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(USA Today) Video LeBron counts the German goals against Brazil as their fans cry. Not one, not two, not three   (ftw.usatoday.com) divider line 26
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2761 clicks; posted to Video » on 09 Jul 2014 at 9:54 AM (2 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



26 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-09 01:47:54 AM
It could be worst.  The last goal could have been called back.
 
2014-07-09 07:18:26 AM
I'm surprised LeBron got past 3.
 
2014-07-09 10:11:09 AM
fark LeBron
 
2014-07-09 10:24:50 AM
DAMN, that's cold! XD
 
2014-07-09 10:28:06 AM

Crewmannumber6: fark LeBron


This cannot be said too much

FARK LEBRON
 
2014-07-09 11:18:14 AM

ManateeGag: I'm surprised LeBron got past 3.


You would think that he would try to distance himself from anything even closely related to the decision.
 
2014-07-09 11:29:21 AM

mjbok: ManateeGag: I'm surprised LeBron got past 3.

You would think that he would try to distance himself from anything even closely related to the decision.


He's good at basketball and, well , mostly he's good at basketball. Nobody ever accused him of being the sharpest tool in the shed.
 
2014-07-09 11:41:49 AM

mikaloyd: mjbok: ManateeGag: I'm surprised LeBron got past 3.

You would think that he would try to distance himself from anything even closely related to the decision.

He's good at basketball and, well , mostly he's good at basketball. Nobody ever accused him of being the sharpest tool in the shed.


Do you actually think he cut this himself?
 
2014-07-09 11:43:43 AM

mikaloyd: He's good at basketball and, well , mostly he's good at basketball. Nobody ever accused him of being the sharpest tool in the shed.


I remember reading an article about him after he had been in the league for a few years.  He still wasn't the man, but was well on his way.  I remember distinctly thinking that this was a guy who seemed to have his head on straight.  Now, I don't think so.  I don't mind the decision (though it was stupid, careless, and frankly mean), but I mind the way he handles himself on the court.  He (and other stars) play with a different set of rules.  He can hand check, he can hack, he can push off, but if you so much as breathe on him and a foul isn't called he acts like the world is about to end.  I know this isn't unique to him, but between this and Lebronning, he is not as good as he could be.
 
2014-07-09 11:55:42 AM

IAmRight: mikaloyd: mjbok: ManateeGag: I'm surprised LeBron got past 3.

You would think that he would try to distance himself from anything even closely related to the decision.

He's good at basketball and, well , mostly he's good at basketball. Nobody ever accused him of being the sharpest tool in the shed.

Do you actually think he cut this himself?


well...i hope no one thinks that.
 
2014-07-09 12:23:18 PM

mjbok: I know this isn't unique to him, but between this and Lebronning, he is not as good as he could be.


Again, maybe if the league allowed guys to fight it out like they used to - if LeBron were allowed to punch guys in the face and have THEM get ejected for nearly hurting his fist in retaliation for the crap pulled against him - then there wouldn't be so much flopping/exaggerating.

Instead you have joke teams like the Bulls fouling at half-court on every fast break instead of actually trying any transition defense because hey, why give up points if there's less of a penalty for tackling the guy at half-court? You have Ibaka breaking James' nose and there be no call.

The more you look at the complaining about calls LeBron gets, the more you see that it's people with zero understanding of how basketball is played. MY GOD HE PUT HIS SHOULDER FORWARD WHEN EXECUTING A SPIN MOVE! Yeah, that's physically how you have to do it when you're moving forward.

/and let's all remember that he didn't do this nearly as much before crossing paths with Dwyane Wade, the slimiest flopper this side of Harden
//Wade is also by far the dirtiest player on the team
///90% of the LeBron hate should have been focused on Wade all along
 
2014-07-09 01:28:01 PM

IAmRight: Again, maybe if the league allowed guys to fight it out like they used to - if LeBron were allowed to punch guys in the face and have THEM get ejected for nearly hurting his fist in retaliation for the crap pulled against him - then there wouldn't be so much flopping/exaggerating.


I don't think this can be said enough. Players like Bird and Jordan did despicable things but are remembered with glowing reputations. In this day and age (post-Malice at the Palace), they'd have very negative reputations as "dirty" players if they did the same things. What really kills me, though, is that people talk  longingly of that era of basketball in one breath and then castigate players like Bowen and Artest in the next (but not superstars like Shaq, so it's not just referees that get blinded by star power). No true Scotsman, I guess?
 
2014-07-09 01:51:12 PM

IAmRight: Instead you have joke teams like the Bulls fouling at half-court on every fast break instead of actually trying any transition defense because hey, why give up points if there's less of a penalty for tackling the guy at half-court?


Man, fark you and your tired anti-Chicago schtick. Every team in the league fouls the other team at half court. It's stupid, but that's a problem with the rules of the game. Anyway, doesn't your city's NBA team do the same thing?

I'll give you a minute to go watch some Seattle Storm highlights.
 
2014-07-09 01:51:30 PM

bertor_vidas: castigate players like Bowen


Well he should be castigated because he pulled chickensh*t stuff that should've gotten him laid the f*ck out in an era where no one could lay a finger on him.
 
2014-07-09 01:54:44 PM

skrame: Every team in the league fouls the other team at half court.


Not on EVERY. SINGLE. PLAY.

Again, I have nothing against Chicago. Y'all just currently have an unpleasant style of play that demeans the sport of basketball. And prior to that, you signed an unpleasant person at QB and treated him as though he were a superstar. When Chicago plays enjoyable basketball again and Cutler is gone, then there won't be any anti-Chicago "schtick".

skrame: I'll give you a minute to go watch some Seattle Storm highlights.


You know I live in Portland, right?
 
2014-07-09 02:11:39 PM

IAmRight: bertor_vidas: castigate players like Bowen

Well he should be castigated because he pulled chickensh*t stuff that should've gotten him laid the f*ck out in an era where no one could lay a finger on him.


I'm not arguing that. I'm merely pointing out the horrible inconsistency of people who complain about the NBA.

/Thanks to Big Shot Rob, Bowen only has chickenshiat plays 2 through whatever on the Spurs' greatest hits list.
 
2014-07-09 02:35:10 PM

IAmRight: Again, I have nothing against Chicago. Y'all just currently have an unpleasant style of play that demeans the sport of basketball.


Lulz.
 
2014-07-09 04:01:24 PM

bertor_vidas: Players like Bird and Jordan did despicable things but are remembered with glowing reputations. In this day and age (post-Malice at the Palace), they'd have very negative reputations as "dirty" players if they did the same things. What really kills me, though, is that people talk longingly of that era of basketball in one breath and then castigate players like Bowen and Artest in the next (but not superstars like Shaq, so it's not just referees that get blinded by star power).


Jordan was the start of the massive rules changes favoring star athletes.  However the Ron Artest interactive fan experience was something that should cause him to have more issues than he has.
 
2014-07-09 04:11:25 PM
Is there supposed to be audio? I don't understand these Vine things. Half the time they don't even load.
 
2014-07-09 06:58:06 PM

mjbok: Jordan was the start of the massive rules changes favoring star athletes finesse over brute strength.


Stars have always gotten preferential treatment. What happened in the NBA was that the league decided to open things up and let finesse (or "skill" if you will) be the deciding factor rather than brute strength. That it disproportionately helped superstars is to be expected as they tend to be more skilled. It's somewhat akin to hockey's changes during one of the recent lockouts which got rid of grab and hold defense (or at least attempted to). You see it across most of the professional leagues, in fact--just look at the PI and other coverage changes in the NFL.

However the Ron Artest interactive fan experience was something that should cause him to have more issues than he has.

While I consider his actions deplorable, I feel they were about as justified as any which have led to an NBA fight. You expect elbows in the back and other chippy play, but you generally don't expect objects flying in from the stands (Philadelphia sports arenas excepted). It's a bit disingenuous to say that it's acceptable for you to punch someone who intentionally bumped into you after the play (Jordan vs. Miller) but not for you to punch someone who flung a beer at you (Artest vs. Random Pistons Fan).
 
2014-07-09 07:59:59 PM

bertor_vidas: What happened in the NBA was that the league decided to open things up and let finesse (or "skill" if you will) be the deciding factor rather than brute strength. That it disproportionately helped superstars is to be expected as they tend to be more skilled


I disagree with this completely, especially regarding Lebron.  He is far from a finesse player.  He is skilled and has incredible moves, but much of what he does is through brute force with those moves.  Plus the constant shoving, pushing off, etc is far from finesse.

bertor_vidas: While I consider his actions deplorable, I feel they were about as justified as any which have led to an NBA fight. You expect elbows in the back and other chippy play, but you generally don't expect objects flying in from the stands


Once again I disagree.  Outside of someone coming onto the floor (partially because I would love to see someone deck Spike Lee)  there is no excuse for what happened there.  There are people to handle the people in the stands.  They would have been ejected.  Him going into the stands is in no way, shape or form the same thing as two athletes going at it on the court.
 
2014-07-09 08:03:35 PM
The stands would be a better place if there were a little kernel of thought in the back of people's minds that:

a) "a player may get tired of my sh*t and beat my ass," and
b) "I won't get any money from a lawsuit for it"

Unfortunately, we live in a world where we eliminate most incentive to not be an asshole all the time.
 
2014-07-09 09:01:51 PM

lostcat: Is there supposed to be audio? I don't understand these Vine things. Half the time they don't even load.


Looping video starts out mute (and thank goodness for it.) The unmute control is on the upper left.
 
2014-07-09 10:39:01 PM

mjbok: I disagree with this completely, especially regarding Lebron.  He is far from a finesse player.  He is skilled and has incredible moves, but much of what he does is through brute force with those moves.  Plus the constant shoving, pushing off, etc is far from finesse.


Here's my problem with your assessment: If I describe a player who generates space by pushing off, shoving, and such or a player who bullies smaller/less physically imposing opponents or a player who viciously attacks the rim for dunks and putbacks, I could just as easily be describing Jordan. For pushing and shoving, how about The Shot/"Bulls Win!"? Jordan elbows Ehlo in the face on the previous possession and arm checks him on the last one. Or maybe you prefer the last shot of the 1998 Finals where he pushes Russel on his stop and pop. You should also keep in mind that Jordan played against Reggie Miller, Craig Ehlo, John Starks, and Joe Dumars among others. Most of them were giving up more than a few inches or a few pounds or both on Jordan, a fact he used to his advantage (watch the last play of the 1997 Finals where he manhandles Jeff Hornacek, for instance). As for plays of screaming athleticism, it's hard to top Jordan's putback of Pippen's miss versus the Blazers. Or you could go back to the play where he elbowed Ehlo. Jordan muscled past Ehlo in a manner reminiscent of James (or perhaps it's more apt to say James does it in a manner reminiscent of Jordan).

It's fine and well to reduce a player's prowess to their physical tools. Both Jordan and James are the far right tail of the far right tail ad infinitum, but reducing them to just physical gifts denigrates their softer skills. Ball hawking passing lanes isn't about overpowering opponents. Spotting the open man with a higher percentage shot than you and hitting him isn't about overpowering opponents. Knocking down shots (threes in particular) isn't about overpowering opponents. I understand that simplistic and bowdlerized characterizations are rather appealing. They're certainly easier to condense into a highlight reel. It doesn't make them right.

/I would like to take the time to point out that Jordan was a far inferior 3 point shooter (one "finesse" test)
//Excluding 1994-1997 (short 3), Jordan was sub 30% from deep in his career
///James, by comparison, has only shot below 30% once
 
2014-07-09 11:17:22 PM

bertor_vidas: Here's my problem with your assessment: If I describe a player who generates space by pushing off, shoving, and such or a player who bullies smaller/less physically imposing opponents or a player who viciously attacks the rim for dunks and putbacks, I could just as easily be describing Jordan. For pushing and shoving, how about The Shot/"Bulls Win!"? Jordan elbows Ehlo in the face on the previous possession and arm checks him on the last one. Or maybe you prefer the last shot of the 1998 Finals where he pushes Russel on his stop and pop. You should also keep in mind that Jordan played against Reggie Miller, Craig Ehlo, John Starks, and Joe Dumars among others. Most of them were giving up more than a few inches or a few pounds or both on Jordan, a fact he used to his advantage (watch the last play of the 1997 Finals where he manhandles Jeff Hornacek, for instance). As for plays of screaming athleticism, it's hard to top Jordan's putback of Pippen's miss versus the Blazers. Or you could go back to the play where he elbowed Ehlo. Jordan muscled past Ehlo in a manner reminiscent of James (or perhaps it's more apt to say James does it in a manner reminiscent of Jordan).

It's fine and well to reduce a player's prowess to their physical tools. Both Jordan and James are the far right tail of the far right tail ad infinitum, but reducing them to just physical gifts denigrates their softer skills. Ball hawking passing lanes isn't about overpowering opponents. Spotting the open man with a higher percentage shot than you and hitting him isn't about overpowering opponents. Knocking down shots (threes in particular) isn't about overpowering opponents. I understand that simplistic and bowdlerized characterizations are rather appealing. They're certainly easier to condense into a highlight reel. It doesn't make them right.

/I would like to take the time to point out that Jordan was a far inferior 3 point shooter (one "finesse" test)
//Excluding 1994-1997 (short 3), Jordan wa ...


I agree (especially with your specific instances) about Jordan, but I don't consider 3 point % a finesse thing.  It's all about how you define it.  Jordan was more apt to go around/over people when driving to the hoop.  Lebron is more likely to go through someone.  Also you have to remember that Jordan didn't lift (many) weights in the beginning of his career because he was afraid that additional muscle would screw up his shot.  Lebron is much more physical, probably by stature alone.  2 inches and 30 pounds make a difference.
 
2014-07-10 09:34:49 AM

mjbok: mikaloyd: He's good at basketball and, well , mostly he's good at basketball. Nobody ever accused him of being the sharpest tool in the shed.

I remember reading an article about him after he had been in the league for a few years.  He still wasn't the man, but was well on his way.  I remember distinctly thinking that this was a guy who seemed to have his head on straight.  Now, I don't think so.  I don't mind the decision (though it was stupid, careless, and frankly mean), but I mind the way he handles himself on the court.  He (and other stars) play with a different set of rules.  He can hand check, he can hack, he can push off, but if you so much as breathe on him and a foul isn't called he acts like the world is about to end.  I know this isn't unique to him, but between this and Lebronning, he is not as good as he could be.


It goes back to Jordan.  He wasn't 3/4s the GOAT they make him out to be, but he got easy calls so he wouldn't foul out in the first half.

(PS Bill Russell has a ring for every finger and a toe.)
 
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