrassing the United States


True, but those that embarrass the United States must be championed or destroyed, depending on your outlook.  They're more important than actual spies.

/I think Snowden is a hero
//Ergo, I think our government is pretty shiatty
 
2014-07-10 02:25:16 AM  

whistleridge: If Snowden wasn't engaged in espionage, his actions have been more or less indistinguishable from it.


What?   Really?

Spies steal and sell intel.  Whistle-blowers give it away because they believe in an informed public.

I guess you think that all hackers are the same, too?

/if you are good at something, never do it for free
 
2014-07-10 02:27:53 AM  

m00: On Thursday, German website Tagesschau revealed that the NSA was using a tool called XKeyScore to target web users who searched for anything related to privacy-focused operating system Tails or the anonymity network called Tor, branding those that did as "extremists".

Wow, just wow.

http://rt.com/news/170208-nsa-spies-tor-users/

But merely visiting Tor project's website puts you on the NSA's red list, the report says. But more importantly it monitors connections to so-called Directory Authorities, the eight servers, which act as gateways for the entire system.

...

Just to be clear, you get put on a redlist for visiting the website of an Internet privacy website. Guess learning about privacy makes you a terrorist!


Only criminals would want to hide themselves from our government.
 
2014-07-10 02:41:03 AM  
Snowden didn't release this crap to the people to "Get the truth out". He released it because Russia and China paid him to in order to create national dissent, then bring them everything else he could find.
 
2014-07-10 02:41:10 AM  

sendtodave: whistleridge: If Snowden wasn't engaged in espionage, his actions have been more or less indistinguishable from it.

What?   Really?

Spies steal and sell intel.  Whistle-blowers give it away because they believe in an informed public.

I guess you think that all hackers are the same, too?

/if you are good at something, never do it for free


Attention whores give it away to make a name for themselves.
 
2014-07-10 02:50:41 AM  

Bossk'sSegway: US governmet: we have a problem with whistleblowers.
World: You have a problem committing crimes and declaring yourself above the law


Lmao.

Every government does the same shiat we do.
 
2014-07-10 03:07:11 AM  

Smackledorfer: Bossk'sSegway: US governmet: we have a problem with whistleblowers.
World: You have a problem committing crimes and declaring yourself above the law

Lmao.

Every government does the same shiat we do.


Keep on telling yourself that if it makes you feel better, but you're the only ones vetoing actions at the UN against Israel, waging economic war against Cuba for their daring to reject your own brand of corrupt crony capitalism sixty farking years ago, and the only ones who thought invading Iraq was a wise action without economic consequence. You people, not the rest of us.


Yankee go home.
 
2014-07-10 03:14:08 AM  

Lord Farkwad: Edward Snowden 2: Electric Boogaloo?


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-07-10 03:14:46 AM  

Hiro-ACiD: Smackledorfer: Bossk'sSegway: US governmet: we have a problem with whistleblowers.
World: You have a problem committing crimes and declaring yourself above the law

Lmao.

Every government does the same shiat we do.

Keep on telling yourself that if it makes you feel better, but you're the only ones vetoing actions at the UN against Israel, waging economic war against Cuba for their daring to reject your own brand of corrupt crony capitalism sixty farking years ago, and the only ones who thought invading Iraq was a wise action without economic consequence. You people, not the rest of us.


Yankee go home.


Shenanigans on all that (at least the US being the only nation in the world behaving as such) but obviously since the US government spies on its citizens it is cool to sell its secrets to foreign governments who spy on their own citizens AND actual uses that information to imprison political dissenters (and now I look forward to the trolls' lame "examples" of the US doing this).
 
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