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(BBC-US)   Medical students get to perform 3D autopsies on computer-generated corpses, and how cool is that? "Students can handle a virtual cadaver without all the legislation that accompanies the use of a real one" (pics)   (bbc.com) divider line 22
    More: Spiffy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Anatomy students, dissections  
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1059 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Jul 2014 at 1:36 AM (16 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



22 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-07 08:59:50 PM  
That's pretty neat.
 
2014-07-07 09:26:01 PM  
encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2014-07-07 10:08:09 PM  
cdn.akamai.steamstatic.com
 
2014-07-07 11:11:40 PM  
That would certainly inspire confidence in me if I needed surgeory.

www.vintagetoyroom.com
 
2014-07-08 12:43:41 AM  
So when is that coming out for the iPad?

Maybe we'd all like to learn more about anatomy.
 
2014-07-08 01:05:02 AM  
Most people have a box on their drivers licenses for organ donation. I have on for autopsy. I check the box that says "No Autopsy".

I don't want everybody to know who had sex with my dead body. I'm usually an attentive lover. Hopefully you understand if I'm not quite so generous. Unless you find me after I've blown my head off. I'll probably be pretty open-minded.
 
2014-07-08 02:35:35 AM  

jaylectricity: Most people have a box on their drivers licenses for organ donation. I have on for autopsy. I check the box that says "No Autopsy".

I don't want everybody to know who had sex with my dead body. I'm usually an attentive lover. Hopefully you understand if I'm not quite so generous. Unless you find me after I've blown my head off. I'll probably be pretty open-minded.


I was about to say, no body to molest after hours? Well, count me OUT.
 
2014-07-08 02:36:53 AM  

Shrapnel: jaylectricity: Most people have a box on their drivers licenses for organ donation. I have on for autopsy. I check the box that says "No Autopsy".

I don't want everybody to know who had sex with my dead body. I'm usually an attentive lover. Hopefully you understand if I'm not quite so generous. Unless you find me after I've blown my head off. I'll probably be pretty open-minded.

I was about to say, no body to molest after hours? Well, count me OUT.


If you'd like the virtual version of that, it's called Second Life.
 
2014-07-08 03:50:37 AM  
So when they get to their first real cadaver, they pass the fark out.
 
2014-07-08 06:11:54 AM  
 
2014-07-08 07:29:26 AM  
img.squakenet.com


/been reporting to medical school since 1988
 
2014-07-08 07:34:35 AM  
Notably missing: Smell, touch, taste (unfortunate circumstances) that goes with cadavers.
 
2014-07-08 07:46:48 AM  

DeathByGeekSquad: So when they get to their first real cadaver, they pass the fark out.


This.  The idea of virtual things is cool and can help with information, but it will not help with conditioning and adapting to certain aspects of medicine.  The smells, the juices, the textures and consistancies of things even the motions and reactions a dead body can give in real life really cannot be replaced.

I see this as a junior trainer, one step below anatomy and procedure books.  Good for location and that's about it.

Maybe even with the books or a good lecture IF it's accompanied by good descriptions(audio or text).

Of course, it could improve somewhat over the years as technology advances.  In that regard, it would take an advancement in physics engines.  Fluids and slimes and gel-like body organs, say, for example, a liver should behave just like this if it's healthy, like this if condition X, or like this if condition Y....or to remove the liver, you have to snip here and bend and wiggle it out the hole like so fashion..etc
 
2014-07-08 08:21:41 AM  

DeathByGeekSquad: So when they get to their first real cadaver, they pass the fark out.


Do the computer-generated models have all the kinks and quirks that real body has? The misshaped organs, the fat deposits, the stuff that squirms and slides around when you try to get a hold of it? I don't know if a computer model can act and feel like a real dead body. Not to mention the whole idea of dealing with dead bodies, real dead bodies--the mental adjustments you have to deal with.

I can watch people dissect or butcher animals all day long and do nothing more than wrinkle my nose at it. But do it myself? I know from experience--absolutely not. Puke city.
 
2014-07-08 09:04:41 AM  
Oculus Rift would be great for this.
 
2014-07-08 09:07:28 AM  

Ambivalence: So when is that coming out for the iPad?

Maybe we'd all like to learn more about anatomy.


there's trauma center for wii
 
2014-07-08 10:06:34 AM  
www.frogsonice.com
 
2014-07-08 10:20:41 AM  
Is there vivisection DLC?
 
2014-07-08 12:56:38 PM  
I see surgeon simulator is already covered

//leaving happy
//the survival rate of those patients makes the holocaust look inefficient...
 
2014-07-08 01:08:19 PM  

omeganuepsilon: DeathByGeekSquad: So when they get to their first real cadaver, they pass the fark out.

This.  The idea of virtual things is cool and can help with information, but it will not help with conditioning and adapting to certain aspects of medicine.  The smells, the juices, the textures and consistancies of things even the motions and reactions a dead body can give in real life really cannot be replaced.

I see this as a junior trainer, one step below anatomy and procedure books.  Good for location and that's about it.

Maybe even with the books or a good lecture IF it's accompanied by good descriptions(audio or text).


Surgeons have to know their way around the human body like you know how to drive from your home to work, and back again.  You cannot be a good surgeon without mastering anatomy.  Medical students who want to be surgeons would benefit from mucking around with cadavers.

An internist can't get away with ignorance of anatomy either, but a detailed knowledge of how to find your way around all the squishy bits is not necessarily required.

Radiologists also have to know their anatomy well.  A device like this would be perfect for training medical students how to interpret 2-D radiographic images, as you could immediately see how it is derived from imaging a 3-D structure.

Actually, this would be good for any physician who uses imaging modalities of any sort.  You could generate a lung mass in your holographic cadaver, then show what a chest X-ray would look like.  You could generate an intra-cranial mass and render a simulated MRI.  You could create an abdominal aortic aneurysm and render a simulated angiogram and/or ultrasound.  You could fracture the pelvis and show what the plain X-rays and CT scan would look like.  Et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.
 
2014-07-08 05:22:53 PM  
img.fark.net

Approves.
 
2014-07-08 07:18:53 PM  

Parthenogenetic: omeganuepsilon: DeathByGeekSquad: So when they get to their first real cadaver, they pass the fark out.

This.  The idea of virtual things is cool and can help with information, but it will not help with conditioning and adapting to certain aspects of medicine.  The smells, the juices, the textures and consistancies of things even the motions and reactions a dead body can give in real life really cannot be replaced.

I see this as a junior trainer, one step below anatomy and procedure books.  Good for location and that's about it.

Maybe even with the books or a good lecture IF it's accompanied by good descriptions(audio or text).

Surgeons have to know their way around the human body like you know how to drive from your home to work, and back again.  You cannot be a good surgeon without mastering anatomy.  Medical students who want to be surgeons would benefit from mucking around with cadavers.

An internist can't get away with ignorance of anatomy either, but a detailed knowledge of how to find your way around all the squishy bits is not necessarily required.

Radiologists also have to know their anatomy well.  A device like this would be perfect for training medical students how to interpret 2-D radiographic images, as you could immediately see how it is derived from imaging a 3-D structure.

Actually, this would be good for any physician who uses imaging modalities of any sort.  You could generate a lung mass in your holographic cadaver, then show what a chest X-ray would look like.  You could generate an intra-cranial mass and render a simulated MRI.  You could create an abdominal aortic aneurysm and render a simulated angiogram and/or ultrasound.  You could fracture the pelvis and show what the plain X-rays and CT scan would look like.  Et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.


It could be developed into something useful, as I said.  As it stands, it's not that great of a piece of software.  It's just a singular ct scan with removable parts.  Much like those plastic anatomy dolls.

Get back to me when you can edit it on the fly to do as you said, generate conditions like masses, arthritis, wounds, etc etc, replicate any sorts of imaging techniques(ct, ultra sound, mri, xray, etc), to include foreign bodies and cavities.

Now that would be a cool piece of software.  What they have now is more like a static image with removable pieces, from the sound of it.

This is:
www.consoleclassix.com

Compared to our theoretical:
static.gamespot.com
As far as "dissection simulation" can compare to warfare with tanks at any rate.
 
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