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(Live Science)   Here's a bunch of history's unfairly overlooked scientists not named Nikola Tesla   (livescience.com) divider line 77
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5784 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jul 2014 at 9:31 PM (23 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-09 10:50:41 PM  
Charles R. Drew figured out how to separate blood cells from plasma, allowing for blood to be transported and stored for transfusions, saving millions. He was also a doctor, and was black, in the 40's. Damn.

Although the popular myth that he died because he was refused equal treatment because of his skin color is not true - his injuries were just too severe.
 
2014-07-09 10:52:14 PM  

Bacontastesgood: Chach: She has a school named after her. Would that we all would wind up so "overlooked."

Yeah, but no chain of Bagel restaurants. That's the real mark of distinction.

Btw, I live in the Chicago area and know a lot of health/medical people and I have never heard of that place.  Plus it only got her name 10 years ago apparently.  Yeah, I knew who Franklin was long ago, but I was using x-rays.  Most people have never heard of her, or Meitner either, and she has an element.  My point is they and many of the others named could use more recognition.

revrendjim: That's a grey area. My dad was a physics PhD who supervised engineers. He lived in that grey area.

I work with both extensively.  Generally speaking scientists are better at the 'vision thing' and the real fundamentals.  Engineers are better at making stuff work properly and reliably and calling bullshiat on the scientists who are ignoring the fundamentals to 'dream big'.  Pure terms of either type suck.  Most projects go much better with both involved.


Most of my comments in this thread are stuff my recently departed dad said. But his team made stuff work. If you ever buy eyeglasses those lenses were probably made on one of his machines. But his engineers drove him crazy.
 
2014-07-09 11:10:28 PM  
Oh, what did Tesla really do?  Sure, he started that car company, but GM and Ford sell way more cars than his little group.  I don't even think you can put gas in his cars, so I think your range is limited to how long your extension cord is.
 
2014-07-09 11:16:09 PM  

CruJones: TedCruz'sCrazyDad: iheartscotch: BalugaJoe: CruJones: Didn't everyone have to learn about George Washington Carver in school?

He discovered Peanut Butter.

Negitive; he discovered 110 uses for peanuts. Not a single one was peanut butter.

Dr. John Harvey Kellogg was the first to patent a process to turn raw peanuts into peanut butter.

He invented the blender? It's not a real complicated process




Either is baking corn flakes and adding milk, but he made a fortune off of that too.
 
2014-07-09 11:24:49 PM  

radarlove: iheartscotch: Prey4reign: What about Josef Mengele?  He was a humble family doctor who did some breathtaking work into the field of genetics.  Boy, I tell you, you murder a few million humans and the world never forgets. The fun part? We used a lot of his quackery during the Cold War. We also took every single German engineer, scientist and technology guy we could get our grubby mitts on. Time was, you could shout "HEIL Hitler!" in NASA and get an entire room on its feet. We actually still use a lot of Mengele's data today, as well as some that was collected in similar experiments on American POWs conducted by the Japanese.  The data from both sets of experiments is still highly classified, but the results produced data that we absolutely can never get on our own with our set of laws and ethics.


There was zero medical data collected from the Japanese experiments and the US regretted giving them a pardon for war crimes.

There was nothing gained from Mengele's experiments either as he was obsessed with proving racial superiority of the aryan race (something Jesse Owens proved them wrong in 1936). Sewing together twins and performing surgery without any anesthesia is was not close to being science.

Bayer Aspirin was tested on Jewish prisoners and is the only thing to be in use today that was discovered in Concentration Camps.
 
2014-07-10 12:17:48 AM  
George Washington Carver is unsung?

On what planet? Because here on earth he is #3 after Einstein and Newton. He was even in the Tick's historical Dream Team.
 
2014-07-10 12:37:31 AM  

Point02GPA: Prey4reign: What about Josef Mengele?  He was a humble family doctor who did some breathtaking work into the field of genetics.  Boy, I tell you, you murder a few million humans and the world never forgets.

He should had used_________?


Preparation H?
 
2014-07-10 12:38:24 AM  
TedCruz'sCrazyDad:


<<snip>>>>


Bayer Aspirin was tested on Jewish prisoners and is the only thing to be in use today that was discovered in Concentration Camps.


Don't forget the Magic Time Machine that took them back to 1899, when Bayer first registered the trademark "Aspirin".  They lost that trademark to the winners of World War I, as part of reparations.
 
2014-07-10 01:12:11 AM  

Tyrosine: Barbara McClintock: mobile genetic elements (for which she was awarded the Noble Prize), role of centromeres and telomeres, crossing over.

[img.fark.net image 250x201]


we told you girls can't science...
 
2014-07-10 01:27:40 AM  

radarlove: [rashmanly.files.wordpress.com image 314x242]


What's Hedy Lamarr doing in this thread?
 
2014-07-10 01:33:42 AM  

Mr. Ekshun: radarlove: [rashmanly.files.wordpress.com image 314x242]

What's Hedy Lamarr doing in this thread?


Hedly
 
2014-07-10 01:40:43 AM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-07-10 02:08:06 AM  

revrendjim: This text is now purple: revrendjim: jshine: revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.

There's no clear distinction between the two.

There is a large overlap but they are distinct. Scientists try to find the fundamental principles that make stuff work. Engineers use those principles to make stuff work.

So what's applied science?

Because its not engineering.

That's a grey area. My dad was a physics PhD who supervised engineers. He lived in that grey area.


I'm a research engineer who works with applied scientists. There's a rather large difference between what we do. Mainly, we understand what vectors are. =)
 
2014-07-10 02:09:04 AM  
Konstantin Tsiolkovsky is only overlooked in the English-language media, if at all. I remember first reading about him in Italian family encyclopedias (yeah, yeah, lawn, etc...) decades ago.

Others missing from that list:
Clément Ader who flew a powered aircraft years before the Wright brothers.
Antonio Meucci, the true inventor of the telephone.
 
2014-07-10 02:12:07 AM  
Oliver Heaviside, He always gets left out.  He is like Tesla with more useful output and less crazy.
Some examples: Invented the coaxial cable, one of the developers of transmission line theory, skin effect, responsible for the vector forms of Maxwell's equations that we all know and love, came up with the Heaviside step function and independently developed Laplace transforms for solving differential equations, came up with the D operator for differential calculus,  " included a prediction of what is now known as Cherenkov Radiation " "first published a correct derivation of the magnetic force on a moving charged particle which is now called the Lorentz Force", He coined the terms "admittance, reluctance, conductance, impedance, and permeability" and much more.
 
2014-07-10 02:53:19 AM  
 
2014-07-10 08:08:36 AM  

iheartscotch: Prey4reign: What about Josef Mengele?  He was a humble family doctor who did some breathtaking work into the field of genetics.  Boy, I tell you, you murder a few million humans and the world never forgets.

The fun part? We used a lot of his quackery during the Cold War. We also took every single German engineer, scientist and technology guy we could get our grubby mitts on. Time was, you could shout "HEIL Hitler!" in NASA and get an entire room on its feet.


Yeah, it's funny that TFA mentions rocket science and not Werner von Braun.
 
2014-07-10 08:13:32 AM  

radarlove: Hollie Maea: TedCruz'sCrazyDad:

Dr. John Harvey Kellogg was the first to patent a process to turn raw peanuts into peanut butter.

He also breakfast cerealed us.

If he came back to life and saw Froot Loops and Coco Puffs he would nuke the whole world.

Actually his brother is the one who invented Corn Flakes.  Dr. John tried to fark him out of it in court and lost.


www.gonola.com
 
2014-07-10 11:05:40 AM  
All those women should have just stayed in the kitchen and made sammiches.
 
2014-07-10 11:15:03 AM  
I tell you waht, Leibniz and Newton get credit for calculus, but you know who gets ignored? Isaac Barrow. He was the first to occupy the Lucasian Chair of Mathematics at Cambridge and was also Master of Trinity College. Dude was the first one to figure out that an integral can be reversed by derivation - before Newton (who he taught) or Leibniz. He also spoke Hebrew, Latin, and Greek, fought Barbary pirates while on a cruise in the Mediterranean, was a close friend of Charles II, and is buried in Westminster Abbey.
 
2014-07-10 11:21:33 AM  
I'm unclear what the author means by "overlooked", because I have a hard time applying that label to one of the handful of people to have an element named for them.
 
2014-07-10 11:49:47 AM  

revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.


Utter horses--t. Tesla derived the math behind his inventions himself, did the lab work and the scale up.

I'm an engineer myself and he was a scientist (and a damn god engineer).
 
2014-07-10 12:27:25 PM  

Chach: (Don't say Rosalind Franklin)
(Don't say Rosalind Franklin)

*clicks link*

Oh for fark's sake.

PS She has a school named after her. Would that we all would wind up so "overlooked."


She was overlooked in the respect that she was the one who found proof of DNA's structure, but other people got credit (and the Nobel) for the work she did. It wasn't until after her death that her contributions were made known.

If that isn't a slap in the face, I don't know what is.
 
2014-07-10 12:36:12 PM  

traylor: My submission:

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x226]

Paul Erdős

He is known for his prolific authorship (most mathematical papers ever), social practice of mathematics (more than 500 collaborators), and eccentric lifestyle (Time Magazine called him The Oddball's Oddball)

/go on, read the wiki page that I linked, it's worth it


Not to mention Dirac.
 
2014-07-10 02:58:12 PM  
So when the author says "overlooked" he means "didn't get all the credit they should have, or didn't get it at the time they should have, even if they are quite well known now, have buildings and streets named after them, or in one case an eponymous element of the periodic table"?

Yes, some of these people got shafted, often by their closest collaborators, but some of these names have no business being on any kind of "overlooked" list. He has Grace Hopper for example - not only is it hard to find anybody in IT who doesn't know who she was, she was widely recognized and honored in her prime and throughout her life, not merely in retrospect. Hopper was awarded the inaugural "computer sciences man of the year" award from the DPMA in 1969, she was the first American as well as the first woman to be made a Distinguished Fellow by the BCS (1973), she had an award named after by the by the ACM in 1971... I could go on...
 
2014-07-10 10:59:17 PM  

revrendjim: jshine: revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.

There's no clear distinction between the two.

There is a large overlap but they are distinct. Scientists try to find the fundamental principles that make stuff work. Engineers use those principles to make stuff work.


Theoretically, yes.  ...but try doing one of those without also doing the other to a greater or lesser degree.

/ PhD in chemical engineering, postdoc, etc. -- I've lived in both worlds, and they are just different points on the same continuum
 
2014-07-10 11:10:22 PM  

Loreweaver: She was overlooked in the respect that she was the one who found proof of DNA's structure, but other people got credit (and the Nobel) for the work she did. It wasn't until after her death that her contributions were made known.


This simply isn't correct.  Her and Wilkins' work inspiring the tentative structure (not proving it) was published alongside the original Watson and Crick paper in Nature.  Same issue.  There was pushback from the whole scientific community about the DNA structure, and Wilkins continued doing x-ray crystallography on it for 10 years.  Franklin meanwhile moved on to lead her own lab and focused on RNA and virus structures.  She died soon after of cancer.  A few years later, the importance of the structures of the NAs were finally accepted and the Nobel was awarded.  Posthumous Nobels aren't given.

She contributed vitally and importantly to the work, and they screwed up in not citing her in the original paper, but it's not like she came up with the model herself, or had 100% of the necessary data, or was totally ignored and not given any credit whatsoever.
 
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