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(Live Science)   Here's a bunch of history's unfairly overlooked scientists not named Nikola Tesla   (livescience.com) divider line 15
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5782 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jul 2014 at 9:31 PM (20 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-09 09:49:10 PM  
2 votes:
My submission:

upload.wikimedia.org

Paul Erdős

He is known for his prolific authorship (most mathematical papers ever), social practice of mathematics (more than 500 collaborators), and eccentric lifestyle (Time Magazine called him The Oddball's Oddball)

/go on, read the wiki page that I linked, it's worth it
2014-07-09 09:46:29 PM  
2 votes:
Didn't everyone have to learn about George Washington Carver in school?
2014-07-10 12:38:24 AM  
1 votes:
TedCruz'sCrazyDad:


<<snip>>>>


Bayer Aspirin was tested on Jewish prisoners and is the only thing to be in use today that was discovered in Concentration Camps.


Don't forget the Magic Time Machine that took them back to 1899, when Bayer first registered the trademark "Aspirin".  They lost that trademark to the winners of World War I, as part of reparations.
2014-07-09 11:10:28 PM  
1 votes:
Oh, what did Tesla really do?  Sure, he started that car company, but GM and Ford sell way more cars than his little group.  I don't even think you can put gas in his cars, so I think your range is limited to how long your extension cord is.
2014-07-09 10:28:12 PM  
1 votes:

FloridaWombat: revrendjim: jshine: revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.

There's no clear distinction between the two.

There is a large overlap but they are distinct. Scientists try to find the fundamental principles that make stuff work. Engineers use those principles to make stuff work.

The best distinction I have ever heard is: "Engineers ask 'how', Scientists ask 'why'.".  In terms of training and mindset, it is a fundamental difference that gets beaten in early and often.


If you ask a physicist where a formula came from you will get a history of the experimental evidence and a mathematical derivation. If you ask an engineer where a formula came from the answer will be "from the manual."
2014-07-09 10:00:11 PM  
1 votes:
This seemed less like a news article and more like a "Fight the Patriarchy" platitude...
2014-07-09 09:58:43 PM  
1 votes:

Bumblefark: Pfft. Everyone knows that girls can't science.


Oblig:

imgs.xkcd.com
2014-07-09 09:58:43 PM  
1 votes:

BalugaJoe: CruJones: Didn't everyone have to learn about George Washington Carver in school?

He discovered Peanut Butter.


Negitive; he discovered 110 uses for peanuts. Not a single one was peanut butter.
2014-07-09 09:55:39 PM  
1 votes:

Prey4reign: What about Josef Mengele?  He was a humble family doctor who did some breathtaking work into the field of genetics.  Boy, I tell you, you murder a few million humans and the world never forgets.


You see that church over there? I built it with my bare hands but do they call me O'Reilly the church builder? Nooo! 
You see that school over there? I taught there for 30 years but do they call me O'Reilly the educator? Nooo! 
But you fark one goat....
2014-07-09 09:54:28 PM  
1 votes:
So basically anyone who wasn't a project leader or didn't work alone. That was to be expected. I know an engineer who designed many of Motorola's phones between 1997 and 2001, all of which were patented by the company itself without his name attached; as is typical in that kind of R&D environment.
2014-07-09 09:50:12 PM  
1 votes:
George Washington Carver is overlooked? He invented something like 97 uses for peanuts and their shells. But, he didn't invent peanut butter.
2014-07-09 09:46:46 PM  
1 votes:

nmrsnr: revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.

That's not a relevant distinction, as far as I'm concerned. The fact that he was more applied than theoretical doesn't make him less science-y.

The list is pretty good, but it overlooks Hero of Alexandria.


It doesn't make him any less impressive. A guy who can visualize 3-phase power is some freaky kind of genius.
2014-07-09 09:35:46 PM  
1 votes:
rashmanly.files.wordpress.com
2014-07-09 09:30:20 PM  
1 votes:

revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.


That's not a relevant distinction, as far as I'm concerned. The fact that he was more applied than theoretical doesn't make him less science-y.

The list is pretty good, but it overlooks Hero of Alexandria.
2014-07-09 08:43:20 PM  
1 votes:
Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.
 
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