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(Huffington Post)   "Why you should join a CSA" But I don't wanna join the Confederate States of America   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 110
    More: Stupid, CSAs, C.S.A.: The Confederate States of America, small farm, grocery stores  
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7439 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Jul 2014 at 6:03 PM (10 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-08 01:23:24 AM
I'm already in CSA

www.sarna.net

Even too obscure for Fark
 
2014-07-08 02:41:29 AM

lindalouwho: ElLoco: They're pushing CSAs around here, although 90% of the veggies aren't grown within 200 miles of here.

There are stray fields of various peppers, tomatoes, and cucumbers, but all those are contracted. They pick enough to fill the contracts, then destroy the unharvested leftover crop because the contracts require that nothing from the field can be sold or even given away (as that could potentially encroach on their target markets.) I watched them shred and plow under about 100 acres of perfectly beautiful unharvested bell and jalapeno, and 20+ acres of tomatoes about 3 miles from me last year because of that. Cucumber contracts are usually open ended because there's always some place they can ship extra cukes for big bucks.

They don't donate it to food banks?!?

That sucks pretty damn hard.


Then those food bank clients would just get nourishment for free and that's not fair to the industrialists, lawyers and investment bankers who pay good money for fresh baby vegetables to dress up the plates beside their dry-aged porterhouse steaks. What kind of Republican are you?
 
2014-07-08 05:20:03 AM
Not to threadjock, but I have a heckuva lot of acquaintances from the deep south. Most are knifemakers and tend to be rather old-fashioned conservative. Most common statement after a couple of drinks is "The War B'tween the States had nuthin ' t'do with Slavery!" closely followed by statements about the tens of thousands of black troops in the Southern army, etc. etc. And how the real bigots always lived in the North.
To which the question "Then what was all that crap with the Klan after the war about?" elicits several seconds of crickets chirping for a response, followed by one person saying apologetically "I think that was Larry's great-grandpappy. He wuz a mean drunk."
 
2014-07-08 05:54:54 AM

DeaH: Gonz: I absolutely love my CSA. I like knowing my farmers' names.

What I don't understand is why people, in 2014, continue to insist upon growing Swiss chard. I don't like someone delivering sadness to my doorstep, and Swiss chard is green, leafy sadness.

Not if you saute it and add it to a ricotta tart (check with your  dairy CSA for fresh ricotta).



I read that as "salute"... twice. Time for bed, apparently, but I now have something new to keep me amused at restaurants.

/Gonna have to figure out what chard is eventually.
 
2014-07-08 06:41:15 AM

Gonz: I absolutely love my CSA. I like knowing my farmers' names.

What I don't understand is why people, in 2014, continue to insist upon growing Swiss chard. I don't like someone delivering sadness to my doorstep, and Swiss chard is green, leafy sadness.


The last several weeks have been full of red beets here. We can't keep up with the amount we're getting.

At least today, I think it's Jalapeno time! :)
 
2014-07-08 09:48:06 AM
We joined a CSA for the last 2 summers through a store that cobbled together a box from NY and NJ farmers. $25 a week for a box of mostly goodness. The local spice shop would occasionally throw in a spice mix too which was awesome. We'd boil, puree and freeze any vegetables we didn't get around to eating or just didn't like and mix it in with our dog's dry food. I learned to love swiss chard (with bacon and garlic of course) and loathe some other greens.

I don't know why but they closed earlier this year. We thought they were moving to a bigger, more accessible location (they were in a small store in a busy downtown that was a pain in the ass for pickups). The CSA - which ran from May through November - was extremely popular (long waiting list). They sold some other stuff in the store like local poultry, sausages and other good'ins but they were kind of pricey. Maybe that was their downfall.

We were going to skip it this year anyway as the last few months we've been busy buying a house and packing. Gotta find a new one for next year, but there's always the farmer's market.
 
2014-07-08 02:02:12 PM

meat0918: biatchaotic


Djoo just make that up?  Prolly, eh?  Noice.
 
2014-07-08 02:18:49 PM

420Counsellor: meat0918: biatchaotic

Djoo just make that up?  Prolly, eh?  Noice.


Looks more a filterpwn.
 
2014-07-08 02:45:38 PM

anfrind: 420Counsellor: meat0918: biatchaotic

Djoo just make that up?  Prolly, eh?  Noice.

Looks more a filterpwn.


yeah bit plus the ch from chaotic.
 
2014-07-08 03:06:48 PM

RoxtarRyan: Wow... just looked at the prices for local beef, and it is $9/lb, minimum 3lbs purchase, and I have to drive 20 minutes to get there. Or, I can go across the street from my condo, and get it for nearly 1/3 the price.


Wow, that's insane. Find yourself a local beef producer and deal with him directly. He'll probably be willing to raise a cow for you and send it off to be butchered. We did that and ended up with an entire deep freezer full of beef for less than $3 per pound. Generally speaking, you'll pay the farmer for the cow and then pay a meat locker for processing. If you don't know any farmers who raise beef, try to find a local livestock market, some sort of sale barn, and you can work from there. Either that, or find a meat locker - some place that does deer processing in the fall is usually a good start - and they can probably hook you up with a beef producer.

Now, that's all going to depend on what the livestock market is doing, but we were able to get the cow at essentially a wholesale price and then paid for the processing. Transportation from farm to locker was handled by the farmer (he's a relative, so he was doing me a favor, essentially) and we picked it up from the locker after it had been hung, processed, and frozen. As should be obvious, this requires an initial large outlay and storage space for a large quantity of frozen meat. Like, at least a 10 cubic foot deep freeze would be a good idea if you're getting a whole cow to yourself. You also will have to familiarize yourself with the butchering process to some extent so you can tell the locker how you want it processed - don't do like I did the very first time and say "...and then put everything else into hamburger" or you'll have 150 pounds of hamburger and come to know the true depths of despair.
 
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