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(The New York Times)   Douchebags who take photos of their food for social media are pushing chefs to put more effort into visual appearance than taste   ( nytimes.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, drinking straws, Grant Achatz, food stylists, DSLR, Rene Redzepi, digital revolution, trouts, parmigiana  
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1078 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jul 2014 at 5:11 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-09 01:31:56 PM  
www.jordandbrown.com

Yeah, um.
 
2014-07-09 01:32:47 PM  
Hey... you eat with your eyes first... and let me tell you, as much hot sauce as I put on things, that stings the fark out of them.
 
2014-07-09 01:55:32 PM  
While I can see the validity of the whole "You eat with your eyes first" thing, I have to say I find the casual
beauty of pastoral cuisines like Italian far more visually appealing than most of the artsy presentations
beloved by foodies.
 
2014-07-09 02:15:56 PM  
I put "taking photos of the food you're about to eat" up there with car modding and autoerotic asphyxiation as activities for which I completely fail to comprehend the appeal.
 
2014-07-09 02:22:11 PM  

Pocket Ninja: I put "taking photos of the food you're about to eat" up there with car modding and autoerotic asphyxiation as activities for which I completely fail to comprehend the appeal.


Well, when you consider they are strong indicators of a narcissistic personality, it helps.
 
2014-07-09 02:22:55 PM  
tctechcrunch2011.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-07-09 03:08:33 PM  

Because People in power are Stupid: [www.jordandbrown.com image 850x296]

Yeah, um.


That's actually nothing to do with "preservatives" except the well known preservatives "salt" and "not having much water in it" which comes about as a result of the surface area/volume ratios inherent in thin beef patties and long skinny fries.

...just in case you're one of those types.
 
2014-07-09 03:29:44 PM  
Waiting to see how hubiestubert weighs in on this before I form an opinion...
 
2014-07-09 04:39:03 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: While I can see the validity of the whole "You eat with your eyes first" thing, I have to say I find the casual
beauty of pastoral cuisines like Italian far more visually appealing than most of the artsy presentations
beloved by foodies.


And those heavy potato-laden mid-western casseroles might be ugly, but good lord, are they good.
 
2014-07-09 05:04:17 PM  
Presentation IS something we think about. Impact when folks get a dish first comes from the eyes, then you engage the nose, then you get the tactile from getting that first bite--as well as aural when they hear the sizzle of fajitas in the pan, the crunch as you take that first bite. You want to engage as many senses as possible to make a meal memorable. You want a dish to have impact when folks first get it though. Cameras? If folks are grabbing for a camera before tasting, then I've done a sh*tty job, because I want folks to want to dig in.

Folks are paying more attention to presentation. From the plates or planks or whatever you're serving on. At Glenndale Arena, we did a chaferless serving line for our buffet. Pics are in my profile. We did amuse bouche on the back line, little somethings that didn't really cost us a lot, we took some care to make them look inviting, to get folks to come back again and again. We did our vegetables in small batches so that while we had to refill that serving line often, it was always with pans that looked and smelled amazing, so that folks saw the care that we took to make their time at the game more than just kraut dogs and pizza. It looked amazing, because our job was to make folks who were visiting want to get season tickets to our club level. We were selling not just the buffet, but the whole experience. Down to the action station down on the other side that did 8oz all beef kosher franks, with chili and we carved chili-lime crusted prime rib for our cheese steak sandwiches while folks were there, and we made the cheese sauce right there on the station. It was supposed to fill the air with the scent of the cooking. Folks got a piping hot, freshly carved cheese steak, and a dog with gairdiniera that we pickeled in house. It was a serving line, but the idea was to make impact on folks. That has to come out in more than just the taste. It has to be seen, it has to be felt. You want to do your damn best for folks, and putting a bit of effort into the presentation, that illustrates that you're not just slapping food onto a plate.

You can go overboard. And some folks do. I don't like to put anything on a plate that doesn't contribute to the flavor. Be that a flavored oil, be that a sprinkle of parsley, be that berries or greens, it all has to tie back into the dish itself. You want height, but not just for the sake of building a tower of food, but so that when you dig in, you get all the flavors and all the textures. Sweet of the fish, tang of the sauce, a bit of crunch from the greens, and the flavor of those greens to mix all in. Your starch, if you are using one, has to complement the dish. It's holistic. Everything contributes. A lot of folks just want to do as crazy a presentation as possible, and that goes for the molecular gastronomy folks, and while I appreciate what they're trying to do, it's not really what interests me. I like the tradition. I like the history. I like to take dishes to different places, yes, but I want the base to be traditional. Be that plum tomatoes with an arugula pesto and a Parmesan crouton that is just barely cooled, to black beans and rice. You want balance, not just in flavor, but with color, with textures. You have to look at the dish as a whole. Simple is often better. Pea pancakes are easy to do, they're sweet and delicious, and you top with with a little salad with edamame and spring onions with a bit of honey and apple cider vinegar, and you've got a side dish that stands up all on its own. They look amazing, all green and soft and seared so that they get some color, and they taste even better. You have to look at the dish as a whole, not just looks.

If folks are paying attention to presentation, you also hope that they're doing so because they care not just for the bottom line, but care about your experience. We LIKE to make food that impresses you. From appetizers all the way to dessert. We want you to be wowed, not just by the way it looks, but by the effort we put in to make food that WE want to eat too. The best indicator that a place is doing that, is if you know that the staff is eating there. I did a stint at Johnny's Tavern in Amherst not too long ago, and the fun thing about the place, is that at brunch, we feed the whole staff, and we don't make anything for them that we don't put out on the floor.  The best chefs, are the folks who are eating at their own joint, and not stuff that they make special just for themselves, but the dishes that they do every day. Because those dishes are that awesome. I started my day at the Deerfield Inn with a cup of chowder. Simple enough, and it gave me a chance to make sure that the chowder was up to snuff, but it was also that damn good, that I could start my day with the most basic of starters, and it was a great way to go in and check my inventory, see what we had available for specials, and run down my events sheet. It went out, it was a simple bowl or cup, with barely any garnish--maybe a sprinkle of fresh parsley for color and to give it touch of that freshness that parley imparts--and it was damn near perfect all by its lonesome. You wow folks with something that  simple and elegant, and then you pull out the stops for entrees and dessert. You have to build on the experience. You can hammer folks with too damn much frou frou. My rule, nothing goes in or on a plate that doesn't build on the dish. Be that a tuile for a bowl for your chocolate mousse that is simple and delicious all by its lonesome, and inside of that unassuming little bowl of cookie is a mousse that mouth wateringly rich and delicious, and with bits of crushed hazlenut brittle so that you get not just the crunch of the cookie, but the bits of hard candy sweetness and nuttiness from the hazles, and it all goes into make a bowl of cookie into something extraordinary, to a slather of sauce that goes around the plate that you expect the diner to drag their bite through as they cut into it, to make that bite, and the next all the better.
 
2014-07-09 05:12:48 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: While I can see the validity of the whole "You eat with your eyes first" thing, I have to say I find the casual
beauty of pastoral cuisines like Italian far more visually appealing than most of the artsy presentations
beloved by foodies.


Good Italian is a feast for the eyes. It's one of my favorite cuisines, because it is so very rich in history, and its peasant cuisine aspect makes it both hardy and fun to play with. In the summer months, I tend towards simple antipasto plates, because it's too damn hot to cook too much at home. Give me some good bread, some decent cheese, some slabs of meat, a bit of salad, some olive oil, some cold veggies, and I'm in heaven. Finish it with some fruit and maybe a bit of sweet, syrupy ice, and you've got satisfaction. Italian is often misunderstood as being "heavy" when it is one of those cuisines that has so much variation from region to region, from season to season, that it's hard to go wrong with Italian. From the simplicity of the grill, to quick sautes, to cold salads, to the more intricate pasta dishes, and yes, the heavy duty sauces that come from winter and looking out into a storm season on the coast. It covers seafood, it covers beef, pork, lamb and more. You have an emphasis on vegetables and breads, and quick meals to sit down affairs that take hours, with wine and drink and more food and more sharing of stories. It's one of the great world cuisines, and it's great, because there's just so damn much variety within the "confines" of the region.
 
2014-07-09 05:17:00 PM  
The bottom line is that 90 percent of the people taking pictures are just bragging about the fact that they're at trendy or expensive restaurant.

And half of those people end up making themselves look like rubes.
 
2014-07-09 05:24:38 PM  
Some of the prettiest food Ive had cost 200$ for 7, 1 ounce portions/courses over 3 hours called a "dining experience" by  high profile fancy pants chefs.

Some of the tastiest food I had cost 8$ at greasy spoons and out of the way shacks.

I don't take pictures of my food until after its digested.
 
2014-07-09 05:28:38 PM  
Generalizations:

People living below the poverty line are concerned about the amount of food they have.
Middle Class people are concerned about the Quality of the food.
Wealthy people are concerned about the presentation.
 
2014-07-09 05:31:20 PM  
I enjoy the visual appeal of a well played meal. so I'll take a pic. but if the taste isn't there, I'll not be posting your free advertising.
 
2014-07-09 05:31:21 PM  

zamboni: Hey... you eat with your eyes first... and let me tell you, as much hot sauce as I put on things, that stings the fark out of them.


It'd probably help if you stopped putting your eyes in the hot sauce
 
2014-07-09 05:32:20 PM  
plated*
 
2014-07-09 05:45:54 PM  

Devo: Generalizations:

People living below the poverty line are concerned about the amount of food they have.
Middle Class people are concerned about the Quality of the food.
Wealthy people are concerned about the presentation.


I know a few wealthy people and a few people who take pictures of their food. The circles on that Venn diagram don't meet. It's the middle to upper middle class people who are most concerned with status that take pictures of their food. Wealthy people don't care, lower class people can't afford to.
 
2014-07-09 05:52:06 PM  

odinsposse: Devo: Generalizations:

People living below the poverty line are concerned about the amount of food they have.
Middle Class people are concerned about the Quality of the food.
Wealthy people are concerned about the presentation.

I know a few wealthy people and a few people who take pictures of their food. The circles on that Venn diagram don't meet. It's the middle to upper middle class people who are most concerned with status that take pictures of their food. Wealthy people don't care, lower class people can't afford to.


http://www.salon.com/2010/03/16/hipsters_food_stamps_pinched/

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:http://www.fark .c om/comments/5115557/Hipsters-buying-organic-salmon-imported-cheeses-pe rrier-with-food-stamps-Its-more-likely-than-you-think
 
2014-07-09 05:57:48 PM  

Giltric: Some of the prettiest food Ive had cost 200$ for 7, 1 ounce portions/courses over 3 hours called a "dining experience" by  high profile fancy pants chefs.

Some of the tastiest food I had cost 8$ at greasy spoons and out of the way shacks.

I don't take pictures of my food until after its digested.


img.fark.net
 
2014-07-09 06:05:41 PM  
I was trying to figure out why everyone was all butthurt about someone taking a picture of food they made.  My wife does it whenever she creates something new (for her).

Then I realized that it was about douches taking pictures of their restaurant food, and now the thread makes sense.

/carry on
 
2014-07-09 06:05:43 PM  

hubiestubert: The best chefs, are the folks who are eating at their own joint, and not stuff that they make special just for themselves, but the dishes that they do every day


My google-fu is weak today, who was it who advised chefs to pay attention to how they serve themselves, in order to stay interested in how they serve others?


Giltric: http://www.salon.com/2010/03/16/hipsters_food_stamps_pinched/


All these decades after the Reagan era gave us the "welfare queen" meme, and we still haven't given up on that tired talking point?  You're one of those, aren't you?  You'll make a million suffer to keep a dozen from getting something they "don't deserve".  The poor, after all, must suffer every day, right? How else will you encourage them to choose not to be poor tomorrow?
 
2014-07-09 06:15:57 PM  

fang06554: I was trying to figure out why everyone was all butthurt about someone taking a picture of food they made.  My wife does it whenever she creates something new (for her).

Then I realized that it was about douches taking pictures of their restaurant food, and now the thread makes sense.


If you want to remember a dish/meal, by far the best way is to photograph it

And sometimes, that will be in a restaurant

I would feel dumb doing that, but that's bc I'm old and that isn't the habit of my generation

The article is basically saying that another social more is changing, and chefs are adapting to that

Some chefs get upset about it; most realize that resistance is futile
 
2014-07-09 06:18:17 PM  

hubiestubert: Presentation IS something we think about. Impact when folks get a dish first comes from the eyes, then you engage the nose, then you get the tactile from getting that first bite--as well as aural when they hear the sizzle of fajitas in the pan, the crunch as you take that first bite. You want to engage as many senses as possible to make a meal memorable. You want a dish to have impact when folks first get it though. Cameras? If folks are grabbing for a camera before tasting, then I've done a sh*tty job, because I want folks to want to dig in.

Folks are paying more attention to presentation. From the plates or planks or whatever you're serving on. At Glenndale Arena, we did a chaferless serving line for our buffet. Pics are in my profile. We did amuse bouche on the back line, little somethings that didn't really cost us a lot, we took some care to make them look inviting, to get folks to come back again and again. We did our vegetables in small batches so that while we had to refill that serving line often, it was always with pans that looked and smelled amazing, so that folks saw the care that we took to make their time at the game more than just kraut dogs and pizza. It looked amazing, because our job was to make folks who were visiting want to get season tickets to our club level. We were selling not just the buffet, but the whole experience. Down to the action station down on the other side that did 8oz all beef kosher franks, with chili and we carved chili-lime crusted prime rib for our cheese steak sandwiches while folks were there, and we made the cheese sauce right there on the station. It was supposed to fill the air with the scent of the cooking. Folks got a piping hot, freshly carved cheese steak, and a dog with gairdiniera that we pickeled in house. It was a serving line, but the idea was to make impact on folks. That has to come out in more than just the taste. It has to be seen, it has to be felt. You want to do your damn best for folks, and putting a bit of effort into the presentation, that illustrates that you're not just slapping food onto a plate.

You can go overboard. And some folks do. I don't like to put anything on a plate that doesn't contribute to the flavor. Be that a flavored oil, be that a sprinkle of parsley, be that berries or greens, it all has to tie back into the dish itself. You want height, but not just for the sake of building a tower of food, but so that when you dig in, you get all the flavors and all the textures. Sweet of the fish, tang of the sauce, a bit of crunch from the greens, and the flavor of those greens to mix all in. Your starch, if you are using one, has to complement the dish. It's holistic. Everything contributes. A lot of folks just want to do as crazy a presentation as possible, and that goes for the molecular gastronomy folks, and while I appreciate what they're trying to do, it's not really what interests me. I like the tradition. I like the history. I like to take dishes to different places, yes, but I want the base to be traditional. Be that plum tomatoes with an arugula pesto and a Parmesan crouton that is just barely cooled, to black beans and rice. You want balance, not just in flavor, but with color, with textures. You have to look at the dish as a whole. Simple is often better. Pea pancakes are easy to do, they're sweet and delicious, and you top with with a little salad with edamame and spring onions with a bit of honey and apple cider vinegar, and you've got a side dish that stands up all on its own. They look amazing, all green and soft and seared so that they get some color, and they taste even better. You have to look at the dish as a whole, not just looks.

If folks are paying attention to presentation, you also hope that they're doing so because they care not just for the bottom line, but care about your experience. We LIKE to make food that impresses you. From appetizers all the way to dessert. We want you to be wowed, not just by the way it looks, but by the effort we put in to make food that WE want to eat too. The best indicator that a place is doing that, is if you know that the staff is eating there. I did a stint at Johnny's Tavern in Amherst not too long ago, and the fun thing about the place, is that at brunch, we feed the whole staff, and we don't make anything for them that we don't put out on the floor.  The best chefs, are the folks who are eating at their own joint, and not stuff that they make special just for themselves, but the dishes that they do every day. Because those dishes are that awesome. I started my day at the Deerfield Inn with a cup of chowder. Simple enough, and it gave me a chance to make sure that the chowder was up to snuff, but it was also that damn good, that I could start my day with the most basic of starters, and it was a great way to go in and check my inventory, see what we had available for specials, and run down my events sheet. It went out, it was a simple bowl or cup, with barely any garnish--maybe a sprinkle of fresh parsley for color and to give it touch of that freshness that parley imparts--and it was damn near perfect all by its lonesome. You wow folks with something that  simple and elegant, and then you pull out the stops for entrees and dessert. You have to build on the experience. You can hammer folks with too damn much frou frou. My rule, nothing goes in or on a plate that doesn't build on the dish. Be that a tuile for a bowl for your chocolate mousse that is simple and delicious all by its lonesome, and inside of that unassuming little bowl of cookie is a mousse that mouth wateringly rich and delicious, and with bits of crushed hazlenut brittle so that you get not just the crunch of the cookie, but the bits of hard candy sweetness and nuttiness from the hazles, and it all goes into make a bowl of cookie into something extraordinary, to a slather of sauce that goes around the plate that you expect the diner to drag their bite through as they cut into it, to make that bite, and the next all the better.


I am wondering, do you honestly expect people to read all of that?
 
2014-07-09 06:19:24 PM  
praxcelis:

Giltric: http://www.salon.com/2010/03/16/hipsters_food_stamps_pinched/

All these decades after the Reagan era gave us the "welfare queen" meme, and we still haven't given up on that tired talking point?  You're one of those, aren't you?  You'll make a million suffer to keep a dozen from getting something they "don't deserve".  The poor, after all, must suffer every day, right? How else will you encourage them to choose not to be poor tomorrow?


I tend to think of it as a theft of resources that could be better used by people who really need it.

Instead of everyone digging deeper to offset that theft of resources and looking the other way in regards to the people who are stealing those resources what do you propose?

Besides...its not an op ed piece. The article is interviewing the hipster on food stamps.

If you cant believe their own testimony, what will you believe?

inb4 poor people have a right to use ebts at a strip club....
 
2014-07-09 06:21:09 PM  
Empty H: I am wondering, do you honestly expect people to read all of that?

The right folks, will. Others won't. I'm not really going to worry about it.
 
2014-07-09 06:24:18 PM  

hubiestubert: You wow folks with something that simple and elegant, and then you pull out the stops for entrees and dessert.


I have to say - the thing that really does it for me is a well-cooked steak, plain.  No fancy stuff, just that lovely brown crust, still hot, rested properly...  it sounds simple, but even "great steakhouses" I've visited don't always get it just right.  And when they do, it's magnificent.  From the brown crispy crust to the tenderness and color of the meat, the flavor, the aroma...  Wow.  Just... wow.

Fark dessert, if the steak is exemplary.
 
2014-07-09 06:26:30 PM  

Empty H: hubiestubert: <waxes poetic>  I am wondering, do you honestly expect people to read all of that?


I did.  Hubie talks food.  Coherently.  If you don't like food talk, don't read it.
 
2014-07-09 06:30:03 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: hubiestubert: You wow folks with something that simple and elegant, and then you pull out the stops for entrees and dessert.

I have to say - the thing that really does it for me is a well-cooked steak, plain.  No fancy stuff, just that lovely brown crust, still hot, rested properly...  it sounds simple, but even "great steakhouses" I've visited don't always get it just right.  And when they do, it's magnificent.  From the brown crispy crust to the tenderness and color of the meat, the flavor, the aroma...  Wow.  Just... wow.

Fark dessert, if the steak is exemplary.



I prefer pan seared and finished in an oven low and slow to broiling or grilling, especially at home.

Have another steak for desert.
 
2014-07-09 06:37:39 PM  
People eat with their eyes, silly. If your food looks like something that the chef fished out of the toilet, would you want to eat it?

/and those people taking photos of your food and putting them up on social media?
//yeah, they're free advertisements for your establishment
 
2014-07-09 06:38:30 PM  
That said, if you've already taken bites from your food before realizing that you forgot to take a photo of it first, just let it go man. Nobody wants to see that.
 
2014-07-09 06:46:29 PM  

Giltric: Some of the prettiest food Ive had cost 200$ for 7, 1 ounce portions/courses over 3 hours called a "dining experience" by  high profile fancy pants chefs.

Some of the tastiest food I had cost 8$ at greasy spoons and out of the way shacks.

I don't take pictures of my food until after its digested.


www.ratemypoo.com
 
2014-07-09 06:50:33 PM  

hubiestubert: DjangoStonereaver: While I can see the validity of the whole "You eat with your eyes first" thing, I have to say I find the casual
beauty of pastoral cuisines like Italian far more visually appealing than most of the artsy presentations
beloved by foodies.

Good Italian is a feast for the eyes. It's one of my favorite cuisines, because it is so very rich in history, and its peasant cuisine aspect makes it both hardy and fun to play with. In the summer months, I tend towards simple antipasto plates, because it's too damn hot to cook too much at home. Give me some good bread, some decent cheese, some slabs of meat, a bit of salad, some olive oil, some cold veggies, and I'm in heaven. Finish it with some fruit and maybe a bit of sweet, syrupy ice, and you've got satisfaction. Italian is often misunderstood as being "heavy" when it is one of those cuisines that has so much variation from region to region, from season to season, that it's hard to go wrong with Italian. From the simplicity of the grill, to quick sautes, to cold salads, to the more intricate pasta dishes, and yes, the heavy duty sauces that come from winter and looking out into a storm season on the coast. It covers seafood, it covers beef, pork, lamb and more. You have an emphasis on vegetables and breads, and quick meals to sit down affairs that take hours, with wine and drink and more food and more sharing of stories. It's one of the great world cuisines, and it's great, because there's just so damn much variety within the "confines" of the region.


I think in the Italian vs French visual presentation of food, its the old "Girl Next Door" vs The Supermodel.

Both can be gorgeous in completely different ways.
 
2014-07-09 06:52:47 PM  
I only take pictures of the weird foreign sodas I get so I can remember what they are next time I'm at the weird foreign grocery.
 
2014-07-09 06:53:47 PM  

Empty H: hubiestubert: Presentation IS something we think about. Impact when folks get a dish first comes from the eyes, then you engage the nose, then you get the tactile from getting that first bite--as well as aural when they hear the sizzle of fajitas in the pan, the crunch as you take that first bite. You want to engage as many senses as possible to make a meal memorable. You want a dish to have impact when folks first get it though. Cameras? If folks are grabbing for a camera before tasting, then I've done a sh*tty job, because I want folks to want to dig in.

Folks are paying more attention to presentation. From the plates or planks or whatever you're serving on. At Glenndale Arena, we did a chaferless serving line for our buffet. Pics are in my profile. We did amuse bouche on the back line, little somethings that didn't really cost us a lot, we took some care to make them look inviting, to get folks to come back again and again. We did our vegetables in small batches so that while we had to refill that serving line often, it was always with pans that looked and smelled amazing, so that folks saw the care that we took to make their time at the game more than just kraut dogs and pizza. It looked amazing, because our job was to make folks who were visiting want to get season tickets to our club level. We were selling not just the buffet, but the whole experience. Down to the action station down on the other side that did 8oz all beef kosher franks, with chili and we carved chili-lime crusted prime rib for our cheese steak sandwiches while folks were there, and we made the cheese sauce right there on the station. It was supposed to fill the air with the scent of the cooking. Folks got a piping hot, freshly carved cheese steak, and a dog with gairdiniera that we pickeled in house. It was a serving line, but the idea was to make impact on folks. That has to come out in more than just the taste. It has to be seen, it has to be felt. You want to do your damn best for folks, ...


It was well worth reading
 
2014-07-09 06:57:20 PM  

hubiestubert: Empty H: I am wondering, do you honestly expect people to read all of that?

The right folks, will. Others won't. I'm not really going to worry about it.


Yay, I'm "right folks".

/Today, at least.
 
2014-07-09 07:02:04 PM  

Giltric: Instead of everyone digging deeper to offset that theft of resources and looking the other way in regards to the people who are stealing those resources what do you propose?


Fallacy of the Perfect.  It doesn't work perfectly, so it must be scrapped.  Yes, I think better oversight and means testing will help (heck, let's audit Medicare pharmacy and procurement while we're at it--institutional waste is MUCH higher than at the individual level)

Besides...its not an op ed piece. The article is interviewing the hipster on food stamps.
If you cant believe their own testimony, what will you believe?


Anecdote != data.  I wouldn't be so quick to increase suffering in the world just because a few will game the system.  There is better return in being willing to improve the system than there is in scrapping it entirely.  It's not perfect, no system designed and implemented by humans is, but there are levels of imperfection I'm willing to accept in return for the vast majority of help going where it is truly needed.
 
2014-07-09 07:06:25 PM  

Empty H: I am wondering, do you honestly expect people to read all of that?


It's often interesting to get a professional's opinion.
It was this time.
 
2014-07-09 07:13:05 PM  

praxcelis: Giltric: Instead of everyone digging deeper to offset that theft of resources and looking the other way in regards to the people who are stealing those resources what do you propose?

Fallacy of the Perfect.  It doesn't work perfectly, so it must be scrapped.  Yes, I think better oversight and means testing will help (heck, let's audit Medicare pharmacy and procurement while we're at it--institutional waste is MUCH higher than at the individual level)

Besides...its not an op ed piece. The article is interviewing the hipster on food stamps.
If you cant believe their own testimony, what will you believe?

Anecdote != data.  I wouldn't be so quick to increase suffering in the world just because a few will game the system.  There is better return in being willing to improve the system than there is in scrapping it entirely.  It's not perfect, no system designed and implemented by humans is, but there are levels of imperfection I'm willing to accept in return for the vast majority of help going where it is truly needed.


Your fallacy of the perfect is a strawman.

If you are going to pretend i said things and try to argue against fiction im just going to not read anything past the word scrapped.

Try getting laid, it displaces the anger you have towards caricatures of people who live in your head.
 
2014-07-09 07:15:44 PM  

thornhill: The bottom line is that 90 percent of the people taking pictures are just bragging about the fact that they're at trendy or expensive restaurant.

And half of those people end up making themselves look like rubes.


The other 10% are Fazoli's employees taking pictures of their lunch from the kitchen during their lunch break.
 
2014-07-09 07:20:16 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: hubiestubert: DjangoStonereaver: While I can see the validity of the whole "You eat with your eyes first" thing, I have to say I find the casual
beauty of pastoral cuisines like Italian far more visually appealing than most of the artsy presentations
beloved by foodies.

Good Italian is a feast for the eyes. It's one of my favorite cuisines, because it is so very rich in history, and its peasant cuisine aspect makes it both hardy and fun to play with. In the summer months, I tend towards simple antipasto plates, because it's too damn hot to cook too much at home. Give me some good bread, some decent cheese, some slabs of meat, a bit of salad, some olive oil, some cold veggies, and I'm in heaven. Finish it with some fruit and maybe a bit of sweet, syrupy ice, and you've got satisfaction. Italian is often misunderstood as being "heavy" when it is one of those cuisines that has so much variation from region to region, from season to season, that it's hard to go wrong with Italian. From the simplicity of the grill, to quick sautes, to cold salads, to the more intricate pasta dishes, and yes, the heavy duty sauces that come from winter and looking out into a storm season on the coast. It covers seafood, it covers beef, pork, lamb and more. You have an emphasis on vegetables and breads, and quick meals to sit down affairs that take hours, with wine and drink and more food and more sharing of stories. It's one of the great world cuisines, and it's great, because there's just so damn much variety within the "confines" of the region.

I think in the Italian vs French visual presentation of food, its the old "Girl Next Door" vs The Supermodel.

Both can be gorgeous in completely different ways.


The thing is, a lot of French cooking is likewise peasant cuisine, often given a makeover in higher end places, but at the core, still a hearty peasant cuisine, with a simplicity. Escoffier is the father of modern cooking, and his brigade system is widely the most common for organizing kitchens, but that shows how much the French thought of and thought about cooking. While Escoffier elevated haute cuisine, much of it is still based upon the simplicity of regional dishes first in the hands of those peasants. Execution and refining of those dishes, that is part of the process. You make your base from those who came before, and while you may take elements and then scrutinize and see what you can improve, you keep the heart of the dish by staying true to its origins. One of the my most treasured compliments while I was at the Iron Horse, was for a Steak and Tattie Pie that I did for a Celtic show, and while I was out talking to one of our regulars, his mother put her hand on my shoulder, and told me how much she enjoyed it, and with a rich Irish brogue, she looked down, and said that it reminded her of her mother's, "though it wasn't as foine as your's..." And I blushed down to my toes. That's what keeping to the history and the tradition of a dish really means. You channel that history, that tradition, and you make it your own, but you have to know those roots, know the dish to understand how to polish it further. That old woman made my month with as simple a thing as steak and potato pie, and to know that I reminded her of her mother's kitchen, after all those years, that's something I treasure. Which is why I say, again and again, what chefs make isn't necessarily food. That is the vehicle for our art and craft, but in the end, what we really make are memories. Of times with folks. The food? That doesn't last. At the end of the night, the pots are washed, the plates are cleaned, and if we've done our jobs right, we aren't left with anything else. The memories? Those are our shot at immortality of a kind, because people take the memory of the meal, and of the people they were with, and the times, and the moments shared. That's what we create. The food is just how we do so. For all the culinary students, they tend to focus on the dishes, they focus on the tools, the craft, but you have to realize that all the fancy and whimsy and the frou frou is just the vehicle for helping people have a memorable time. Help people make great memories. Help them have a great time, and feed them up right, and the rest takes care of itself.
 
2014-07-09 07:25:34 PM  

thornhill: The bottom line is that 90 percent of the people taking pictures are just bragging about the fact that they're at trendy or expensive restaurant.

And half of those people end up making themselves look like rubes.


I have to agree with that.  Someone who I am very close to takes pictures of EVERY food place we visit (unless it is a chain fast food joint).  And takes a pic of everything we eat from multiple angles.  Their excuse?  "I have a bad memory so I want to have a record that I enjoyed this particular place."

My thought? "Nope, you are just going to show off to your friends that you ate at this 5 star Yelp rated trendy place to brag...even though the food is really average."

Seriously, nothing helps kill the mood better than having a conversation with someone before chow and they stop everything to take a picture of the food, and interrupt everything.
 
wee
2014-07-09 07:28:54 PM  

Giltric: I prefer pan seared and finished in an oven low and slow to broiling or grilling, especially at home.


I built a sous vide machine and have been doing them that way.  6 hours in the 132F water then into a cast iron skillet that is the hottest I can get it for 45 seconds per side.  Let it rest for a minute while you cook something else (mushrooms and butter with some Madeira are good) in the pan for a side real fast.

You come away with zero perceptible transition from pink, mid-rare meat to dark brown perfect crust.  It's absolutely perfect and 100% foolproof (I know this because I can do it).

I'll never grill a steak again.  And I sure as shiat won't take a picture of it.
 
2014-07-09 07:31:28 PM  

Because People in power are Stupid: [www.jordandbrown.com image 850x296]

Yeah, um.


This is kind of ironic, given your username

SOmeone did an experiment, I'll have to dig it up-
It's got nothing to do with hidden 'preservatives' in the McDonald's burger, or even necessarily super-high salt content.

It's because burgers that size actually dry up before they can mold: Once they're dessicated, there's no moisture for mold to grow with. They even did a test where they made their own burger the same size as the McDonald's burger: Neither molded.

(Seriously. Their quarter pounder WILL Mold, because it's larger, and *doesn't* dry out fast enough.)

(I can dig it up, if you'd like.)
 
2014-07-09 07:37:07 PM  
To quote/paraphrase Gael Greene,

The dish looks so pretty, you just know someone has had their fingers all over your food.
 
2014-07-09 07:40:55 PM  
More effort in presentation is always welcome. I don't think any of us want to be served with all of the dishes and sides in a pig slop bucket.
 
2014-07-09 07:47:49 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: Waiting to see how hubiestubert weighs in on this before I form an opinion...


I too came to this thread to see him take them to the woodshed.
 
2014-07-09 07:51:16 PM  

Jaden Smith First of His Name: More effort in presentation is always welcome. I don't think any of us want to be served with all of the dishes and sides in a pig slop bucket.


Oh please, a trough is MUCH more efficient.
 
2014-07-09 07:59:31 PM  

Mi-5: thornhill: The bottom line is that 90 percent of the people taking pictures are just bragging about the fact that they're at trendy or expensive restaurant.

And half of those people end up making themselves look like rubes.

I have to agree with that.  Someone who I am very close to takes pictures of EVERY food place we visit (unless it is a chain fast food joint).  And takes a pic of everything we eat from multiple angles.  Their excuse?  "I have a bad memory so I want to have a record that I enjoyed this particular place."

My thought? "Nope, you are just going to show off to your friends that you ate at this 5 star Yelp rated trendy place to brag...even though the food is really average."

Seriously, nothing helps kill the mood better than having a conversation with someone before chow and they stop everything to take a picture of the food, and interrupt everything.


I've told people to just put the camera away. I cannot stand it.
 
2014-07-09 08:00:24 PM  

Jaden Smith First of His Name: More effort in presentation is always welcome. I don't think any of us want to be served with all of the dishes and sides in a pig slop bucket.


Really? Have you ever seen how busy buffets are?
 
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