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(Huffington Post)   "Why you should join a CSA" But I don't wanna join the Confederate States of America   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 13
    More: Stupid, CSAs, C.S.A.: The Confederate States of America, small farm, grocery stores  
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7445 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Jul 2014 at 6:03 PM (15 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-07 04:37:08 PM  
2 votes:
So my wife and I sprang for a CSA this year. That's right, my bacon-gobbling square old ass signed up with the most hardcore-hippie envirovegan farm in the region - not a piece of power equipment in sight. They use horses to till the fields.

Yeah, lots of chard and kale so far. But lots of the best damn strawberries I have ever had, also. It's too bad my wife ran out of time to make pie with them because she was so busy looking up chard and kale recipes.

So far the price is about comparable to the local supermarket, and with the CSA we know damn well we're not buying produce that looks good but tastes like cardboard because it's been bred to survive a trip from Chile, or that'll go bad the minute it's away from the display shelf.
2014-07-07 03:52:18 PM  
2 votes:

Lando Lincoln: I joined a CSA a couple summers ago. Lots and lots of vegetables that I hated. But such a variety of vegetables I hated!

But I did learn of green zebra tomatoes. That was a good day.


We tried it a few years ago, and had much the same experience.  Lots of vegetables that we didn't want, little of what we did want, and more expensive than going to the asian market to get what we wanted.
2014-07-07 02:07:24 PM  
2 votes:
So you can say "What the hell am I supposed to do with five pounds of chard?"
2014-07-08 05:20:03 AM  
1 votes:
Not to threadjock, but I have a heckuva lot of acquaintances from the deep south. Most are knifemakers and tend to be rather old-fashioned conservative. Most common statement after a couple of drinks is "The War B'tween the States had nuthin ' t'do with Slavery!" closely followed by statements about the tens of thousands of black troops in the Southern army, etc. etc. And how the real bigots always lived in the North.
To which the question "Then what was all that crap with the Klan after the war about?" elicits several seconds of crickets chirping for a response, followed by one person saying apologetically "I think that was Larry's great-grandpappy. He wuz a mean drunk."
2014-07-07 07:02:04 PM  
1 votes:
CSAs are the best way to support your local farm.

I don't care.  Mere proximity to me does not budge the needle on my give-a-fark-o-meter.

It reconnects you with how your food is produced.

I don't care.  I'm not trying to commune with the beast every time I eat a farking burger.  If shopping in store A instead of store B makes you feel connected to the land/earth mother/whatever, you're about as deep as a rain puddle.

A big box of farm-fresh produce put together just for you is pretty great.

Wow!  Just for  me?  But if I go to the grocery store and fill up a basket with the same shiat, who is that for?  Still me, yes?

CSAs are the best way to learn about new foods.

I'm betting the internet can supply more comprehensive information about more foods I've never heard of in 15 minutes than a lifetime of farmer's markets could ever hope to do.

You'll get to visit the farm and see where your food grows.

Wow, and I can pick my own produce, too?!  So you're saying they've found a way to get me to do more of the work, and this is being sold as if it's a farking favor to me?  Go fark yourself.

CSAs give farmers a chance to get the marketing done before their busy season.

I can see why the farmers would care about that.  Strictly speaking, it's not the customer's problem.

You save money on top-quality groceries.

Way to bury the lede.  This is the only farking thing on the list that's remotely compelling.

Your understanding of seasonal eating will expand dramatically.

Again,  internet.
2014-07-07 07:00:53 PM  
1 votes:

RoxtarRyan: I'd rather join one that does 5 things: Meat, potatoes, garlic, and onions. That's it. Nothing more, nothing less. Maybe peppers, but that's it. I don't need pounds of kale, lettuce or tomatoes.


That was 4 things. 5 including peppers. Maybe I could have the CSA do basic math for me as well, that'd be neat.
2014-07-07 06:54:43 PM  
1 votes:
I'd rather join one that does 5 things: Meat, potatoes, garlic, and onions. That's it. Nothing more, nothing less. Maybe peppers, but that's it. I don't need pounds of kale, lettuce or tomatoes.
2014-07-07 06:33:57 PM  
1 votes:
me and the GF did this a while back for a couple months. we had to go pick it up at 7am every saturday, and then we just ended up throwing half the stuff out anyway. and most of what we did use was "forcing it", so to speak, and that got old real quick.

i'm not sure these things need to exist. off the top of my head i can think of half a dozen alternatives that are much more reasonable (and realistic) than dragging my ass out of bed at 630 on a saturday so i can come home with a 20lb box of random produce.
2014-07-07 06:33:05 PM  
1 votes:

Mr. Right: Gulper Eel: It's too bad my wife ran out of time to make pie with them because she was so busy looking up chard and kale recipes.

And you are incapable of helping put up the chard and kale and making your own strawberry pie because ?  ?  ?


Hell, be lazy and buy some shortcake/pound cake and whipped cream at the store.  Sheesh.
2014-07-07 06:17:51 PM  
1 votes:
We have been CSA members for many years in the Seattle area, and we love it. Learned about kohlrabi, mastered stir fry with bok choy, gailon, and other tasty veggies, and the kid chows down on healthy fruit salads and leafy salads all the time. Any vegetable tastes good if you cook it up with a little bacon and onions, and oven roasted root veggies are winners in our house. By needing to get through what you receive each week, we eat much, much healthier during the harvest season. (June - Oct)
2014-07-07 06:10:21 PM  
1 votes:
If I already didn't have the garden in the back, I'd be down with joining a CSA.  I spent a year in a co-op and having to make meals with the random boxes of vegetables that showed up in the fridge taught me how to actually cook as opposed to just following a recipe.

But all the ones 'round here are pricey as hell anyway, so meh.  And only the larger operations have CSAs (although just 'larger' in terms of compared to other small farmers).  I help run a farmer's market and I think (?) none of our vendors have CSAs, although there is one woman who makes ready to eat meals from local farmers with a CSA style arrangement.

/shrug
2014-07-07 12:30:01 PM  
1 votes:
I absolutely love my CSA. I like knowing my farmers' names.

What I don't understand is why people, in 2014, continue to insist upon growing Swiss chard. I don't like someone delivering sadness to my doorstep, and Swiss chard is green, leafy sadness.
2014-07-07 11:42:36 AM  
1 votes:
I joined a CSA a couple summers ago. Lots and lots of vegetables that I hated. But such a variety of vegetables I hated!

But I did learn of green zebra tomatoes. That was a good day.
 
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