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(Huffington Post)   "Why you should join a CSA" But I don't wanna join the Confederate States of America   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 110
    More: Stupid, CSAs, C.S.A.: The Confederate States of America, small farm, grocery stores  
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7445 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Jul 2014 at 6:03 PM (15 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-07 07:02:04 PM  
CSAs are the best way to support your local farm.

I don't care.  Mere proximity to me does not budge the needle on my give-a-fark-o-meter.

It reconnects you with how your food is produced.

I don't care.  I'm not trying to commune with the beast every time I eat a farking burger.  If shopping in store A instead of store B makes you feel connected to the land/earth mother/whatever, you're about as deep as a rain puddle.

A big box of farm-fresh produce put together just for you is pretty great.

Wow!  Just for  me?  But if I go to the grocery store and fill up a basket with the same shiat, who is that for?  Still me, yes?

CSAs are the best way to learn about new foods.

I'm betting the internet can supply more comprehensive information about more foods I've never heard of in 15 minutes than a lifetime of farmer's markets could ever hope to do.

You'll get to visit the farm and see where your food grows.

Wow, and I can pick my own produce, too?!  So you're saying they've found a way to get me to do more of the work, and this is being sold as if it's a farking favor to me?  Go fark yourself.

CSAs give farmers a chance to get the marketing done before their busy season.

I can see why the farmers would care about that.  Strictly speaking, it's not the customer's problem.

You save money on top-quality groceries.

Way to bury the lede.  This is the only farking thing on the list that's remotely compelling.

Your understanding of seasonal eating will expand dramatically.

Again,  internet.
 
2014-07-07 07:03:04 PM  

DeaH: That Guy Jeff: The fact that you can buy tomatoes any time of the year at the grocery store has left us all confused. Tomatoes grow in the summer and that's it. When you eat from your local farm, you have no choice but to eat seasonal options. It's good for us, for the farmers, and the earth.

What a load of shiat. Eating a variety vegetables, year round, regardless of the season, is good for you. And good for the farmers that grow them down in Mexico.

Except full-sized tomatoes taste like a load of crap in the winter. That's why we use only grape or cherry tomatoes in the winter, and just for salads or tarts. Otherwise it's canned tomatoes. Asparagus is my favorite vegetable, but it's really only good for a couple months of the year. The other ten months, the asparagus available are tough, shriveled messes. So, we have frozen or pickled asparagus in the months that it's not so good.

If you buy in season, the produce tastes better and it tends to be cheaper. But, hey, if you want tasteless, expensive produce, I, for one, will not stand in your way. I may laugh at you, but I will not stand in your way.


Buying canned tomatoes isn't eating seasonally. You're apparently being unhealthy and hurting farmers and hurting the earth.
 
2014-07-07 07:07:35 PM  

Gonz: I absolutely love my CSA. I like knowing my farmers' names.

What I don't understand is why people, in 2014, continue to insist upon growing Swiss chard. I don't like someone delivering sadness to my doorstep, and Swiss chard is green, leafy sadness.


It's the product of slash-&-burn farming...
"chard" v "charred" ...yes of course it's a terrible pun.  But you can't do anything else  with the stuff, can you?
 
2014-07-07 07:17:22 PM  

meat0918: If you can, grow it yourself.

Exercise + fresh veggies, it's a win win!!!!

//Sweet corn is over 6' tall already.


I've tried oh how I've tried, plants see me coming and die.

CSB

One year my mother and I tried raising the same tomato plants, mine on a screen porch, in a pot, watered every other day was destroyed by caterpillars, my mother's planted in the ground with no irrigation, survived despite the fact that she my father took a 3 week long road trip to visit friends and relatives.
 
2014-07-07 07:17:42 PM  

Mr. Right: And you are incapable of helping put up the chard and kale and making your own strawberry pie because ?  ?  ?


She's very territorial about the kitchen. My zone of culinary responsibility pretty much amounts to whatever can be cooked outdoors, plus bacon, fish, and alcoholic beverages.

I get to be territorial about loading the dishwasher, mainly because she loads the thing ass backwards.
 
2014-07-07 07:22:16 PM  

lindalouwho: ElLoco: They're pushing CSAs around here, although 90% of the veggies aren't grown within 200 miles of here.

There are stray fields of various peppers, tomatoes, and cucumbers, but all those are contracted. They pick enough to fill the contracts, then destroy the unharvested leftover crop because the contracts require that nothing from the field can be sold or even given away (as that could potentially encroach on their target markets.) I watched them shred and plow under about 100 acres of perfectly beautiful unharvested bell and jalapeno, and 20+ acres of tomatoes about 3 miles from me last year because of that. Cucumber contracts are usually open ended because there's always some place they can ship extra cukes for big bucks.

They don't donate it to food banks?!?

That sucks pretty damn hard.


It's a contract stipulation. Any excess can either be bought by the contractors at current market value if they exercise the option, or has to be destroyed. It can't even be donated without breaching the contracts. I've even asked if they'd mind if I picked a 5 gal bucket of various things to stick in my freezer before they shred it. No dice. And I mean they don't screw around... as soon as the last acre is designated to fulfill the last contract, they start destroying it on the other side of the fields before they've even finished harvesting.

From a 'we all live in the same world' point of view, it's farking stupid beyond reason, but what isn't these days?
 
2014-07-07 07:29:43 PM  

ElLoco: lindalouwho: ElLoco: They're pushing CSAs around here, although 90% of the veggies aren't grown within 200 miles of here.

There are stray fields of various peppers, tomatoes, and cucumbers, but all those are contracted. They pick enough to fill the contracts, then destroy the unharvested leftover crop because the contracts require that nothing from the field can be sold or even given away (as that could potentially encroach on their target markets.) I watched them shred and plow under about 100 acres of perfectly beautiful unharvested bell and jalapeno, and 20+ acres of tomatoes about 3 miles from me last year because of that. Cucumber contracts are usually open ended because there's always some place they can ship extra cukes for big bucks.

They don't donate it to food banks?!?

That sucks pretty damn hard.

It's a contract stipulation. Any excess can either be bought by the contractors at current market value if they exercise the option, or has to be destroyed. It can't even be donated without breaching the contracts. I've even asked if they'd mind if I picked a 5 gal bucket of various things to stick in my freezer before they shred it. No dice. And I mean they don't screw around... as soon as the last acre is designated to fulfill the last contract, they start destroying it on the other side of the fields before they've even finished harvesting.

From a 'we all live in the same world' point of view, it's farking stupid beyond reason, but what isn't these days?


Mine donates to a local food bank.

Also y'all are crazy- swiss chard is goddamn delicious.

I'm getting peaches this week!!! Can't wait.
Today I ate from my csa- cucumber, beet greens, spinach, and zucchini. And eggs.
 
2014-07-07 07:34:03 PM  

tallguywithglasseson: So you can say "What the hell am I supposed to do with five pounds of chard?"


Mine is obsessed with beets. Twice a month all season (june through nov)... beets.
 
2014-07-07 07:35:36 PM  
My wife and I do a small share of the local CSA. Lots of leafy greens I don't care for but I will likely live longer.
 
2014-07-07 07:37:14 PM  

INeedAName: My wife and I do a small share of the local CSA. Lots of leafy greens I don't care for but I will likely live longer.


Tell your wife that there is scientific evidence that you absorb the nutrients from leafy greens better when they're paired with fats. Enjoy bacon and sauteed kale. (Seriously there is - Google it).
 
2014-07-07 07:41:21 PM  

Gulper Eel: Mr. Right: And you are incapable of helping put up the chard and kale and making your own strawberry pie because ?  ?  ?

She's very territorial about the kitchen. My zone of culinary responsibility pretty much amounts to whatever can be cooked outdoors, plus bacon, fish, and alcoholic beverages.

I get to be territorial about loading the dishwasher, mainly because she loads the thing ass backwards.


It's ok to say "because that's a woman's job..." because it is.
 
2014-07-07 07:41:26 PM  

That Guy Jeff: DeaH: That Guy Jeff: The fact that you can buy tomatoes any time of the year at the grocery store has left us all confused. Tomatoes grow in the summer and that's it. When you eat from your local farm, you have no choice but to eat seasonal options. It's good for us, for the farmers, and the earth.

What a load of shiat. Eating a variety vegetables, year round, regardless of the season, is good for you. And good for the farmers that grow them down in Mexico.

Except full-sized tomatoes taste like a load of crap in the winter. That's why we use only grape or cherry tomatoes in the winter, and just for salads or tarts. Otherwise it's canned tomatoes. Asparagus is my favorite vegetable, but it's really only good for a couple months of the year. The other ten months, the asparagus available are tough, shriveled messes. So, we have frozen or pickled asparagus in the months that it's not so good.

If you buy in season, the produce tastes better and it tends to be cheaper. But, hey, if you want tasteless, expensive produce, I, for one, will not stand in your way. I may laugh at you, but I will not stand in your way.

Buying canned tomatoes isn't eating seasonally. You're apparently being unhealthy and hurting farmers and hurting the earth.


Actually, buying canned tomatoes is eating seasonally because they are picked and packed in-season, which is cheaper for manufacturers. And, if one cans one's own tomatoes, this is a guarantee.

If you must snark, don't stupid snark.
 
2014-07-07 07:44:40 PM  

xanadian: THE SLAW SHALL RISE AGAIN!


You been saving that one for just the right thread, haven't you?
 
2014-07-07 07:45:00 PM  
You better join the Crime Syndicate of Amerika...or else...

img2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-07-07 07:53:05 PM  

Tom_Slick: meat0918: If you can, grow it yourself.

Exercise + fresh veggies, it's a win win!!!!

//Sweet corn is over 6' tall already.

I've tried oh how I've tried, plants see me coming and die.

CSB

One year my mother and I tried raising the same tomato plants, mine on a screen porch, in a pot, watered every other day was destroyed by caterpillars, my mother's planted in the ground with no irrigation, survived despite the fact that she my father took a 3 week long road trip to visit friends and relatives.


Just taking a stab at diagnosing the tomato failure you describe.

Sunlight. I work in a garden center (I'm also in school to get a degree in Horticulture) and this time of year, the most common question I get is "what's wrong with my tomatoes?" I always start that conversation with this question "How much shade are they getting?". They'll go off about how their plants are under a tree, or on a porch, or by the side of the house, etc. They'll quantify it, "oh they get at least three hours of shade every day. You know, just to protect them from that hot mid-day sun".

Facepalm.

My favorite part of the conversation is the dead blank look on their faces when I tell them the shade they've just described is the problem. Tomatoes are a sun plant. If you want the vigorous, healthy, superproducing plants your grandparents grew, a minimum of 8 hours of sun is a non-negotiable necessity. Any less and the plant goes into survival mode, less fruit, less foliage, depending on the variety and the amount of light it's getting it may get really leggy, trying to reach for light, or it may dwarf itself. The roots will start pulling more nutrients from the soil, to compensate for the lack of sunlight, which makes the plant more attractive to pests that eat it, like caterpillars.

This would illustrate why crops are grown in wide-open fields, with no trees.
 
2014-07-07 08:23:43 PM  

DeaH: Smeggy Smurf: Both of the local CSAs cost far more than trips to the store.

I used to think the same thing, but then I tried the two-person CSA, and I found we had more money left over in the grocery pool. I think I figured out why, too. Fewer trips to the grocery store means fewer impulse purchases and non-food items. I just go to the store every couple of weeks to stock up on staples, as opposed to stopping in a couple times a week like I do if I rely on the store for produce. If you're great at making a list and sticking to it, this wouldn't help you, but it worked for me.

/locavore small premium is $26/week here


I have three WinCo Foods stores within a 7 mile radius.  Hitting the store is no problem for me.  I also have three large fruit stands within the same radius.  Rarely do I make an impulse purchase for food because I go full foodie on almost every meal these days.  You simply can't wing it like that.  The upside is Mrs. Smurf is steadily losing weight so it's worth the extra effort.

The CSAs would force us to wing it on the food more often than I would care to do.
 
2014-07-07 08:27:51 PM  

PolyHatSnake: Just taking a stab at diagnosing the tomato failure you describe.

Sunlight. I work in a garden center (I'm also in school to get a degree in Horticulture) and this time of year, the most common question I get is "what's wrong with my tomatoes?" I always start that conversation with this question "How much shade are they getting?". They'll go off about how their plants are under a tree, or on a porch, or by the side of the house, etc. They'll quantify it, "oh they get at least three hours of shade every day. You know, just to protect them from that hot mid-day sun".

Facepalm.

My favorite part of the conversation is the dead blank look on their faces when I tell them the shade they've just described is the problem. Tomatoes are a sun plant. If you want the vigorous, healthy, superproducing plants your grandparents grew, a minimum of 8 hours of sun is a non-negotiable necessity. Any less and the plant goes into survival mode, less fruit, less foliage, depending on the variety and the amount of light it's getting it may get really leggy, trying to reach for light, or it may dwarf itself. The roots will start pulling more nutrients from the soil, to compensate for the lack of sunlight, which makes the plant more attractive to pests that eat it, like caterpillars.

This would illustrate why crops are grown in wide-open fields, with no trees.


I suspect that they are naively assuming that tomatoes require the same treatment as non-edible flowering plants.

For what it's worth, I have successfully grown tomatoes in partial shade (I don't have a choice because I live in a third-story condo and no part of my balcony gets full sun), but they do take a lot longer to put out fruit and ripen.  Fortunately, it also stays relatively warm on my balcony during winter, so I can get away with planting seedlings very early to at least partially compensate.

Now I just need to get better about regular watering...
 
2014-07-07 08:35:17 PM  
No thanks. I'll buy what I want when I want it.
 
2014-07-07 08:38:00 PM  

That Guy Jeff: DeaH: That Guy Jeff: The fact that you can buy tomatoes any time of the year at the grocery store has left us all confused. Tomatoes grow in the summer and that's it. When you eat from your local farm, you have no choice but to eat seasonal options. It's good for us, for the farmers, and the earth.

What a load of shiat. Eating a variety vegetables, year round, regardless of the season, is good for you. And good for the farmers that grow them down in Mexico.

Except full-sized tomatoes taste like a load of crap in the winter. That's why we use only grape or cherry tomatoes in the winter, and just for salads or tarts. Otherwise it's canned tomatoes. Asparagus is my favorite vegetable, but it's really only good for a couple months of the year. The other ten months, the asparagus available are tough, shriveled messes. So, we have frozen or pickled asparagus in the months that it's not so good.

If you buy in season, the produce tastes better and it tends to be cheaper. But, hey, if you want tasteless, expensive produce, I, for one, will not stand in your way. I may laugh at you, but I will not stand in your way.

Buying canned tomatoes isn't eating seasonally. You're apparently being unhealthy and hurting farmers and hurting the earth.


You know what the earth did to me the other day?  It gave me a black eye and twisted my ankle when I drunkenly stumbled off the deck into the yard again.  fark the earth, I'm gonna go drunkenly stumble out to the deck and yell at it for a while.
 
2014-07-07 08:41:48 PM  

PolyHatSnake: Tom_Slick: meat0918: If you can, grow it yourself.

Exercise + fresh veggies, it's a win win!!!!

//Sweet corn is over 6' tall already.

I've tried oh how I've tried, plants see me coming and die.

CSB

One year my mother and I tried raising the same tomato plants, mine on a screen porch, in a pot, watered every other day was destroyed by caterpillars, my mother's planted in the ground with no irrigation, survived despite the fact that she my father took a 3 week long road trip to visit friends and relatives.

Just taking a stab at diagnosing the tomato failure you describe.

Sunlight. I work in a garden center (I'm also in school to get a degree in Horticulture) and this time of year, the most common question I get is "what's wrong with my tomatoes?" I always start that conversation with this question "How much shade are they getting?". They'll go off about how their plants are under a tree, or on a porch, or by the side of the house, etc. They'll quantify it, "oh they get at least three hours of shade every day. You know, just to protect them from that hot mid-day sun".

Facepalm.

My favorite part of the conversation is the dead blank look on their faces when I tell them the shade they've just described is the problem. Tomatoes are a sun plant. If you want the vigorous, healthy, superproducing plants your grandparents grew, a minimum of 8 hours of sun is a non-negotiable necessity. Any less and the plant goes into survival mode, less fruit, less foliage, depending on the variety and the amount of light it's getting it may get really leggy, trying to reach for light, or it may dwarf itself. The roots will start pulling more nutrients from the soil, to compensate for the lack of sunlight, which makes the plant more attractive to pests that eat it, like caterpillars.

This would illustrate why crops are grown in wide-open fields, with no trees.


No it was a failure because a dozen or so caterpillars made short work of all the leaves.
 
2014-07-07 08:43:22 PM  
CSA's: "Farming" for hipsters and trust fund babies.

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-07-07 08:48:15 PM  
So you pay in advance and they give you a random box of whatever happened to grow that week, whether you want it or not. In other words it's a vegetable of the week club.

I'll pass.
 
2014-07-07 08:50:14 PM  

Smeggy Smurf: DeaH: Smeggy Smurf: Both of the local CSAs cost far more than trips to the store.

I used to think the same thing, but then I tried the two-person CSA, and I found we had more money left over in the grocery pool. I think I figured out why, too. Fewer trips to the grocery store means fewer impulse purchases and non-food items. I just go to the store every couple of weeks to stock up on staples, as opposed to stopping in a couple times a week like I do if I rely on the store for produce. If you're great at making a list and sticking to it, this wouldn't help you, but it worked for me.

/locavore small premium is $26/week here

I have three WinCo Foods stores within a 7 mile radius.  Hitting the store is no problem for me.  I also have three large fruit stands within the same radius.  Rarely do I make an impulse purchase for food because I go full foodie on almost every meal these days.  You simply can't wing it like that.  The upside is Mrs. Smurf is steadily losing weight so it's worth the extra effort.

The CSAs would force us to wing it on the food more often than I would care to do.


There are valid reasons why some people don't want a CSA. Controlling the menu is one of them. But there are a lot of "full foodie" restaurants with changing menus based on what's in season. I tend to make us much simpler dishes in the summer and fall because the fresh produce is so good that I can get away with it. Tonight we had lamb kafta with whole wheat  cous cous confettied with chopped peppers and scallions. We had a large, mixed greens salad with thinly-sliced radishes, green onion, tomato, and goat cheese.Tomorrow is a zucchini and homemade chorrizo quiche with a marinated cuke and tomato salad. I may get up the gumption to make a Pavlova for the berries, or I might just serve them over cannoli cream (which is just the guts of the cannoli without the shell - easy-peasy). There will be left-overs of the quiche for a couple days, so it's just a matter of changing up the side veg. I don't do anything full-foodie until around Thanksgiving, but I salute you for doing it year round.
 
2014-07-07 08:51:04 PM  
Given the quality and quantity of farmers' markets around here, I see no need to "belong" to a CSA. I can do my part just by shopping at them regularly without being all trendy and neckbeardy.
 
2014-07-07 08:51:49 PM  
Wow... just looked at the prices for local beef, and it is $9/lb, minimum 3lbs purchase, and I have to drive 20 minutes to get there. Or, I can go across the street from my condo, and get it for nearly 1/3 the price.
 
2014-07-07 09:00:15 PM  

Gulper Eel: Mr. Right: And you are incapable of helping put up the chard and kale and making your own strawberry pie because ?  ?  ?

She's very territorial about the kitchen. My zone of culinary responsibility pretty much amounts to whatever can be cooked outdoors, plus bacon, fish, and alcoholic beverages.

I get to be territorial about loading the dishwasher, mainly because she loads the thing ass backwards.


OK, I understand.  It didn't come directly to mind that this might be the case because Mrs. Right is anything but territorial about the kitchen.  Or any other household chore.  Matter of fact, I would end up doing the chard, the kale, and the strawberry pie because her mother didn't teach her to do it, therefore it cannot be done.  I might also point out that her mother was a lousy cook.  Fortunately, I learned my way around a kitchen as a pre-teen.  Mostly out of self defense since my mother would simply refuse to cook if the mood didn't strike her.  The more I learned to do in the kitchen, the more the mood didn't strike her.

So when strawberry season is upon us (and we have our own rather large patch), Mrs. Right may refuse to pick them but she makes up for it by not helping with the cleaning, the jam, the shortcake, the freezing, or the clean up.  Comes time to eat them in whatever form, however, and she's Johnny-on-the-spot.  She will help weed the patch, however.  At least the part that can be done with the tiller.
 
2014-07-07 09:10:09 PM  
Beets.  Lots and lots of beets.  A river of beets.  An ocean of beets.  Every week, more beets.

I farking hate beets.
 
2014-07-07 09:17:05 PM  

Gonz: I absolutely love my CSA. I like knowing my farmers' names.

What I don't understand is why people, in 2014, continue to insist upon growing Swiss chard. I don't like someone delivering sadness to my doorstep, and Swiss chard is green, leafy sadness.


I actually have learned, thanks to my CSA, how to cook Swiss chard so it is tasty. I am so glad my CSA includes recipes for the ingredients in each box. Otherwise I would have no clue what to do with chard, collard greens, kohlrabi, or fennel.
 
2014-07-07 09:31:06 PM  
article and thread fail without mentioning:  http://www.localharvest.org/
 
2014-07-07 09:37:17 PM  
Well that was some self-righteous hippie bullshiat.

There are plenty of reasons CSAs are good. Those were just crap.
 
2014-07-07 09:44:10 PM  
Garden porn time.  It's a biatchaotic because some of the early season stuff is done and removed, and I'll let some of the flowers and dill go to seed and grow in the mini paths, and the neighbor hasn't trimmed up the top of the fence we just got done putting up.

These were on 7/3/14.  The corn has gotten taller since then, and the onions bigger.

i457.photobucket.com

i457.photobucket.com

//likes my tiny backyard.
 
2014-07-07 09:54:21 PM  
I'll happily join, provided I get to work with the hot android chick.

/too obscure for Fark?
 
2014-07-07 10:03:40 PM  
"Why you should join a CSA"

Cool Story, Asshole?
 
2014-07-07 10:30:18 PM  
If you don't want your electric appliances to shock you or start a fire, the CSA is a good thing.

s1.postimg.org

http://www.csagroup.org/us/en/home
 
2014-07-07 10:35:22 PM  

yarnothuntin: CSA's: "Farming" for hipsters and trust fund babies.

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 600x563]


+1

Every "A" is "CS", otherwise they'd make no money.   CSA isn't a thing, it's just a new hip name for buying and selling things.   For douchebags.
 
2014-07-07 10:37:52 PM  
CSA, which stands for community supported agriculture

Oh yeah, which community?
i.imgur.com
 
2014-07-07 10:45:54 PM  
Communism!
 
2014-07-07 10:52:48 PM  

morg: CSA, which stands for community supported agriculture

Oh yeah, which community?
[i.imgur.com image 193x261]


You know, the ones that need an organizer.

i141.photobucket.com
 
2014-07-07 10:57:38 PM  

yukichigai: TheYeti: I did a meat CSA...it was pretty awesome. However, if I do it again it will be the smaller delivery.Iit took me forever to eat it all down and I grill a lot.

Not quite a CSA, but when we had more money we used to buy in with a local rancher for some meat, mostly beef and pork.  Oh man, I have never had such deliciousness.  So much too.  I eat a lot of meat and I couldn't keep up.  It was amazing..


That is why the Good Lord gave us butcher paper and the chest freezer.
(Just finished the last of the two lambs I slaughtered a year ago)
 
2014-07-07 10:58:13 PM  
Well the local area was part of the CSA
 
2014-07-07 10:58:51 PM  

ElLoco: They're pushing CSAs around here, although 90% of the veggies aren't grown within 200 miles of here.

There are stray fields of various peppers, tomatoes, and cucumbers, but all those are contracted. They pick enough to fill the contracts, then destroy the unharvested leftover crop because the contracts require that nothing from the field can be sold or even given away (as that could potentially encroach on their target markets.) I watched them shred and plow under about 100 acres of perfectly beautiful unharvested bell and jalapeno, and 20+ acres of tomatoes about 3 miles from me last year because of that. Cucumber contracts are usually open ended because there's always some place they can ship extra cukes for big bucks.


It's a bit different here. Most of the CSAs guarantee that all produce is grown within 50 or 100 miles. And what they don't sell goes to a number of small markets and food co-ops.
 
2014-07-07 11:03:35 PM  

anuran: yukichigai: TheYeti: I did a meat CSA...it was pretty awesome. However, if I do it again it will be the smaller delivery.Iit took me forever to eat it all down and I grill a lot.

Not quite a CSA, but when we had more money we used to buy in with a local rancher for some meat, mostly beef and pork.  Oh man, I have never had such deliciousness.  So much too.  I eat a lot of meat and I couldn't keep up.  It was amazing..

That is why the Good Lord gave us butcher paper and the chest freezer.
(Just finished the last of the two lambs I slaughtered a year ago)


We actually bought a second freezer for the garage just to store the excess.  Well worth the investment.
 
2014-07-07 11:16:27 PM  

yukichigai: We actually bought a second freezer for the garage just to store the excess.


I read that as 'exes'
As in, all my exes live in Texas
Good idea either way
 
2014-07-07 11:41:38 PM  

Katie98_KT: tallguywithglasseson: So you can say "What the hell am I supposed to do with five pounds of chard?"

Mine is obsessed with beets. Twice a month all season (june through nov)... beets.


img.fark.net
 
2014-07-07 11:48:35 PM  
I enjoyed how the entire case for farm fresh over store bought in TFA and the strawberry one it refers to is seemingly one picture of couple strawberries posted by some guy.  Don't get me wrong, I can and have appreciate farm fresh produce, but can you at least pretend to do some journalism?
 
2014-07-08 12:15:34 AM  
I have a CSA Passport
 
2014-07-08 12:22:01 AM  

meat0918: Tried, and failed miserably. We end up with ants farming the aphids on the brassicas usually, and it isn't really worth it from a yield versus dollars (or calories expended maintaining) standpoint.


Most things aren't. I would hazard that tomatoes and squash *might be*. Which is why I usually grow crops I don't easily find in stores. I grow chard because it's an edible ornamental.
 
2014-07-08 12:33:01 AM  

PolyHatSnake: Just taking a stab at diagnosing the tomato failure you describe.

Sunlight. I work in a garden center (I'm also in school to get a degree in Horticulture) and this time of year, the most common question I get is "what's wrong with my tomatoes?" I always start that conversation with this question "How much shade are they getting?". They'll go off about how their plants are under a tree, or on a porch, or by the side of the house, etc. They'll quantify it, "oh they get at least three hours of shade every day. You know, just to protect them from that hot mid-day sun".

Facepalm.

My favorite part of the conversation is the dead blank look on their faces when I tell them the shade they've just described is the problem. Tomatoes are a sun plant. If you want the vigorous, healthy, superproducing plants your grandparents grew, a minimum of 8 hours of sun is a non-negotiable necessity. Any less and the plant goes into survival mode, less fruit, less foliage, depending on the variety and the amount of light it's getting it may get really leggy, trying to reach for light, or it may dwarf itself. The roots will start pulling more nutrients from the soil, to compensate for the lack of sunlight, which makes the plant more attractive to pests that eat it, like caterpillars.

This would illustrate why crops are grown in wide-open fields, with no trees.


Tomatoes are a tropic species with a vining habit. They want to be climbers. Tomatoes grew up with trees.
 
2014-07-08 01:02:12 AM  
Nice completely blank article. What's it about again?
 
2014-07-08 01:23:10 AM  

This text is now purple: meat0918: Tried, and failed miserably. We end up with ants farming the aphids on the brassicas usually, and it isn't really worth it from a yield versus dollars (or calories expended maintaining) standpoint.

Most things aren't. I would hazard that tomatoes and squash *might be*. Which is why I usually grow crops I don't easily find in stores. I grow chard because it's an edible ornamental.


Heh, that's why we grow artichokes.
 
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