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(BBC)   Scientists show how to flirt with a chimpanzee, or ask one to groom you on a particular body part   (bbc.co.uk) divider line 19
    More: PSA, chimpanzees, great apes, quoted-printable  
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1011 clicks; posted to Geek » on 06 Jul 2014 at 2:17 PM (3 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



19 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-06 12:10:05 PM

i253.photobucket.com

 
2014-07-06 01:45:22 PM
Science is promoting Amimal Love?!?

/just kidding ;-)
 
2014-07-06 02:23:32 PM
The scientists will begin conducting human trials next week.
 
2014-07-06 02:25:30 PM
I just throw my...wait I have said to much
 
2014-07-06 02:26:33 PM

JasonOfOrillia: The scientists will begin conducting human trials next week.


Done in three. No, wait...

dailygrindhouse.com
Now it's done.
 
2014-07-06 02:41:58 PM
How about no.jpeg.

( I don't want my face bitten/torn off...)
 
2014-07-06 03:02:57 PM
 
2014-07-06 03:52:39 PM

skinink: Instructional video on how to flirt with chimps.

Odee odee Oh!


Jungle Love sung by black people in an article about chimps....

ts1.mm.bing.net
 
2014-07-06 04:10:35 PM
YOU GONNA GET APED
 
2014-07-06 04:41:38 PM
img.fark.net
 
2014-07-06 04:59:49 PM
No way

getgitty.com
 
2014-07-06 07:22:27 PM
Original article here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2757608/

"Intentional" or "unintentional" is an artificial distinction. What they're really talking about here is the degree of self-awareness the chimps have about how they use gestures. Lots of species are known to use communication to intentionally covey a meaning, contrary to what the BBC article says.

The real interesting thing here was that chimps were seen mixing and matching gestures as if they were words being strung together in a sentence. That puts chimps between humans and, say, birds. Between the wordplay we see every day on Fark - and static birdcalls that have one meaning, always have that one meaning, and are always used by themselves.
 
2014-07-06 08:15:21 PM

Fark like a Barsoomian: Original article here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2757608/

"Intentional" or "unintentional" is an artificial distinction. What they're really talking about here is the degree of self-awareness the chimps have about how they use gestures. Lots of species are known to use communication to intentionally covey a meaning, contrary to what the BBC article says.

The real interesting thing here was that chimps were seen mixing and matching gestures as if they were words being strung together in a sentence. That puts chimps between humans and, say, birds. Between the wordplay we see every day on Fark - and static birdcalls that have one meaning, always have that one meaning, and are always used by themselves.


Are bircalks static? It'll well documented partots can make novel phrases even in human language.
 
2014-07-06 08:25:41 PM

doglover: Are bircalks static? It'll well documented partots can make novel phrases even in human language.


You're right, sentence formation in African Greys: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parrot#Intelligence_and_learning
 
2014-07-06 08:27:13 PM
wtf

Throwing away unfetchable URL https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parrot%23Intelligence_and_learning: 400 Bad Request
 
2014-07-06 08:33:26 PM
Heh. I said static bird calks.
 
2014-07-06 10:47:17 PM
bonvito.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-07-07 01:10:31 AM
It's time.

img.fark.net
 
2014-07-07 09:57:24 AM
i58.tinypic.com
 
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