If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Aviation Week)   How airliners are prepared for the scrap heap. Like cars, sometimes they're worth more as parts than as a whole   (aviationweek.com) divider line 24
    More: Interesting, Aviation Week, avionics, Marana, International Civil Aviation Organization, airliners  
•       •       •

2320 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Jul 2014 at 3:23 PM (6 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-07-07 02:24:50 PM
It was just a few years ago that many of the older airframes were being scraped due to fuel costs, then there were plenty of surplus new airframes because airlines were going out of business or didn't need them due to the recession and they were being flown directly to the desert for storage.  Newer air frames that were leased would turn up on the Market after just a few years, but now it's for parts?  Are they not making enough replacement parts or are the designs changing just too fast?
 
2014-07-07 03:41:56 PM
I'm looking for a left turn blinker assembly from a 1973 747 SP.
 
2014-07-07 04:08:47 PM
The peculiarities of the jet market. In less developed areas they could use the newer jets that are about to be scraped, but the operators can't compete with the parting companies.

I'm surprised this isn't being done in Spain, where the climate is drier and they have a nice abandoned airport, not just a WW2 bomber base.
 
2014-07-07 04:11:11 PM

RoyBatty: I'm looking for a left turn blinker assembly from a 1973 747 SP.


With or without the Pan Am markings?
 
2014-07-07 04:14:21 PM
Sad thing is the air frame they are talking about is only 10 years old.  It could generate revenue for another 15 years at least, but somehow it's still worth more in parts.
 
2014-07-07 04:14:57 PM

StrikitRich: RoyBatty: I'm looking for a left turn blinker assembly from a 1973 747 SP.

With or without the Pan Am markings?


Wish I could afford the Pan Am markings!
 
2014-07-07 04:18:05 PM

Minarets: Sad thing is the air frame they are talking about is only 10 years old.  It could generate revenue for another 15 years at least, but somehow it's still worth more in parts.


That really surprised me as well - I know not to many years ago secondary markets were still flying passenger 727s and that airframe went out of production in 1984.
 
2014-07-07 05:07:51 PM

Minarets: Sad thing is the air frame they are talking about is only 10 years old.  It could generate revenue for another 15 years at least, but somehow it's still worth more in parts.


I wonder how much of that is driven by the fuel economy of older jets.
 
2014-07-07 05:11:48 PM

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: Minarets: Sad thing is the air frame they are talking about is only 10 years old.  It could generate revenue for another 15 years at least, but somehow it's still worth more in parts.

I wonder how much of that is driven by the fuel economy of older jets.


The fuel economy of a 10 year old 737 isn't going to be drastically different from a new build 737.  Heck in the article, they said they made back their initial investment just by selling the engines alone.
 
2014-07-07 05:13:40 PM

Minarets: The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: Minarets: Sad thing is the air frame they are talking about is only 10 years old.  It could generate revenue for another 15 years at least, but somehow it's still worth more in parts.

I wonder how much of that is driven by the fuel economy of older jets.

The fuel economy of a 10 year old 737 isn't going to be drastically different from a new build 737.  Heck in the article, they said they made back their initial investment just by selling the engines alone.


So what's driving this that makes it cheaper to part out a jet at half it's expected productive life?
 
2014-07-07 05:26:31 PM

Lamberts Ho Man: So what's driving this that makes it cheaper to part out a jet at half it's expected productive life?


Farking $650K winglets, that's what.
 
2014-07-07 05:28:06 PM
It blows my mind how expensive airplane parts are. The winglets are $650K used. That's ridiculous. I'm sure they are easily worth the cost but that is a lot of money for a part that doesn't even move.
 
2014-07-07 05:28:29 PM
The name plate on my desk is made from a 707 engine blade so I'm getting a kick.

My husband salvaged it from the scrap heap, cut it down, buffed it, and engraved my name on it. I have the coolest name plate in the office.
 
2014-07-07 05:33:24 PM
Theres an easy way to do it

pics.imcdb.org
 
2014-07-07 05:39:45 PM

Lamberts Ho Man: So what's driving this that makes it cheaper to part out a jet at half it's expected productive life?


New replacement parts are generally sold at a premium in most industries.

My dad had a coworker that used to buy cars coming off their one-year lease contracts for scrap.  He'd break the vehicle down, box up the parts and send them off to a couple of auto shops that regularly bought from him.  Anything left went to the recyclers.

As to if those auto shops were marketing those parts as new or used is a different matter.
 
2014-07-07 05:41:30 PM

Ed Grubermann: Lamberts Ho Man: So what's driving this that makes it cheaper to part out a jet at half it's expected productive life?

Farking $650K winglets, that's what.


Right - so I'm still wrapping my head around the economics of it.  Why can those used winglets command $650K?  Why doesn't some manufacturer undercut that by say, $600K?

My guess is that somehow Boeing has strangled the market and prevented unapproved 3rd parties from producing parts for their aircraft without a licence/contract/etc.  Said license costing approximately $600K.
 
2014-07-07 06:20:02 PM
Isn't there actually a pretty big black market in counterfeit airliner parts?
 
2014-07-07 06:28:40 PM

Lamberts Ho Man: Ed Grubermann: Lamberts Ho Man: So what's driving this that makes it cheaper to part out a jet at half it's expected productive life?

Farking $650K winglets, that's what.

Right - so I'm still wrapping my head around the economics of it.  Why can those used winglets command $650K?  Why doesn't some manufacturer undercut that by say, $600K?

My guess is that somehow Boeing has strangled the market and prevented unapproved 3rd parties from producing parts for their aircraft without a licence/contract/etc.  Said license costing approximately $600K.


First, Boeing has a patent on the winglets through Aviation Partners (I think it's a joint venture), so I assume they are controlling the manufacture.  Even then, if a new set of winglets cost you $2 million, they tend to reduce fuel burn by 1-4.5%.  So multiply the fuel consumed per plane per year x 0.96 x $ of fuel and you make back that $2 million in a hurry.
 
2014-07-07 08:30:16 PM
Delta retired it's last dc9 earlier this year. It was built in 1979. 35 years in the air.
 
2014-07-07 09:32:01 PM
There is a DC-3 that flies from Long Beach (California) to Catalina Island daily.  Still in service if I remember.
 
2014-07-08 12:53:07 AM

thebigearl: Delta retired it's last dc9 earlier this year. It was built in 1979. 35 years in the air.


I think I flew that one back from ATL to DTW a couple years ago. Was waiting for Indiana Jones to pop up and say "It belongs in a museum!"
 
2014-07-08 11:29:39 AM
In the Southwestern USA, Marana, Mojave, Goodyear, Victorville, Kingman and Roswell are all swollen with 80s and 90s vintage jets

Sorry, incorrect.  They are swollen with 747s.  I'd guess 60% -400 and rest the Classics (for the 747s, anyway).  Kmjz is a true recycling yard, or was before Evergreen went under.  Not sure if MAS picked up scrapping for pop cans.

KMHV on the other hand, old 747 from the cargo companies as far as the eye can see (Southern, World, Atlas, etc.).

Bad time to run cargo.

/Don't miss desert runs.
 
2014-07-08 02:31:26 PM

Minarets: Lamberts Ho Man: Ed Grubermann: Lamberts Ho Man: So what's driving this that makes it cheaper to part out a jet at half it's expected productive life?

Farking $650K winglets, that's what.

Right - so I'm still wrapping my head around the economics of it.  Why can those used winglets command $650K?  Why doesn't some manufacturer undercut that by say, $600K?

My guess is that somehow Boeing has strangled the market and prevented unapproved 3rd parties from producing parts for their aircraft without a licence/contract/etc.  Said license costing approximately $600K.

First, Boeing has a patent on the winglets through Aviation Partners (I think it's a joint venture), so I assume they are controlling the manufacture.  Even then, if a new set of winglets cost you $2 million, they tend to reduce fuel burn by 1-4.5%.  So multiply the fuel consumed per plane per year x 0.96 x $ of fuel and you make back that $2 million in a hurry.


This. Winglets are fairly precise aerodynamic parts solely used for the purpose of drag reduction (aka fuel savings).

I'm surprised to hear about the Boeing/AP patent though. Do you per chance know how broad/limited it is in its scope, or at least the patent number? There are a number of things I'd be curious to know about it, as an aeronautical engineer.
 
2014-07-08 02:53:01 PM
Name smudged for privacy.

img.fark.net
 
Displayed 24 of 24 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report