Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(IT World)   Python takes over from Java as the top college teaching language because, apparently, it's easier to learn with a hangover   (itworld.com ) divider line
    More: Interesting  
•       •       •

942 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jul 2014 at 12:46 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



59 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2014-07-09 10:26:14 AM  
So colleges are teaching scripting instead of programming, now?

Nice to see our colleges keeping up with IT demand..
 
2014-07-09 10:30:18 AM  
What's a pointer?  What happens when the current crop of compiler guys retire and die and no one knows C/C++?!
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-09 10:31:31 AM  
MIT skipped from Scheme to Python without going through a Java phase. Bill Gates gave the CS department a bunch of money in 1999 and everything went downhill from there.
 
2014-07-09 10:34:04 AM  

Brontes: What's a pointer?


upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-07-09 10:34:49 AM  

Brontes: What's a pointer?  What happens when the current crop of compiler guys retire and die and no one knows C/C++?!


C/C++ is still very alive and well in many codebases, especially ones that have been around for that long and are too large to re-write.  we've still got college grads coming in with C/C++ skills, there's not going to be a problem until those languages go the way of fortran.
 
2014-07-09 10:40:19 AM  
My degree path initially called for a semester of Java, and a semester of C++. I hated Java, but managed to slog my way through the semester and get through with a C.

When I went to buy my books for the following semester, there was nothing for C++. Instead, for my course and section, there was a shiny new Java text. Apparently, some of the big-name local employers had told the school that they'd prefer graduates with a greater depth of knowledge of one language, rather than an introductory knowledge of two. This being Texas, Academia responded to Business, and I got to trudge through another semester of Java.
 
2014-07-09 11:07:18 AM  
I for one can't stand Jerba.

and this is why:

cdn-static.zdnet.com

Maybe I am not fooled but every so often one of my users is. Jerba is for lazy developers who don't care if they push malware onto their clients.
 
2014-07-09 11:13:05 AM  

ZAZ: MIT skipped from Scheme to Python without going through a Java phase. Bill Gates gave the CS department a bunch of money in 1999 and everything went downhill from there.


Well, when you destroy building 20 and put a disgusting Gehry abomination on its bones, what happens after that really can't make things worse.  I hope they're haunted by nightmares to go with their leaks.
 
2014-07-09 12:12:59 PM  
Is it slow and buggy?  If not, then it cannot replace Java.
 
2014-07-09 12:53:20 PM  
Why would non programmers need to program?  My company hired a guy straight out of college with some CS degree or something to fill a .NET / C# programming position to support our ecommerce platform.  At the end of his first day he asked me if I could point to any good C# references since they didn't teach language in school.

There's quite a bit wrong with what I just wrote but thinking about it makes me stabby.
 
2014-07-09 01:06:59 PM  

nitefallz: At the end of his first day he asked me if I could point to any good C# references since they didn't teach language in school.


C# isn't taught at any school, as far as I know. Certainly not as a core language.

Do you mean that he hadn't done ANY programming?
 
2014-07-09 01:09:19 PM  

doublesecretprobation: Brontes: What's a pointer?  What happens when the current crop of compiler guys retire and die and no one knows C/C++?!

C/C++ is still very alive and well in many codebases, especially ones that have been around for that long and are too large to re-write.  we've still got college grads coming in with C/C++ skills, there's not going to be a problem until those languages go the way of fortran.


C/C++ (or something like them) will always be around as long as we need to do low-level systems work. Sometimes, what you really, really need is a pointer swap.

It's also important to acknowledge that. All languages have their uses, and there are definitely good and bad use cases for each. Ask me how I know.
 
2014-07-09 01:18:43 PM  

Fubini: nitefallz: At the end of his first day he asked me if I could point to any good C# references since they didn't teach language in school.

C# isn't taught at any school, as far as I know. Certainly not as a core language.

Do you mean that he hadn't done ANY programming?


It's not taught at colleges, probably, but there are certainly many places he could have learned.  Basically, he applied for a job for which he had no experience, real world or academic, and was hired.

He mentioned knew some javascript but that was about it.  He said they only really taught concepts in the classes he was taking.  He left after 1 year experience and got hired else where for much more money.
 
2014-07-09 01:24:30 PM  
nitefallz:   He left after 1 year experience and got hired else where for much more money.

This is how you get ahead in business.  Don't work anywhere longer than 18 months.  If you do then you will at some point actually be stuck supporting code that you actually wrote and be discovered as the dumbass you really are.  Jumping from company to company increases your bank account, as well as giving you the advantage of always being "the new guy" and never getting stuck with the crappy work the old timers have to do.
 
2014-07-09 01:31:25 PM  

Brontes: What's a pointer?  What happens when the current crop of compiler guys retire and die and no one knows C/C++?!


In all fairness, java uses pointers all the time when objects are passed into/returned from anything. Can't do pointer arithmetic to my knowledge, but that's not always a bad thing.
 
2014-07-09 01:34:24 PM  

nitefallz: Why would non programmers need to program?  My company hired a guy straight out of college with some CS degree or something to fill a .NET / C# programming position to support our ecommerce platform.  At the end of his first day he asked me if I could point to any good C# references since they didn't teach language in school.

There's quite a bit wrong with what I just wrote but thinking about it makes me stabby.


This is not snark or snootiness.  The two most important things aptitude and interest.  Sound obnoxious but I see way to many people that get into programming because "I heard it pays well" or some such nonsense.  Do you like tinkering and reasoning through complex problems?  Do you seek proof and more details?  Can you worry about some detail that others gloss over but you are convinced it will do very bad things if left un-addressed.  Then you might to just fine.

So start with this:  http://www.visualstudio.com/en-us/products/visual-studio-express-vs.a s px 
Work through these:  http://channel9.msdn.com/Series/C-Sharp-Fundamentals-Development-for- A bsolute-Beginners
and join one of these:  https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie= U TF-8#q=dot%20net%20user%20group

But if you don't love any of those things I mentioned above please consider something else.

//To a certain extent languages are just syntax, the fundamentals are the same.
//Unless it is a VxRx/System-32 derived system.  Then languages can be unique forms of torture.
//All my proficient languages have their origins in C.
 
2014-07-09 01:36:40 PM  

Brontes: What's a pointer?  What happens when the current crop of compiler guys retire and die and no one knows C/C++?!


There aren't more than a few dozen people in the whole world who know C++ now. The rest of the folks who only know the tiny subsets of the language used in their particular projects will continue to get along just fine with cut-n-paste and other forms of cargo-cult programming.
 
2014-07-09 01:38:27 PM  

Brontes: What happens when the current crop of compiler guys retire and die and no one knows C/C++?!


lh5.googleusercontent.com

j/k, C/C++ are still my "native" languages
 
2014-07-09 01:40:37 PM  

Lucky LaRue: So colleges are teaching scripting instead of programming, now?

Nice to see our colleges keeping up with IT demand..


Depends on what you're trying to teach. Introduction to logic, loops, conditionals, variables, constants, lists, arrays? Why not teach that in Python? It's not the specific tool that's important esp at the beginning its the concept. Nothing prevents you from pealing the onion instead of building the onion.
 
wee
2014-07-09 01:41:49 PM  

Lucky LaRue: So colleges are teaching scripting instead of programming, now?


I initially thought it was a solid 7 out of 10, but you apparently got no bites at all, just a dog picture...  What's this world coming to?
 
2014-07-09 01:49:41 PM  

maxximillian: Lucky LaRue: So colleges are teaching scripting instead of programming, now?

Nice to see our colleges keeping up with IT demand..

Depends on what you're trying to teach. Introduction to logic, loops, conditionals, variables, constants, lists, arrays? Why not teach that in Python? It's not the specific tool that's important esp at the beginning its the concept. Nothing prevents you from pealing the onion instead of building the onion.


My only issue is that most colleges refuse to use any form of Studio like it is a holy war or something.  C based if fine, but they need to let the Windows development environment enter their worldview.  Not letting their students have the option to get familiar with on of the largest development arenas is doing them a disservice.
 
2014-07-09 01:52:16 PM  

nitefallz: It's not taught at colleges, probably, but there are certainly many places he could have learned.  Basically, he applied for a job for which he had no experience, real world or academic, and was hired.


Oh, good point.

Though I will say, a good CS person should be able to hit the ground running with a new language in a day or two, especially once they have *real* experience in their first language.

I know of companies here in the midwest who have internal training programs, where they'll literally take anyone with a college degree- accountants, HR, admin. assistants, etc. and throw them through a week long crash course in programming, with the option to graduate to a three-month course and a programming position.

They just can't find people with *any* programming experience, much less experience that's specific to their process. Of course, the cynical side of me sees that they can take an HR person or secretary, give a 10% pay raise and just enough knowledge that they can do a technically skilled job, but not enough that they could jump ship to another company, and end up with a low-paid programmer for life.
 
2014-07-09 01:59:24 PM  

fst_creeper: My only issue is that most colleges refuse to use any form of Studio like it is a holy war or something.  C based if fine, but they need to let the Windows development environment enter their worldview.  Not letting their students have the option to get familiar with on of the largest development arenas is doing them a disservice.


All of the colleges I'm familiar with have used Visual Studio for C/C++ work. Alternatives are always presented as options, though.

It comes and goes with technologies though. Visual Studio does a good job of staying on top of developments like the C++ 11 standard (we taught a course here last year using C++11, which was interesting because GCC had one subset of the standard implemented, VS had another subset, Clang had another subset, etc.).

On the flip side, Visual Studio does a very bad (good?) job of keeping people platform independent, and obfuscating concepts behind Microsoft APIs and types. You can usually tell what compiler any fresh college grad used, because the VS people don't really get the whole preprocessor->compiler->linker toolchain.
 
2014-07-09 02:22:16 PM  

I_Am_Weasel: Is it slow and buggy?  If not, then it cannot replace Java.


Java isn't that slow these days. Besides, lwjgl supports OpenCL. DAQ is my main complaint about java, but JNI works fine if your college didn't teach you
Python
 
2014-07-09 02:23:34 PM  

Fubini: All of the colleges I'm familiar with have used Visual Studio for C/C++ work. Alternatives are always presented as options, though.


I would love to see that.  None of the new grads I see have touched it.  Of late they typically are used to doing Java or Python in Eclipse.  You can hear the gears grind as they try to change mental gears.  They spend weeks fighting the IDE and not actually coding.

Fubini: On the flip side, Visual Studio does a very bad (good?) job of keeping people platform independent, and obfuscating concepts behind Microsoft APIs and types.


Oh absolutely, but I personally think that sometimes the emphasis on platform independence is way over-hyped.  Mostly because this ends up meaning Java which I've come to hate with the heat of a thousand suns. (Perfect marriage made in hell for me is the paring of Java and Oracle in a JVM on a windows server)  And ever sense 2010 they have made Studio way more flexible.  I dabble in Arduino and Android for fun and can now do both via Studio

If I had my way they'd start with the fundamentals in school in C on a 'nix and then have the choice of going for higher level on either VS C# or Java or something similar.  And a couple of weeks of real or simulated assembly would be a nice treat.
 
2014-07-09 02:38:30 PM  
I learned on PASCAL.  Damn, I'm feeling old now.
 
2014-07-09 02:43:11 PM  

The Larch: Brontes: What's a pointer?  What happens when the current crop of compiler guys retire and die and no one knows C/C++?!

There aren't more than a few dozen people in the whole world who know C++ now. The rest of the folks who only know the tiny subsets of the language used in their particular projects will continue to get along just fine with cut-n-paste and other forms of cargo-cult programming.


Good one.
++theLarch
 
2014-07-09 02:59:10 PM  
I was subjected to using Ada when learning OO concepts for my degree. Though I appreciate it a bit more now, I was so glad when we got to higher level classes and started using mostly C and C++.

/Never cared much for Python but maybe that's because I learned scripting with Perl
 
2014-07-09 03:08:34 PM  
Are all the professors named "Bruce"?  If not, I hope they don't mind if we call them "Bruce" just to keep it clear.
 
2014-07-09 03:13:24 PM  
Students just learning programming need a REPL: they need fast feedback, trial and error, and not having to decipher scary compiler messages.  I shouldn't have to figure out how to write main() and a static Program class and run it under debug in order to piece together code when I'm just learning.

Students learning programming need a multi-paradigm language that can support functional, OO, and imperative-style programming, so that all those techniques can be taught.

Students learning programming need a language that is "close" to the major languages in existence and in the workplace (C#, Java, and C++).

Students learning programming need a multi-platform, free (as in beer), and easy to install (it shouldn't take hours to setup an environment).

Student learning programming need a garbage-collector to start with.

The only thing that fits all of these criteria, that I know of, is Python.
 
2014-07-09 03:19:09 PM  

Clever Neologism: Students just learning programming need a REPL: they need fast feedback, trial and error, and not having to decipher scary compiler messages.  I shouldn't have to figure out how to write main() and a static Program class and run it under debug in order to piece together code when I'm just learning.

Students learning programming need a multi-paradigm language that can support functional, OO, and imperative-style programming, so that all those techniques can be taught.

Students learning programming need a language that is "close" to the major languages in existence and in the workplace (C#, Java, and C++).

Students learning programming need a multi-platform, free (as in beer), and easy to install (it shouldn't take hours to setup an environment).

Student learning programming need a garbage-collector to start with.

The only thing that fits all of these criteria, that I know of, is Python.


Ruby does all that, and handles some of it a little better, I think, and also has had good lambda handling, right from the start.

I agree Python is a good choice for 'first language', but I'm just sayin' -- Ruby would be good, too.
 
2014-07-09 03:25:55 PM  
No it isn't.
 
2014-07-09 03:41:00 PM  

Clever Neologism: Students just learning programming need a REPL: they need fast feedback, trial and error, and not having to decipher scary compiler messages.  I shouldn't have to figure out how to write main() and a static Program class and run it under debug in order to piece together code when I'm just learning.

Students learning programming need a multi-paradigm language that can support functional, OO, and imperative-style programming, so that all those techniques can be taught.

Students learning programming need a language that is "close" to the major languages in existence and in the workplace (C#, Java, and C++).

Students learning programming need a multi-platform, free (as in beer), and easy to install (it shouldn't take hours to setup an environment).

Student learning programming need a garbage-collector to start with.

The only thing that fits all of these criteria, that I know of, is Python.


I totally disagree.  Cutting your teeth on all that stuff is painful but key to understanding current projects.  I'd rather see professors spend some time on that in an intro class.  Maybe have the kids configure a make file from an open source project since that can be so crucial to future projects.

Garbage collection should be earned after one has learned what happens when forgetting to free() a malloc().

Granted, I did EE at UT from 200 to 2004 and am biased having spent a lot of time in the trenches with C/C++, Qt, VS and lots of open source programs and recently switching to Java in the last few months.
 
2014-07-09 03:57:22 PM  

Fubini: nitefallz: It's not taught at colleges, probably, but there are certainly many places he could have learned.  Basically, he applied for a job for which he had no experience, real world or academic, and was hired.

Oh, good point.

Though I will say, a good CS person should be able to hit the ground running with a new language in a day or two, especially once they have *real* experience in their first language.

I know of companies here in the midwest who have internal training programs, where they'll literally take anyone with a college degree- accountants, HR, admin. assistants, etc. and throw them through a week long crash course in programming, with the option to graduate to a three-month course and a programming position.

They just can't find people with *any* programming experience, much less experience that's specific to their process. Of course, the cynical side of me sees that they can take an HR person or secretary, give a 10% pay raise and just enough knowledge that they can do a technically skilled job, but not enough that they could jump ship to another company, and end up with a low-paid programmer for life.


I was hired out of college to program in a language I had never seen. It was 1990, and the language was Ada. I coded in Ada for several years on two different projects before I moved to something where I got to do C (which I had learned in college) and makefiles (which are their own special form of torture).

The guy upthread who said that aptitude and interest are key has a good point. I have literally lost count of the number of languages and tools that I've had to learn on the fly because I needed them for work. It's just about the only way I learn new stuff any more, because God knows I don't have any free time to learn new languages just for the hell of it. And doing something 40+ hours a week for a couple of months will get you up to speed pretty quickly.
 
2014-07-09 04:05:39 PM  
Computer Science really has very little to do with software development/engineering/programming.  I've worked with some really amazing C.S. professors who do amazing research and have a billion papers published but aren't very good at writing software at all.

Most CS programs are preparing students to be future CS Professors - they don't consider themselves a 'trade school' and their goal isn't to produce 9-5 office workers.

Python is very popular in the research community.  That's why Professors are teaching it.  It doesn't have anything to do with learning curves, it has to do with what they prefer.
 
2014-07-09 04:10:18 PM  
Hell - just read some of the quotes:
'The move to Python gained us, among other things, the freedom not to have to explain Java's generics and access modifiers. We used to spend too much time on syntax and other details... '

Yes - because things like generics and access modifiers are too hard for college students studying computer science?  I don't know, that really doesn't seem like a good argument at all to me.  Beyond that, they should still be explaining the difference between dynamic/static languages and the concept of generics (and why they don't apply in Python).  They should certainly be covering access modifiers since Python has them, and because encapsulation is an important OO concept.

I don't buy it.
 
2014-07-09 04:14:26 PM  

NeoCortex42: I learned on PASCAL.  Damn, I'm feeling old now.


Yeah, I still keep all of those big ass Borland Turbo PASCAL boxes, diskettes, and books on my top shelf just to remind me of my youth.
 
2014-07-09 04:16:02 PM  

dr.zaeus: NeoCortex42: I learned on PASCAL.  Damn, I'm feeling old now.

Yeah, I still keep all of those big ass Borland Turbo PASCAL boxes, diskettes, and books on my top shelf just to remind me of my youth.


Turbo Pascal 3.0 is what I started on in college. That was before they even had the integrated debugger. When that debugger came out, I thought I'd died and gone to heaven.
 
2014-07-09 04:28:27 PM  
You know, Python makes good comments in C/C++ code.  Write the prototype in Python, comment the whole program out and insert the C code.  It takes a lot more lines...  But at least you have the "executable pseudocode" to look back at for reference.

Of course you could write the real, human-digestible comments first, then the prototype in Python, then swap the code out as needed in C.

Some people think it'd be faster to just write the uncommented C code.  But having to mentally parse everything you've written to read the code as you write it, worry about structure, function and syntax all at the same time, plus all of the memory management, etc. takes a lot more brainpower.

So I usually write the comments first, then fill in code that does what the comments describe.  Lay out the structure, figure out the functionality, then write small bits of example code as you go...

Python works well with the Literate Programming approach because it has a shell and you can test each piece of code as you go, never having to worry about recompiling or reloading test data, etc. because it's still there in the shell.  Seems easier to get the techniques right that way.

I'm starting my kids on Python programming now, and the youngest one is 10.  I wouldn't consider for a moment trying to teach a 10 year old Java as their first language, not someone I like anyway.
 
2014-07-09 04:35:20 PM  
after reading most of the comments here i'm feeling old (started programming in FORTRAN IV on an IBM 1140, then moved to a 360/44. 1970 was a long time ago)
then for 25 years taught beginning programming to high school students using BASIC, Pascal, C++, and Java.

along the way I dabbled in Lisp, ADA, Snobol, COBOL, and probably some others I've blocked out

The intro language doesn't matter, when you hit the real world, as has been mentioned, you are going to be learning something new, either a new language or a different implementation of one you already know.

one of my students graduated college and got thrown in a project interfacing a COBOL program with the company's internal web. so he had to learn enough COBOL to work with it.

so .....

Python  big deal, might be useful, probably not.  the important thing is do the students learn to program ?
cause once you've learned in one language transfering to another is work but not impossible.
 
2014-07-09 04:48:21 PM  

nitefallz: Why would non programmers need to program?  My company hired a guy straight out of college with some CS degree or something to fill a .NET / C# programming position to support our ecommerce platform.  At the end of his first day he asked me if I could point to any good C# references since they didn't teach language in school.

There's quite a bit wrong with what I just wrote but thinking about it makes me stabby.


Tell me about it.  I do the hiring.  Turns out a lot of guys with 5 years C# experience can't actually write a CS101 level program.  Apparently that's why they were looking for a job.  Most recent grads I've interviewed knew at least some Java.  The guy most likely to get hired is the one who can show he's written a program outside of class.  My last hire didn't know C#, but still completed the programming test in 13 minutes, most of which was spent teaching himself Visual Studio and C#.

While it's important that schools teach theory, it's equally important that they teach the practical side of things.  And a class on writing secure programs would be a godsend.
 
2014-07-09 05:11:13 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Hell - just read some of the quotes:
'The move to Python gained us, among other things, the freedom not to have to explain Java's generics and access modifiers. We used to spend too much time on syntax and other details... '

Yes - because things like generics and access modifiers are too hard for college students studying computer science?  I don't know, that really doesn't seem like a good argument at all to me.  Beyond that, they should still be explaining the difference between dynamic/static languages and the concept of generics (and why they don't apply in Python).  They should certainly be covering access modifiers since Python has them, and because encapsulation is an important OO concept.

I don't buy it.


I'd argue that it's a distraction.  When someone is just starting to learn how to program, it's best to be able to focus on one thing at a time and not be distracted by a whole bunch of stuff that the student won't understand until several lessons further in.  Python works well in this case because, for example, the "Hello world" program is just one line of code (print "Hello world"), compared to at least 5 lines of C++ or Java (you need a main function, in C++ you need to include iostream or something equivalent, and in Java your main function needs to be a class method).

In addition, Python is also used heavily in the industry (most of Google's infrastructure is written in Python), so it's a nice skill to have when you graduate.  And even if you don't use it professionally, being able to write a script does come in handy every so often.
 
2014-07-09 05:13:11 PM  
Hangover?  Python only works if you are properly spaced out.
 
2014-07-09 05:37:56 PM  
Python is a lot easier than Java for newbie "programmers" to grasp, but I had to put "programmers" in quotes because it's a scripting language, not a programming language.

Python is also much more likely to be something students have encountered before, and will encounter again as a number of very playable, well known video games can digest it for mods and the like.  This also makes it more useful and practical, as the students can maybe see their work in a game or something.

It means they don't have to teach them to make a whole environment, and can start with simple scripts.  I mean, just to do a Hello World in Java, you have to have a large amount of unexplained (at that time) code at the top of the file.  it has to compile right, and needs the code to open an output window..  Do a scripting language like PHP or Python, and the results don't need any extra overhead to be seen.

If they want a way to teach actual programming languages, start with either Visual Basic or nothing (using spoken or written statements in lieu of actual code.  Called Pseudo-code in some places by some douchebags).  Let those who can grasp it with a pretty UI and automagic corrections move on to the better stuff while weeding out those that either can't think in terms of logic statements and programming syntax.

It won't happen any time soon, at least until Intro to Software Development is a High-school requirement.
 
2014-07-09 06:07:37 PM  

NeoCortex42: I learned on PASCAL.  Damn, I'm feeling old now.


Same here...my Bachelor's in CS from early 90's was mainly COBOL, Pascal, Fortran and LISP.  Had some C/C++ near the end.
 
2014-07-09 06:13:45 PM  
Python is cool
Django is cool

php can suck eggs
 
2014-07-09 06:19:10 PM  

IronJelly: Python is a lot easier than Java for newbie "programmers" to grasp, but I had to put "programmers" in quotes because it's a scripting language, not a programming language.


That's a ridiculous distinction.  Historical purpose aside, it's no less a programming language than Java.
 
2014-07-09 06:39:58 PM  

Brontes: Garbage collection should be earned after one has learned what happens when forgetting to free() a malloc().


Not really. free() and malloc() are themselves very simplified high-level abstractions on top of the much more complex operating system memory management services, which are in turn abstractions on the hardware. The level of abstraction involved in automatic garbage collection is just one tiny part of the complexities of memory management. In my opinion, free() and malloc() do little or nothing illuminate the darker, true complexities of memory management.
 
2014-07-09 07:51:43 PM  

The Larch: Brontes: Garbage collection should be earned after one has learned what happens when forgetting to free() a malloc().

Not really. free() and malloc() are themselves very simplified high-level abstractions on top of the much more complex operating system memory management services, which are in turn abstractions on the hardware. The level of abstraction involved in automatic garbage collection is just one tiny part of the complexities of memory management. In my opinion, free() and malloc() do little or nothing illuminate the darker, true complexities of memory management.


Also, comma, memory management, and like such as.
 
2014-07-09 08:29:25 PM  

The Larch: The Larch: Brontes: Garbage collection should be earned after one has learned what happens when forgetting to free() a malloc().

Not really. free() and malloc() are themselves very simplified high-level abstractions on top of the much more complex operating system memory management services, which are in turn abstractions on the hardware. The level of abstraction involved in automatic garbage collection is just one tiny part of the complexities of memory management. In my opinion, free() and malloc() do little or nothing illuminate the darker, true complexities of memory management.

Also, comma, memory management, and like such as.


you guys just need to go back to using sbrk (2)
 
Displayed 50 of 59 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report