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(Live Science)   Here's a bunch of history's unfairly overlooked scientists not named Nikola Tesla   (livescience.com) divider line 77
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5770 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Jul 2014 at 9:31 PM (9 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-09 08:18:29 PM
My friend got kicked out of his program for teaching a lab class about Rosalind Franklin and her role in DNA crystallography.  He diverted from the lesson plan.
 
2014-07-09 08:43:20 PM
Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.
 
2014-07-09 09:30:20 PM

revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.


That's not a relevant distinction, as far as I'm concerned. The fact that he was more applied than theoretical doesn't make him less science-y.

The list is pretty good, but it overlooks Hero of Alexandria.
 
2014-07-09 09:35:46 PM
rashmanly.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-07-09 09:42:49 PM
upload.wikimedia.org

Only one nobel prize? Slackers.
 
2014-07-09 09:46:29 PM
Didn't everyone have to learn about George Washington Carver in school?
 
2014-07-09 09:46:46 PM

nmrsnr: revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.

That's not a relevant distinction, as far as I'm concerned. The fact that he was more applied than theoretical doesn't make him less science-y.

The list is pretty good, but it overlooks Hero of Alexandria.


It doesn't make him any less impressive. A guy who can visualize 3-phase power is some freaky kind of genius.
 
2014-07-09 09:48:06 PM
30.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-07-09 09:48:37 PM

CruJones: Didn't everyone have to learn about George Washington Carver in school?


Yeah, he's hardly overlooked. Same with Hoffman. In some circles at least.


Albert Hofmann (1906-2008): Swiss scientist who invented and tested the psychedelic drug LSD

Does an accidental discovery count as an invention?
 
2014-07-09 09:49:10 PM
My submission:

upload.wikimedia.org

Paul Erdős

He is known for his prolific authorship (most mathematical papers ever), social practice of mathematics (more than 500 collaborators), and eccentric lifestyle (Time Magazine called him The Oddball's Oddball)

/go on, read the wiki page that I linked, it's worth it
 
2014-07-09 09:50:12 PM
George Washington Carver is overlooked? He invented something like 97 uses for peanuts and their shells. But, he didn't invent peanut butter.
 
2014-07-09 09:50:15 PM

Makh: My friend got kicked out of his program for teaching a lab class about Rosalind Franklin and her role in DNA crystallography.  He diverted from the lesson plan.


Cool story, bro.
 
2014-07-09 09:51:30 PM

Makh: My friend got kicked out of his program for teaching a lab class about Rosalind Franklin and her role in DNA crystallography.  He diverted from the lesson plan.


Pfft. Everyone knows that girls can't science.
 
2014-07-09 09:51:44 PM
What about Josef Mengele?  He was a humble family doctor who did some breathtaking work into the field of genetics.  Boy, I tell you, you murder a few million humans and the world never forgets.
 
2014-07-09 09:53:18 PM

Makh: My friend got kicked out of his program for teaching a lab class about Rosalind Franklin and her role in DNA crystallography.  He diverted from the lesson plan.



Ha!  Before I even clicked on the link, Rosalind Franklin's name popped into my head.
 
2014-07-09 09:53:46 PM

fusillade762: CruJones: Didn't everyone have to learn about George Washington Carver in school?

Yeah, he's hardly overlooked. Same with Hoffman. In some circles at least.


Albert Hofmann (1906-2008): Swiss scientist who invented and tested the psychedelic drug LSD

Does an accidental discovery count as an invention?




It sure does. That's how Röntgen won the first Nobel Prize in Physics for discovering x-rays.
 
2014-07-09 09:54:09 PM

Prey4reign: What about Josef Mengele?  He was a humble family doctor who did some breathtaking work into the field of genetics.  Boy, I tell you, you murder a few million humans and the world never forgets.


To be fair, Mengele himself probably only murdered a few thousand.
 
2014-07-09 09:54:28 PM
So basically anyone who wasn't a project leader or didn't work alone. That was to be expected. I know an engineer who designed many of Motorola's phones between 1997 and 2001, all of which were patented by the company itself without his name attached; as is typical in that kind of R&D environment.
 
2014-07-09 09:54:32 PM

revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.


There's no clear distinction between the two.
 
2014-07-09 09:55:39 PM

Prey4reign: What about Josef Mengele?  He was a humble family doctor who did some breathtaking work into the field of genetics.  Boy, I tell you, you murder a few million humans and the world never forgets.


You see that church over there? I built it with my bare hands but do they call me O'Reilly the church builder? Nooo! 
You see that school over there? I taught there for 30 years but do they call me O'Reilly the educator? Nooo! 
But you fark one goat....
 
2014-07-09 09:56:29 PM

CruJones: Didn't everyone have to learn about George Washington Carver in school?


He discovered Peanut Butter.
 
2014-07-09 09:56:56 PM

Prey4reign: What about Josef Mengele?  He was a humble family doctor who did some breathtaking work into the field of genetics.  Boy, I tell you, you murder a few million humans and the world never forgets.


The fun part? We used a lot of his quackery during the Cold War. We also took every single German engineer, scientist and technology guy we could get our grubby mitts on. Time was, you could shout "HEIL Hitler!" in NASA and get an entire room on its feet.
 
2014-07-09 09:57:32 PM

Prey4reign: What about Josef Mengele?  He was a humble family doctor who did some breathtaking work into the field of genetics.  Boy, I tell you, you murder a few million humans and the world never forgets.


He should had used_________?
 
2014-07-09 09:58:43 PM

BalugaJoe: CruJones: Didn't everyone have to learn about George Washington Carver in school?

He discovered Peanut Butter.


Negitive; he discovered 110 uses for peanuts. Not a single one was peanut butter.
 
2014-07-09 09:58:43 PM

Bumblefark: Pfft. Everyone knows that girls can't science.


Oblig:

imgs.xkcd.com
 
2014-07-09 10:00:11 PM
This seemed less like a news article and more like a "Fight the Patriarchy" platitude...
 
2014-07-09 10:01:09 PM
Fritz Zwicky from Caltech actually came up with dark matter in 1933 so it's kind of amusing in an article on overlooked scientists he'd get overlooked given that Vera Rubin was all of 5 years old at the time.
 
2014-07-09 10:01:59 PM

iheartscotch: BalugaJoe: CruJones: Didn't everyone have to learn about George Washington Carver in school?

He discovered Peanut Butter.

Negitive; he discovered 110 uses for peanuts. Not a single one was peanut butter.


Dr. John Harvey Kellogg was the first to patent a process to turn raw peanuts into peanut butter.
 
2014-07-09 10:02:05 PM

iheartscotch: BalugaJoe: CruJones: Didn't everyone have to learn about George Washington Carver in school?

He discovered Peanut Butter.

Negitive; he discovered 110 uses for peanuts. Not a single one was peanut butter.


He did discover buck futter though.
 
2014-07-09 10:02:24 PM

Prey4reign: What about Josef Mengele?  He was a humble family doctor who did some breathtaking work into the field of genetics.  Boy, I tell you, you murder a few million humans and the world never forgets.


Same vein: Fritz Haber. Not exactly an obscure figure in his time, but not one who did well in the legacy department after the fact.

/might have something to do with that whole, "father of chemical warfare" thing.
//also fed a whooole lot of people
 
2014-07-09 10:05:41 PM
(Don't say Rosalind Franklin)
(Don't say Rosalind Franklin)

*clicks link*

Oh for fark's sake.

PS She has a school named after her. Would that we all would wind up so "overlooked."
 
2014-07-09 10:06:14 PM

iheartscotch: Prey4reign: What about Josef Mengele?  He was a humble family doctor who did some breathtaking work into the field of genetics.  Boy, I tell you, you murder a few million humans and the world never forgets.

The fun part? We used a lot of his quackery during the Cold War. We also took every single German engineer, scientist and technology guy we could get our grubby mitts on. Time was, you could shout "HEIL Hitler!" in NASA and get an entire room on its feet.


We actually still use a lot of Mengele's data today, as well as some that was collected in similar experiments on American POWs conducted by the Japanese.  The data from both sets of experiments is still highly classified, but the results produced data that we absolutely can never get on our own with our set of laws and ethics.
 
2014-07-09 10:08:20 PM

jshine: revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.

There's no clear distinction between the two.


There is a large overlap but they are distinct. Scientists try to find the fundamental principles that make stuff work. Engineers use those principles to make stuff work.
 
2014-07-09 10:09:04 PM

radarlove: with our set of laws and ethics.


shiat like the Tuskegee Experiments, etc notwithstanding.
 
2014-07-09 10:10:05 PM
TedCruz'sCrazyDad:

Dr. John Harvey Kellogg was the first to patent a process to turn raw peanuts into peanut butter.

He also breakfast cerealed us.

If he came back to life and saw Froot Loops and Coco Puffs he would nuke the whole world.
 
2014-07-09 10:11:54 PM
cdn.hark.com
I learned about George Washington Carver from Shabazz K. Morton and the "Black History Minute"

//Damn you Edward "Skippy" Williamson and Frederick "Jif" Armstrong
 
2014-07-09 10:12:23 PM

Hollie Maea: TedCruz'sCrazyDad:

Dr. John Harvey Kellogg was the first to patent a process to turn raw peanuts into peanut butter.

He also breakfast cerealed us.

If he came back to life and saw Froot Loops and Coco Puffs he would nuke the whole world.


Actually his brother is the one who invented Corn Flakes.  Dr. John tried to fark him out of it in court and lost.
 
2014-07-09 10:16:17 PM
Ironically, the first honorable mention, Jocelyn Bell Burnell ,is given credit for something Tesla did!

Tesla discovered Pulsars.  Of course, he thought they were alien signals.  Burnell discovered what they actually are.
 
2014-07-09 10:16:55 PM

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: iheartscotch: BalugaJoe: CruJones: Didn't everyone have to learn about George Washington Carver in school?

He discovered Peanut Butter.

Negitive; he discovered 110 uses for peanuts. Not a single one was peanut butter.

Dr. John Harvey Kellogg was the first to patent a process to turn raw peanuts into peanut butter.


He invented the blender? It's not a real complicated process
 
2014-07-09 10:17:36 PM

revrendjim: jshine: revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.

There's no clear distinction between the two.

There is a large overlap but they are distinct. Scientists try to find the fundamental principles that make stuff work. Engineers use those principles to make stuff work.


So what's applied science?

Because its not engineering.
 
2014-07-09 10:18:09 PM

revrendjim: jshine: revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.

There's no clear distinction between the two.

There is a large overlap but they are distinct. Scientists try to find the fundamental principles that make stuff work. Engineers use those principles to make stuff work.


The best distinction I have ever heard is: "Engineers ask 'how', Scientists ask 'why'.".  In terms of training and mindset, it is a fundamental difference that gets beaten in early and often.
 
2014-07-09 10:18:32 PM

OscarTamerz: Fritz Zwicky from Caltech actually came up with dark matter in 1933 so it's kind of amusing in an article on overlooked scientists he'd get overlooked given that Vera Rubin was all of 5 years old at the time.


He also came up with the idea of a spherical bastard.... A bastard no matter how you looked at him.
 
2014-07-09 10:21:14 PM
Barbara McClintock: mobile genetic elements (for which she was awarded the Noble Prize), role of centromeres and telomeres, crossing over.

img.fark.net
 
2014-07-09 10:22:27 PM

This text is now purple: revrendjim: jshine: revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.

There's no clear distinction between the two.

There is a large overlap but they are distinct. Scientists try to find the fundamental principles that make stuff work. Engineers use those principles to make stuff work.

So what's applied science?

Because its not engineering.


That's a grey area. My dad was a physics PhD who supervised engineers. He lived in that grey area.
 
2014-07-09 10:28:12 PM

FloridaWombat: revrendjim: jshine: revrendjim: Point of order: Tesla was an engineer, not a scientist.

There's no clear distinction between the two.

There is a large overlap but they are distinct. Scientists try to find the fundamental principles that make stuff work. Engineers use those principles to make stuff work.

The best distinction I have ever heard is: "Engineers ask 'how', Scientists ask 'why'.".  In terms of training and mindset, it is a fundamental difference that gets beaten in early and often.


If you ask a physicist where a formula came from you will get a history of the experimental evidence and a mathematical derivation. If you ask an engineer where a formula came from the answer will be "from the manual."
 
2014-07-09 10:31:44 PM
Ouu, I like that Erdos guy. Sounds like someone I can relate to...
 
2014-07-09 10:36:46 PM
I've heard the scientist/engineer difference explained this way (I'm going to using chemical engineering for the example).  It's a scientist's job to discover/create the new chemical, it's the engineer's job to figure out how to make thousands of gallons of it.
 
2014-07-09 10:37:16 PM

Chach: She has a school named after her. Would that we all would wind up so "overlooked."


Yeah, but no chain of Bagel restaurants. That's the real mark of distinction.

Btw, I live in the Chicago area and know a lot of health/medical people and I have never heard of that place.  Plus it only got her name 10 years ago apparently.  Yeah, I knew who Franklin was long ago, but I was using x-rays.  Most people have never heard of her, or Meitner either, and she has an element.  My point is they and many of the others named could use more recognition.

revrendjim: That's a grey area. My dad was a physics PhD who supervised engineers. He lived in that grey area.


I work with both extensively.  Generally speaking scientists are better at the 'vision thing' and the real fundamentals.  Engineers are better at making stuff work properly and reliably and calling bullshiat on the scientists who are ignoring the fundamentals to 'dream big'.  Pure terms of either type suck.  Most projects go much better with both involved.
 
2014-07-09 10:39:30 PM

Chach: (Don't say Rosalind Franklin)
(Don't say Rosalind Franklin)

*clicks link*

Oh for fark's sake.

PS She has a school named after her. Would that we all would wind up so "overlooked."


She's one of the Great Scientists in Civ4. I'm not aware of any higher honor.
 
2014-07-09 10:48:04 PM
fark Science!! To the track!

My biotechnology degree and my impending M.D. mean nothing! STEM=shiat.

The *Real* power in this country is in Potato Salad.
 
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