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(LiveLeak)   Master glassblower creates an intricate horse sculpture in 1'35"   (liveleak.com) divider line 27
    More: Spiffy  
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3652 clicks; posted to Video » on 05 Jul 2014 at 7:31 AM (38 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-05 04:56:06 AM  
That was seriously all kinds of awesome.

I'd love to learn how to do that.
 
2014-07-05 07:39:32 AM  

Czechzican: That was seriously all kinds of awesome.

I'd love to learn how to do that.


Probably took him decades to get that good. Great find, subby
 
2014-07-05 08:01:34 AM  
I remember seeing this before, but not sure if it was on Fark. Still awesome. Only thing that might make it better is if was an attractive woman doing it. Bonus if naked.
 
2014-07-05 08:26:37 AM  
Guilty pleasure of mine is to go chill at the glass blowing house at Cedar Point.
 
2014-07-05 08:56:18 AM  
I would think He should get them in the annealing oven before they crack. But I am going to guess he knows what he is doing.
 
2014-07-05 09:21:27 AM  
1 foot and 35 inches?
 
2014-07-05 09:56:21 AM  
Awesome
 
2014-07-05 10:10:57 AM  
Curious - was there a point in burning the piece of paper at the end? Was it just to show how hot it still was or did that last little burst of heat help maybe take some of the stress out of the glass and made the sculpture more durable?
 
2014-07-05 10:22:08 AM  
I would love to have that kind of talent. Seriously impressive. I'd pay a 1.95 for that piece.
 
2014-07-05 10:23:05 AM  
That was pretty damn cool
 
2014-07-05 10:29:30 AM  

Slives: Curious - was there a point in burning the piece of paper at the end? Was it just to show how hot it still was or did that last little burst of heat help maybe take some of the stress out of the glass and made the sculpture more durable?


I think he was just showing how hot it still was. Glass has to cool slowly, or you get all kinds of crazy stresses. Check out Prince Rupert's drop.
 
2014-07-05 11:21:54 AM  

Slives: Curious - was there a point in burning the piece of paper at the end? Was it just to show how hot it still was ...


I'm guessing that previously dumbasses have gone and tried to pick the statue up straight away and showing that it's still hot enough to make things combust is probably a reasonably way of stopping that.
 
2014-07-05 12:26:06 PM  
My mouth was hanging open at that dudes skill.  I know absolutely nothing about glass blowing but that was freaking awesome.
 
2014-07-05 12:59:37 PM  
Nice pajamas.
 
2014-07-05 01:27:57 PM  

EvilEgg: Slives: I think he was just showing how hot it still was. Glass has to cool slowly, or you get all kinds of crazy stresses. Check out Prince Rupert's drop.


I had the same thought, either he is showing its temperature or someone asked to hold it.
 
2014-07-05 01:45:47 PM  
I met a master blower who was able to do something equally amazing in half the time. was SO worth the herpes.
 
2014-07-05 01:55:21 PM  
Some dude in his basement wearing boxer shorts displayed more dexterity in that 1 1/2 minute clip than I will ever hope to have.

Good show, chap.
 
2014-07-05 02:44:49 PM  
Technically lamp working, not glass blowing (tips fedora).

I learned some of this from an old chinese dude I worked with at an art glass shop who would make all sorts of critters. He got his start blowing lightbulbs as a child factory worker in China. He would make small animals for tourists, it was amazing to watch. I never got much better than penguins though.
 
2014-07-05 02:51:58 PM  
Compare with the video directly above.
 
2014-07-05 03:15:15 PM  
Ah yes, the horse.  I'm convinced they teach that in glassblowing 101.  Not that it isn't cool, but that exact horse seems to be made in every touristy glass blowing demonstration ever.  I have to wonder how many of those are made and then immediately melted back down every day.
 
2014-07-05 04:31:36 PM  
OK that was cool.  It was as if the glass sprung to life.  The starting moves were crazy, when the glass was still orange hot and not even able to support its own weight.  He kept having to rotate it to keep it from becoming one long drizzle all the way to the floor, but was able to use each turn to his advantage.

mad skillz.

Radak: Ah yes, the horse.  I'm convinced they teach that in glassblowing 101.  Not that it isn't cool, but that exact horse seems to be made in every touristy glass blowing demonstration ever.  I have to wonder how many of those are made and then immediately melted back down every day.


Kinda what I was thinking.  Every move is memorized.  He can bust that same horse out all day long without even thinking about it.  That'll be fifty bucks each, for two minutes work.

Slives: Curious - was there a point in burning the piece of paper at the end? Was it just to show how hot it still was or did that last little burst of heat help maybe take some of the stress out of the glass and made the sculpture more durable?


A warning to spectators that the glass is still incredibly hot though it now appears cold.  My guess is he does a lot of these shows and maybe in the past had someone naively try to pick up a finished sculpture.  "Plaintiff claims that Mr Glassblower should have foreseen that a typical guest would not know..."


EvilEgg: I would think He should get them in the annealing oven before they crack. But I am going to guess he knows what he is doing.


He's probably using borosilicate glass (Pyrex).  Inexpensive, common, easy to work and relatively immune to thermal shock in small scale.  He may have put them in an oven to ramp them down through anneal, we don't know.
 
2014-07-05 05:03:24 PM  

TheHoodedClaw: Czechzican: That was seriously all kinds of awesome.

I'd love to learn how to do that.

Probably took him decades to get that good. Great find, subby


More than likely.

I wish I could have a hobby like that.
 
2014-07-05 05:14:44 PM  

EvilEgg: I would think He should get them in the annealing oven before they crack. But I am going to guess he knows what he is doing.


He doesn't anneal beacuse it's just a demo item to excite the tourists into buying expensive finished products in the gift shop.  After they leave, those horses go right back in the furnace.
 
2014-07-05 06:23:57 PM  
I don't think they'd re-melt the horses and risk contaminating the pure glass batch with dirt picked up in the shop.

They're worth far more than their bulk glass value anyway now, even if just a few bucks at an off-brand site somewhere.
 
2014-07-05 11:50:00 PM  

alizeran: Technically lamp working, not glass blowing (tips fedora).

I learned some of this from an old chinese dude I worked with at an art glass shop who would make all sorts of critters. He got his start blowing lightbulbs as a child factory worker in China. He would make small animals for tourists, it was amazing to watch. I never got much better than penguins though.


Hey now, don't sell yourself short. If you can successfully blow any animal you should be proud; you shouldn't compare yourself to anyone else. So the guy you learned from could wrap his lips around that pipe and make magic happen, that doesn't change how impressive your talents are. The fact that you could set to work and make a penguin come into being is pretty damn impressive. You should be proud of your accomplishments.
 
2014-07-06 03:10:39 AM  
Making a glass horse doesn't qualify one as a master glass blower. You'd need to make dragons. Or just be William Gudenrath.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mB_Zn6x53JQ
 
2014-07-06 08:32:46 AM  
Went to the Blenko Glass factory in rural WV several years ago.  Manned by a bunch of country boys, many who had been there 30 plus years.  Watching them work was like watching a well oiled machine function. Everything moved along at an unhurried pace, every piece was where it was supposed to be at the exact instant it needed to be there and at the end of the process was some beautiful glassware made by true artisans.  It was mesmerizing, to say the least.  If you had questions or comments, they were very friendly and would speak with you and never break pace.  I stayed for over an hr and lost track of time.
 
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