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(YouTube)   Everyone on the right side of this Aerolíneas Argentinas jet probably needed new undershorts after this   (youtube.com ) divider line
    More: Scary  
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7502 clicks; posted to Video » on 06 Jul 2014 at 6:17 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-06 05:51:04 PM  
The foreshortening with the telephoto lens makes it look worse then it probably was.
 
2014-07-06 05:52:21 PM  
I'd say that is definitely worth a "Holy F*ck!!!" at the very least.
 
2014-07-06 06:37:16 PM  
Yaips!

Glad everyone and both aircraft are OK.

Barcelona has a really pretty control tower.
 
2014-07-06 06:47:57 PM  
That's why I always look both ways before crossing the active runway.
 
2014-07-06 06:54:12 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-07-06 07:00:22 PM  
So was this the fault of air/ground traffic control or did the argentinian flight go where it didn't belong?
 
2014-07-06 07:16:16 PM  
As a pilot I was taught to always to check the approach pattern before entering an active runway. This runway incursion is on the shoulders of the flight crew on the ground
 
2014-07-06 07:42:05 PM  

Tripletdad: As a pilot I was taught to always to check the approach pattern before entering an active runway. This runway incursion is on the shoulders of the flight crew on the ground


It's never too early to judge without knowing all the facts.
 
2014-07-06 07:51:24 PM  

fatbear: Tripletdad: As a pilot I was taught to always to check the approach pattern before entering an active runway. This runway incursion is on the shoulders of the flight crew on the ground

It's never too early to judge without knowing all the facts.


The crew is responsible for their aircraft. Don't need any other facts. Have you taxied an aircraft onto an active runway?
 
2014-07-06 07:55:47 PM  
15 years ago I was flying Southwest into Houston and had the same experience - except I was in the plane in the air.

Major thunderstorms going on, so the flight was delayed and I was worried about making my appointment. I was sitting over the wing, so I could see the flaps and feel the chunk-chunk of the landing gear.

On our first approach, we got into the glide path and then pulled out. Captain came on the intercom to say "There's a thundercell near this end of the runway, so approach control wants us to come around and land from the other direction. We should be on the ground in just a few minutes, and I apologize for the delays you've experienced on this trip."

5 minutes later, we're in the glide slope from the other direction.  Full flaps, gear down, over the perimeter fence.  Then they firewall the engines, retract the flaps, retract the gears.  Captain comes back on to say "Well folks, as you can probably tell, we're not on the ground yet.  Turns out that approach control neglected to inform me that there was still another plane on the runway.  I have expressed my displeasure to them, and I can assure you that we will be able to land safely on the next go-round."

/csb
 
2014-07-06 07:59:19 PM  
Probably happens more than you think
 
2014-07-06 08:00:28 PM  

Tripletdad: fatbear: Tripletdad: As a pilot I was taught to always to check the approach pattern before entering an active runway. This runway incursion is on the shoulders of the flight crew on the ground

It's never too early to judge without knowing all the facts.

The crew is responsible for their aircraft. Don't need any other facts. Have you taxied an aircraft onto an active runway?


I've taxied aircraft onto active runways hundreds of times, if not more, and while its good practice to clear the approach and departure ends it doesnt absolve ground or tower of their responsibilities. It similar to going through an intersection with a green light. Best practices is to clear both directions, but it doesnt absolve the opposing traffic if they blow the light.
 
2014-07-06 08:02:48 PM  

FrancoFile: Captain comes back on to say "Well folks, as you can probably tell, we're not on the ground yet.  Turns out that approach control neglected to inform me that there was still another plane on the runway.  I have expressed my displeasure to them, and I can assure you that we will be able to land safely on the next go-round."


On the one hand, you have to admire that kind of sang froid.

On the other, I suppose pilots who can stay cool under stress are the rule, not the exception.
 
2014-07-06 08:07:28 PM  

Chariset: FrancoFile: Captain comes back on to say "Well folks, as you can probably tell, we're not on the ground yet.  Turns out that approach control neglected to inform me that there was still another plane on the runway.  I have expressed my displeasure to them, and I can assure you that we will be able to land safely on the next go-round."

On the one hand, you have to admire that kind of sang froid.

On the other, I suppose pilots who can stay cool under stress are the rule, not the exception.


And all delivered with a Texas drawl, no less.

"Ai have expressed my dis-play-zhur to them..."
 
2014-07-06 08:15:49 PM  

Pop Goes The Weasel: Tripletdad: fatbear: Tripletdad: As a pilot I was taught to always to check the approach pattern before entering an active runway. This runway incursion is on the shoulders of the flight crew on the ground

It's never too early to judge without knowing all the facts.

The crew is responsible for their aircraft. Don't need any other facts. Have you taxied an aircraft onto an active runway?

I've taxied aircraft onto active runways hundreds of times, if not more, and while its good practice to clear the approach and departure ends it doesnt absolve ground or tower of their responsibilities. It similar to going through an intersection with a green light. Best practices is to clear both directions, but it doesnt absolve the opposing traffic if they blow the light.


Totally agree fatbear. Been there many times myself. My point was just that the PIC and flight deck crew have the final say and if I was cleared to enter active with that view I would have declined. The pilot of the approach aircraft did initiate an aborted landing. This is why we go thru runway incursion training. Safe flights. Best regards.
 
2014-07-06 08:16:36 PM  

FrancoFile: 15 years ago I was flying Southwest into Houston and had the same experience - except I was in the plane in the air.

Major thunderstorms going on, so the flight was delayed and I was worried about making my appointment. I was sitting over the wing, so I could see the flaps and feel the chunk-chunk of the landing gear.

On our first approach, we got into the glide path and then pulled out. Captain came on the intercom to say "There's a thundercell near this end of the runway, so approach control wants us to come around and land from the other direction. We should be on the ground in just a few minutes, and I apologize for the delays you've experienced on this trip."

5 minutes later, we're in the glide slope from the other direction.  Full flaps, gear down, over the perimeter fence.  Then they firewall the engines, retract the flaps, retract the gears.  Captain comes back on to say "Well folks, as you can probably tell, we're not on the ground yet.  Turns out that approach control neglected to inform me that there was still another plane on the runway.  I have expressed my displeasure to them, and I can assure you that we will be able to land safely on the next go-round."

/csb



My first (knee-jerk) inclination would be to say that I don't believe your story - I would (ignorantly) assume that no pilot would ever offer up that kind of scary detail to the passengers. But a very similar thing happened to me at LaGuardia recently - and I've often heard pilots tell us things (usually about the weather) that serve no useful purpose other than to scare the living feces out of everyone on the aircraft.  I will never understand why they share that kind of detail.  It's a bus with wings - just get us on the ground in one piece.
 
2014-07-06 08:20:57 PM  

Bolo Jungle: FrancoFile: 15 years ago I was flying Southwest into Houston and had the same experience - except I was in the plane in the air.

Major thunderstorms going on, so the flight was delayed and I was worried about making my appointment. I was sitting over the wing, so I could see the flaps and feel the chunk-chunk of the landing gear.

On our first approach, we got into the glide path and then pulled out. Captain came on the intercom to say "There's a thundercell near this end of the runway, so approach control wants us to come around and land from the other direction. We should be on the ground in just a few minutes, and I apologize for the delays you've experienced on this trip."

5 minutes later, we're in the glide slope from the other direction.  Full flaps, gear down, over the perimeter fence.  Then they firewall the engines, retract the flaps, retract the gears.  Captain comes back on to say "Well folks, as you can probably tell, we're not on the ground yet.  Turns out that approach control neglected to inform me that there was still another plane on the runway.  I have expressed my displeasure to them, and I can assure you that we will be able to land safely on the next go-round."

/csb


My first (knee-jerk) inclination would be to say that I don't believe your story - I would (ignorantly) assume that no pilot would ever offer up that kind of scary detail to the passengers. But a very similar thing happened to me at LaGuardia recently - and I've often heard pilots tell us things (usually about the weather) that serve no useful purpose other than to scare the living feces out of everyone on the aircraft.  I will never understand why they share that kind of detail.  It's a bus with wings - just get us on the ground in one piece.



As God is my witness.  That's as close to verbatim as I can remember after 15 years.  But the "I have expressed my displeasure" part will go with me to my grave.
 
2014-07-06 08:22:04 PM  
One more for FrancoFile:  I was on a Northwest flight (just before the merger) landing in Minneapolis. Wild weather, severe turbulence, etc. The whole package. My girlfriend, who joined me on that trip, was scared to death already. The pilot came on and said - I kid you not, "Folks, there is a tornado approaching the western end of the runway, but we're going to try to get in ahead of it."  Verbatim.

What in hell was I supposed to do with that precious turd of information!?!?
 
2014-07-06 08:23:45 PM  

Bolo Jungle: My first (knee-jerk) inclination would be to say that I don't believe your story - I would (ignorantly) assume that no pilot would ever offer up that kind of scary detail to the passengers. But a very similar thing happened to me at LaGuardia recently - and I've often heard pilots tell us things (usually about the weather) that serve no useful purpose other than to scare the living feces out of everyone on the aircraft.  I will never understand why they share that kind of detail.  It's a bus with wings - just get us on the ground in one piece.


Well, it's not particularly scary, and some people lose their shiat if they aren't told something about what's going on.
 
2014-07-06 08:24:18 PM  

Bolo Jungle: I will never understand why they share that kind of detail. It's a bus with wings - just get us on the ground in one piece.


I think you answered your own question there.....It's not a bus with wings and some people need to be reminded of the fact.
 
2014-07-06 08:28:42 PM  
I've never had to abort a landing, but I can't imagine it going well for the passengers on that plane, either.
 
2014-07-06 08:30:05 PM  

Bolo Jungle: FrancoFile: 15 years ago I was flying Southwest into Houston and had the same experience - except I was in the plane in the air.

Major thunderstorms going on, so the flight was delayed and I was worried about making my appointment. I was sitting over the wing, so I could see the flaps and feel the chunk-chunk of the landing gear.

On our first approach, we got into the glide path and then pulled out. Captain came on the intercom to say "There's a thundercell near this end of the runway, so approach control wants us to come around and land from the other direction. We should be on the ground in just a few minutes, and I apologize for the delays you've experienced on this trip."

5 minutes later, we're in the glide slope from the other direction.  Full flaps, gear down, over the perimeter fence.  Then they firewall the engines, retract the flaps, retract the gears.  Captain comes back on to say "Well folks, as you can probably tell, we're not on the ground yet.  Turns out that approach control neglected to inform me that there was still another plane on the runway.  I have expressed my displeasure to them, and I can assure you that we will be able to land safely on the next go-round."

/csb


My first (knee-jerk) inclination would be to say that I don't believe your story - I would (ignorantly) assume that no pilot would ever offer up that kind of scary detail to the passengers. But a very similar thing happened to me at LaGuardia recently - and I've often heard pilots tell us things (usually about the weather) that serve no useful purpose other than to scare the living feces out of everyone on the aircraft.  I will never understand why they share that kind of detail.  It's a bus with wings - just get us on the ground in one piece.


Oh, I don't know. It's nice to be informed. They're already flying a 600-ton vehicle through the sky. Why keep people in the dark about the rest of it? If you do, they'll just imagine the worst possible thing. The human imagination is reliable like that.
 
2014-07-06 08:44:30 PM  

FrancoFile: Chariset: FrancoFile: Captain comes back on to say "Well folks, as you can probably tell, we're not on the ground yet.  Turns out that approach control neglected to inform me that there was still another plane on the runway.  I have expressed my displeasure to them, and I can assure you that we will be able to land safely on the next go-round."

On the one hand, you have to admire that kind of sang froid.

On the other, I suppose pilots who can stay cool under stress are the rule, not the exception.

And all delivered with a Texas drawl, no less.

"Ai have expressed my dis-play-zhur to them..."


"Boy, I say, boy, when I bring this aircraft to a safe and complete stop, you and I should sit for a spell and have a little chat."
 
2014-07-06 08:48:41 PM  

Tripletdad: Pop Goes The Weasel: Tripletdad: fatbear: Tripletdad: As a pilot I was taught to always to check the approach pattern before entering an active runway. This runway incursion is on the shoulders of the flight crew on the ground

It's never too early to judge without knowing all the facts.

The crew is responsible for their aircraft. Don't need any other facts. Have you taxied an aircraft onto an active runway?

I've taxied aircraft onto active runways hundreds of times, if not more, and while its good practice to clear the approach and departure ends it doesnt absolve ground or tower of their responsibilities. It similar to going through an intersection with a green light. Best practices is to clear both directions, but it doesnt absolve the opposing traffic if they blow the light.

Totally agree fatbear. Been there many times myself. My point was just that the PIC and flight deck crew have the final say and if I was cleared to enter active with that view I would have declined. The pilot of the approach aircraft did initiate an aborted landing. This is why we go thru runway incursion training. Safe flights. Best regards.


Actually, that reply wasn't me.

Here is a possible reason it might not be the ground crew's fault:

"Argentine one two three, taxi to two-five right via Mike five, cross runway two without delay." The controller could have just flat-out misjudged the timing. Someone screwed up, but you're missing too many facts to assign blame.

You might even notice that for the Argentine plane to see the Russian, they'd have to look back 135 degrees over their shoulder at that particular intersection - it's a pretty sizeable blind spot.

I'll leave it to you to guess how many times I've taxied onto an active runway over the last 30 years.
 
2014-07-06 08:49:33 PM  

RoxtarRyan: FrancoFile: Chariset: FrancoFile: Captain comes back on to say "Well folks, as you can probably tell, we're not on the ground yet.  Turns out that approach control neglected to inform me that there was still another plane on the runway.  I have expressed my displeasure to them, and I can assure you that we will be able to land safely on the next go-round."

On the one hand, you have to admire that kind of sang froid.

On the other, I suppose pilots who can stay cool under stress are the rule, not the exception.

And all delivered with a Texas drawl, no less.

"Ai have expressed my dis-play-zhur to them..."

"Boy, I say, boy, when I bring this aircraft to a safe and complete stop, you and I should sit set for a spell and have a little chat."


FTFY
 
2014-07-06 08:50:20 PM  
20 years ago I was in the downwind for runway 23, Hemet Ryan broadcasting on unicom. As I was turning to base I could see two Cal Fire C-130s on the taxiway. I turned final, called final, and short and final and knowing I was there the two C-130s took the active.

I went around "almost in formation". Those two C-130s were so heavy, they used the runway and most of the field beyond it.

It was never my runway, it was always Cal Fire's field.

I loved my flights to Hemet where I would fly in for the soaring. Lots of fun stories for me.
 
2014-07-06 08:55:12 PM  

RoyBatty: 20 years ago I was in the downwind for runway 23, Hemet Ryan broadcasting on unicom. As I was turning to base I could see two Cal Fire C-130s on the taxiway. I turned final, called final, and short and final and knowing I was there the two C-130s took the active.

I went around "almost in formation". Those two C-130s were so heavy, they used the runway and most of the field beyond it.

It was never my runway, it was always Cal Fire's field.

I loved my flights to Hemet where I would fly in for the soaring. Lots of fun stories for me.


When that happens to me I double check the freq, look for the Tx light, confirm I've got the right com selected, etc before I assume it's someone else's fault. Of course, if you hear them announcing they're taking the active, that's about 80% of your troubleshooting already done.
 
2014-07-06 08:58:47 PM  
Flying into Tampa a few years back on US Scareways, we'd had an uneventful flight on a beautiful afternoon, about 200 feet or so above the runway getting ready to touch down when we go into one helluva serious climb, aka "shuttle launch position".

The captain announced that the flight that had landed just ahead of us had lost a tire and had we landed the pieces of said tire would have likely been ingested by our engines, making a bad day for everyone.

We had to circle the airport a few times while they cleaned up the runway.
 
2014-07-06 09:04:12 PM  

fatbear: Tripletdad: Pop Goes The Weasel: Tripletdad: fatbear: Tripletdad: As a pilot I was taught to always to check the approach pattern before entering an active runway. This runway incursion is on the shoulders of the flight crew on the ground

It's never too early to judge without knowing all the facts.

The crew is responsible for their aircraft. Don't need any other facts. Have you taxied an aircraft onto an active runway?

I've taxied aircraft onto active runways hundreds of times, if not more, and while its good practice to clear the approach and departure ends it doesnt absolve ground or tower of their responsibilities. It similar to going through an intersection with a green light. Best practices is to clear both directions, but it doesnt absolve the opposing traffic if they blow the light.

Totally agree fatbear. Been there many times myself. My point was just that the PIC and flight deck crew have the final say and if I was cleared to enter active with that view I would have declined. The pilot of the approach aircraft did initiate an aborted landing. This is why we go thru runway incursion training. Safe flights. Best regards.

Actually, that reply wasn't me.

Here is a possible reason it might not be the ground crew's fault:

"Argentine one two three, taxi to two-five right via Mike five, cross runway two without delay." The controller could have just flat-out misjudged the timing. Someone screwed up, but you're missing too many facts to assign blame.

You might even notice that for the Argentine plane to see the Russian, they'd have to look back 135 degrees over their shoulder at that particular intersection - it's a pretty sizeable blind spot.

I'll leave it to you to guess how many times I've taxied onto an active runway over the last 30 years.


Sorry for the misread. I agree with all of your points. I will always own up to my mistakes. As pilots we all make them. Won't try to guess the number of taxis you have made. I am sure it is a significant number. Safe flights.
 
2014-07-06 09:15:44 PM  
holy shiat, is this really Fark I'm on?

/Experts. Experts everywhere. Actual real humans who do the jerb in TFA, talking reasonably and intelligently about the topic.
//mind blown
 
2014-07-06 09:18:21 PM  

Tripletdad: fatbear: Tripletdad: As a pilot I was taught to always to check the approach pattern before entering an active runway. This runway incursion is on the shoulders of the flight crew on the ground

It's never too early to judge without knowing all the facts.

The crew is responsible for their aircraft. Don't need any other facts. Have you taxied an aircraft onto an active runway?


No shiat, i ALWAYS looked before crossing a runway, i don't care if ground told me i was clear to taxi to las vegas on the freeway.  People get confused, tired, and make mistakes.  Not hurting anyone if i glance out my window to see if a 747 is about to park on my head before i cross the active. Takes 4 seconds, and everyone goes home.
 
2014-07-06 09:21:20 PM  
My favourite recent event: getting screamed at by a tower controller when I didn't move onto the runway into the path of a 737 at about 200 feet.

He figured it out before I got to say something, unfortunately.
 
2014-07-06 09:27:46 PM  

uttertosh: holy shiat, is this really Fark I'm on?

/Experts. Experts everywhere. Actual real humans who do the jerb in TFA, talking reasonably and intelligently about the topic.
//mind blown


And not a single areola joke.
 
2014-07-06 09:52:26 PM  

uttertosh: holy shiat, is this really Fark I'm on?

/Experts. Experts everywhere. Actual real humans who do the jerb in TFA, talking reasonably and intelligently about the topic.
//mind blown


All the trolls have moved over to PPRUNE.
 
2014-07-06 09:59:57 PM  

worlddan: uttertosh: holy shiat, is this really Fark I'm on?

/Experts. Experts everywhere. Actual real humans who do the jerb in TFA, talking reasonably and intelligently about the topic.
//mind blown

All the trolls have moved over to PPRUNE.


And BeechTalk.

300+ posts arguing about how to fly a plane that's not even a Beech.
http://www.beechtalk.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=93856
 
2014-07-06 10:05:43 PM  
This video is an important reason why you always brief a missed approach before landing. Coming into a situation like this and not having an immediate plan can lead to very bad decisions, especially at crowded airports where you can not just pull up and go where ever you want. Without a plan, you are trying to pull up, add power, trying to configure the aircraft by putting up the landing gear, cleaning up other checklist items for a go around, radioing the tower, traveling 100+ miles per hour, all in the span of about 10 seconds before you are flying past the runway. It's very hard to think about where you have to go in that time span and doing all those actions.

Clearing active runways and taxi ways is always a must and is very easy to look over. You trust that ground control is giving you correct instructions and you also trust that everyone else is looking where they are going. Plus you are usually busy getting stuff done in the cockpit but all pilots should just stop everything they are doing for that quick glance before crossing taxiways and more importantly runways.

/The more you know
 
2014-07-06 11:31:07 PM  

fatbear: Tripletdad: Pop Goes The Weasel: Tripletdad: fatbear: Tripletdad: As a pilot I was taught to always to check the approach pattern before entering an active runway. This runway incursion is on the shoulders of the flight crew on the ground

It's never too early to judge without knowing all the facts.

The crew is responsible for their aircraft. Don't need any other facts. Have you taxied an aircraft onto an active runway?

I've taxied aircraft onto active runways hundreds of times, if not more, and while its good practice to clear the approach and departure ends it doesnt absolve ground or tower of their responsibilities. It similar to going through an intersection with a green light. Best practices is to clear both directions, but it doesnt absolve the opposing traffic if they blow the light.

Totally agree fatbear. Been there many times myself. My point was just that the PIC and flight deck crew have the final say and if I was cleared to enter active with that view I would have declined. The pilot of the approach aircraft did initiate an aborted landing. This is why we go thru runway incursion training. Safe flights. Best regards.

Actually, that reply wasn't me.

Here is a possible reason it might not be the ground crew's fault:

"Argentine one two three, taxi to two-five right via Mike five, cross runway two without delay." The controller could have just flat-out misjudged the timing. Someone screwed up, but you're missing too many facts to assign blame.

You might even notice that for the Argentine plane to see the Russian, they'd have to look back 135 degrees over their shoulder at that particular intersection - it's a pretty sizeable blind spot.

I'll leave it to you to guess how many times I've taxied onto an active runway over the last 30 years.


That would be my guess of what happened. The plane crossing the active was taxiing faster than heavies normally do. Either they were cleared to expedite across, took their time, then realized they actually needed to hustle at the last minute, or the ground controller misjudged the spacing with the plane on final.
 
2014-07-06 11:44:31 PM  
ATC'er here although I have been a center controller for the last 25 years and haven't worked in a tower since the late 80's. Watching that that still brought back that ugly feeling in the pit of my stomach for a few seconds. I wish we had a recording to see whether he was cleared to cross the runway or not.
 
2014-07-06 11:50:08 PM  

BeerLion: ATC'er here although I have been a center controller for the last 25 years and haven't worked in a tower since the late 80's. Watching that that still brought back that ugly feeling in the pit of my stomach for a few seconds. I wish we had a recording to see whether he was cleared to cross the runway or not.


There was no ganger here. It was a clear day and the landing environment was in view for several miles by the flight crew. The forced perspective made it look worse then it was.

They saw the other plane wasn't clear and went around.

This happens at busy G/A airports where there's a lot of training going on with pokey students not clearing the active? No panic, just add power and go around.
 
2014-07-07 12:09:42 AM  

fatbear: RoyBatty: 20 years ago I was in the downwind for runway 23, Hemet Ryan broadcasting on unicom. As I was turning to base I could see two Cal Fire C-130s on the taxiway. I turned final, called final, and short and final and knowing I was there the two C-130s took the active.

I went around "almost in formation". Those two C-130s were so heavy, they used the runway and most of the field beyond it.

It was never my runway, it was always Cal Fire's field.

I loved my flights to Hemet where I would fly in for the soaring. Lots of fun stories for me.

When that happens to me I double check the freq, look for the Tx light, confirm I've got the right com selected, etc before I assume it's someone else's fault. Of course, if you hear them announcing they're taking the active, that's about 80% of your troubleshooting already done.


Oh, I was definitely on the right frequency, and I wasn't the only one who noticed what happened. Hemet Ryan was always full of surprises like that. Out in the middle of nowhere, but a fun place to learn.
 
2014-07-07 12:15:09 AM  

BeerLion: ATC'er here although I have been a center controller for the last 25 years and haven't worked in a tower since the late 80's. Watching that that still brought back that ugly feeling in the pit of my stomach for a few seconds. I wish we had a recording to see whether he was cleared to cross the runway or not.


*slides you the most awesome beer I can find, whatever it might be*
 
2014-07-07 12:35:32 AM  

BeerLion: ATC'er here although I have been a center controller for the last 25 years and haven't worked in a tower since the late 80's. Watching that that still brought back that ugly feeling in the pit of my stomach for a few seconds. I wish we had a recording to see whether he was cleared to cross the runway or not.


CSB:

I was on a United flight at SFO listening to the flightdeck on CH 9 when we were cleared for departure on 1R while landing traffic was landing on the intersecting 28 L/R as is normal during clear conditions, it's just a matter of spacing.

We throttled up and travelled several hundred feet when tower came back and said in a very clear tone: United XXX (can't remember the flight#) ABORT! LANDING TRAFFIC 28R.

We didn't have to stand on the breaks as there was plenty of room left until the intersection but our crew responded (so it would be on the tape) BAD CALL! Then the SIC came on the PA to calmly explain we had to recheck something and taxi back to our departure point.

I don't know how many of us were on CH 9 and overheard what really happened.

/CSB
 
2014-07-07 12:36:13 AM  
*brakes

Firkin autocorrect. I previewed too.
 
2014-07-07 12:50:37 AM  

BeerLion: ATC'er here although I have been a center controller for the last 25 years and haven't worked in a tower since the late 80's. Watching that that still brought back that ugly feeling in the pit of my stomach for a few seconds. I wish we had a recording to see whether he was cleared to cross the runway or not.


We'll always have Tenerife.
 
2014-07-07 12:56:41 AM  

lohphat: *brakes

Firkin autocorrect. I previewed too.


Your mother's back thanks you.
 
2014-07-07 01:22:08 AM  
Over here in the US, there was a near miss in the air over Houston last week. Here's a local news report: http://www.click2houston.com/news/2-planes-nearly-collide-at-bush-iah / 26803322
 
2014-07-07 02:33:14 AM  
Great, why'd I watch this?  I'm flying tomorrow.  Now I've made myself paranoid...
 
2014-07-07 02:36:30 AM  

cyberspacedout: Over here in the US, there was a near miss in the air over Houston last week. Here's a local news report: http://www.click2houston.com/news/2-planes-nearly-collide-at-bush-iah / 26803322


Do you mean a near hit?
 
2014-07-07 03:15:16 AM  

morg: BeerLion: ATC'er here although I have been a center controller for the last 25 years and haven't worked in a tower since the late 80's. Watching that that still brought back that ugly feeling in the pit of my stomach for a few seconds. I wish we had a recording to see whether he was cleared to cross the runway or not.

We'll always have Tenerife.


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I'll never get over Tenerife.
 
2014-07-07 03:23:10 AM  

SteakMan: Do you mean a near hit?


ha - this puzzled me as a turn of phrase when I first learned it in English, but it's used like that all the time.

I think that beacuse it missed, but was very close, not that it nearly missed. It still sounds weird in my head, but many English phrases are far worse.
 
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