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(BBC-US)   You know how Eskimos have 50 words for "snow"? Well the British have nearly the same amount for "defeat"   (bbc.com) divider line 18
    More: Interesting, snookers, Mr. Green, European Cup, Northumberland  
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986 clicks; posted to Sports » on 05 Jul 2014 at 11:27 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



18 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-05 10:53:27 AM  
List fails without Roonied
 
2014-07-05 11:44:02 AM  

mikaloyd: List fails without Roonied


*shakes fist*
 
2014-07-05 11:46:37 AM  
What, no:

Dicky-birdied,
Feathered back on his Sammy,
Took a Waspy,
Flipped over on his Betty Harper's,
Caught his can in the Bertie?

List fail.
 
2014-07-05 11:55:34 AM  
No Farked either
 
2014-07-05 12:19:03 PM  
And it's weird that they are all in French.
 
2014-07-05 12:19:14 PM  
English has plenty of words for varieties of snow based on composition or how it falls - powder, slush, loam, sleet, hail, packing, sleet, flurries, flake, graupel, blizzard, snowsqual, thunder snow, colimns, dendrites, lake-effect snow, needles, rimmed snow, corn, cornace, crud, crust, hoar, firn, slush, etc.
 
2014-07-05 12:22:42 PM  
Thanks to Mr. Fry and his elves, I know that while the '50 words for snow' thing is horseshiat, Eskimos,  due to their 30 odd demonstrative pronouns, would be quite well equipped to describe exactly who is defeating the British.
 
2014-07-05 12:33:33 PM  

Amalevica: Thanks to Mr. Fry and his elves, I know that while the '50 words for snow' thing is horseshiat, Eskimos,  due to their 30 odd demonstrative pronouns, would be quite well equipped to describe exactly who is defeating the British.


His elves disproved the wrong myth though. They don't have 50 words for snow, they have 50 words describing types of snow, like the list meanmutton posted.
 
2014-07-05 12:48:20 PM  
If you can dodge a spanner, you canOWW!!
 
2014-07-05 12:58:24 PM  

meanmutton: English has plenty of words for varieties of snow based on composition or how it falls - powder, slush, loam, sleet, hail, packing, sleet, flurries, flake, graupel, blizzard, snowsqual, thunder snow, colimns, dendrites, lake-effect snow, needles, rimmed snow, corn, cornace, crud, crust, hoar, firn, slush, etc.


You like sleet and slush, apparently.

Also, slapping an adjective before a noun hardly makes that noun a new word.

And I'm pretty sure I've never heard anyone say "there's blizzard on the ground." I can't find a dictionary definition of blizzard as a type of snow. Or flurries, or snowsquall, or thunder snow, etc.
 
2014-07-05 01:20:08 PM  

Super Chronic: meanmutton: English has plenty of words for varieties of snow based on composition or how it falls - powder, slush, loam, sleet, hail, packing, sleet, flurries, flake, graupel, blizzard, snowsqual, thunder snow, colimns, dendrites, lake-effect snow, needles, rimmed snow, corn, cornace, crud, crust, hoar, firn, slush, etc.

You like sleet and slush, apparently.

Also, slapping an adjective before a noun hardly makes that noun a new word.

And I'm pretty sure I've never heard anyone say "there's blizzard on the ground." I can't find a dictionary definition of blizzard as a type of snow. Or flurries, or snowsquall, or thunder snow, etc.


http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Types_of_snow
 
2014-07-05 01:41:59 PM  

meanmutton: Super Chronic: meanmutton: English has plenty of words for varieties of snow based on composition or how it falls - powder, slush, loam, sleet, hail, packing, sleet, flurries, flake, graupel, blizzard, snowsqual, thunder snow, colimns, dendrites, lake-effect snow, needles, rimmed snow, corn, cornace, crud, crust, hoar, firn, slush, etc.

You like sleet and slush, apparently.

Also, slapping an adjective before a noun hardly makes that noun a new word.

And I'm pretty sure I've never heard anyone say "there's blizzard on the ground." I can't find a dictionary definition of blizzard as a type of snow. Or flurries, or snowsquall, or thunder snow, etc.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Types_of_snow


From the link:

The term thundersnow describes a thunderstorm which produces snow as the primary form of precipitation - not a type of snow

A blizzard is a long-lasting snow storm with intense snowfall and usually high winds  - not a type of snow

A snowsquall is a brief, very intense snowstorm - not a type of snow

A snow flurry describes a period of light snow with usually little accumulation with occasional moderate snowfall - not a type of snow
 
2014-07-05 02:11:07 PM  

Super Chronic: meanmutton: English has plenty of words for varieties of snow based on composition or how it falls - powder, slush, loam, sleet, hail, packing, sleet, flurries, flake, graupel, blizzard, snowsqual, thunder snow, colimns, dendrites, lake-effect snow, needles, rimmed snow, corn, cornace, crud, crust, hoar, firn, slush, etc.

You like sleet and slush, apparently.

Also, slapping an adjective before a noun hardly makes that noun a new word.

And I'm pretty sure I've never heard anyone say "there's blizzard on the ground." I can't find a dictionary definition of blizzard as a type of snow. Or flurries, or snowsquall, or thunder snow, etc.


Slapping an adjective before a noun is exactly how the Inuit language group works, kind of like how Germans can shovel all sorts of things into their nouns.

So if slapping an adjective before a noun doesn't make that noun a new word, 'Eskimos' don't have any more words for snow than any other language does.
 
2014-07-05 02:59:23 PM  

Super Chronic: not a type of snow


Sure it is. It's just a type of the verb version of snow, rather than the noun.
 
2014-07-05 03:14:10 PM  

meanmutton: Super Chronic: meanmutton: English has plenty of words for varieties of snow based on composition or how it falls - powder, slush, loam, sleet, hail, packing, sleet, flurries, flake, graupel, blizzard, snowsqual, thunder snow, colimns, dendrites, lake-effect snow, needles, rimmed snow, corn, cornace, crud, crust, hoar, firn, slush, etc.

You like sleet and slush, apparently.

Also, slapping an adjective before a noun hardly makes that noun a new word.

And I'm pretty sure I've never heard anyone say "there's blizzard on the ground." I can't find a dictionary definition of blizzard as a type of snow. Or flurries, or snowsquall, or thunder snow, etc.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Types_of_snow


A blizzard is a type of snowstorm, not a type of snow, same with lake-effect (though, I suppose that you might refer to the snow currently on the ground as being lake-effect), snow squal, thundersnow. Graupel and sleet aren't snow, either. Sure, they might have been at one point, but the same can be said about a lot of rain outside of the tropics.

And hail sure as hell isn't snow. It isn't even a winter weather phenomenon. It has an entirely different process of formation, what with being associated with convection.
 
2014-07-05 05:55:21 PM  
All these bullshiat phrases and 'whipped' isn't listed in these 48 or the original 62 either.
 
2014-07-06 12:58:30 AM  
I did not know people got so serious about snow classification.
 
2014-07-06 08:50:45 AM  

Summoner101: I did not know people got so serious about snow classification.


You should hear all the words for masturbation
 
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