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(USA Today)   Experts: in 10 years, every human on the planet will have internet access   (usatoday.com) divider line 54
    More: Unlikely, internet, Berkman Center for Internet & Society, criticism of capitalism  
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1229 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Jul 2014 at 1:17 PM (3 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-04 11:00:23 AM
No, they won't.

The majority certainly will have access options if they can afford it, but even with satellite access, some places that don't have electricity won't have effective access.
 
2014-07-04 12:13:58 PM
I want the OASIS.

Or a BrainPal.
 
2014-07-04 12:21:36 PM
I'd be impressed if every human on the planet had access to clean drinking water...
 
2014-07-04 01:07:26 PM
...and I'll still be on 6Mbps DSL.
 
2014-07-04 01:23:20 PM
And if they have $5 a month, they can all have Total Fark and Drew will be a gazillionaire.
 
2014-07-04 01:27:03 PM
Uhh, let's get them all indoor plumbing and food first, shall we?
 
2014-07-04 01:31:06 PM
Finally, they'll be able to download clean water.
 
2014-07-04 01:32:24 PM

Mentalpatient87: Uhh, let's get them all indoor plumbing and food first, shall we?


Food/water yeah, but if I had the option between indoor plumbing and internet, I might go with internet
 
2014-07-04 01:35:02 PM
They will also hate Bill Cowher.
 
2014-07-04 01:36:13 PM

dittybopper: some places that don't have electricity won't have effective access.


Solar/wind, batteries and wireless. Power requirements keep dipping lower and lower.
 
2014-07-04 01:37:12 PM

Indolent: I want the OASIS.

Or a BrainPal.


My Brainpal is an Asshole.
 
2014-07-04 01:42:50 PM

hankhorsey: Finally, they'll be able to download clean water.


Well, in theory bringing internet access means they'll be able to get schematics for purification systems and information on identifying clean water sources in the first place.

In practice, there will be pictures of cats.
 
2014-07-04 01:43:14 PM
Wait.  Will it be through Comcast?
 
2014-07-04 01:49:55 PM
www.troll.me
 
2014-07-04 01:52:54 PM

dittybopper: No, they won't.

The majority certainly will have access options if they can afford it, but even with satellite access, some places that don't have electricity won't have effective access.


Between advancements in solar power & smart phones and Google's fleet of air-borne long-range hot spots I think it'll be a lot more prevalent then we give credit.  Hell I was given a neat little solar powered backup battery based phone charger as swag at some IT conference.

Okay okay ignore Detroit though.
 
2014-07-04 01:57:39 PM

hankhorsey: Finally, they'll be able to download clean water.


Um, no. They would need a 3D printer first.
 
2014-07-04 01:59:37 PM
good.  maybe they'll start using youporn instead of endlessly reproducing.
 
2014-07-04 02:05:21 PM
About 1/4 of the world's population doesn't have electricity.  Many of those places also have literacy issues.  Maybe we should work on those things first?
 
2014-07-04 02:07:12 PM
That's a lot of Starbucks.
 
2014-07-04 02:08:41 PM
every person in the world will get to enjoy the endless commercials and commercial web sites that browsers  list in search results for only $80 dollars a month. great
 
2014-07-04 02:12:09 PM

Candygram4Mongo: I'd be impressed if every human on the planet had access to clean drinking water...


My first thought also. Food would also be good.

tomusarcanum.files.wordpress.com

These kids demand twitter!
 
2014-07-04 02:14:33 PM

hankhorsey: Finally, they'll be able to download clean water.


They can get it streaming.
 
2014-07-04 02:22:27 PM
First line from the article:

On the eve of Independence Day, a who's who of computer experts say that government control, consumer distrust and corporate greed threaten the future of the Internet as we know it,

A more succinct rephrasing of that:

On the eve of Independence Day, a who's who of computer experts say that government control, consumer distrust and corporate greed people threaten the future of the Internet as we know it,
 
2014-07-04 02:31:37 PM
img.fark.net
 
2014-07-04 02:32:26 PM
www.minterdial.com
 
2014-07-04 02:35:30 PM

PvtStash: First line from the article:

On the eve of Independence Day, a who's who of computer experts say that government control, consumer distrust and corporate greed threaten the future of the Internet as we know it,

A more succinct rephrasing of that:

On the eve of Independence Day, a who's who of computer experts say that government control, consumer distrust and corporate greed people threaten the future of the Internet as we know it,


The "internet as we know it" hasn't existed in quite some time:

http://www.wired.com/2014/06/net_neutrality_missing
 
2014-07-04 02:55:01 PM

dittybopper: No, they won't.

The majority certainly will have access options if they can afford it, but even with satellite access, some places that don't have electricity won't have effective access.




Don't forget the politics of this.
Not every nation is ready to allow unfettered access to the network. Even after the equipment side of things is dealt with.

/then there's good old fashioned illiteracy to contend with.
 
2014-07-04 02:57:33 PM
Oh good. Now they can access WebMD and finally get some basic medical care.
 
2014-07-04 03:09:17 PM
Papua New Guinea suggests otherwise.
 
2014-07-04 03:17:17 PM
It's the smartphone. Now today almost everyone on the planet has "access" to a cell phone. Somebody in the village pedals a generator. There are now 5.5 billion (with a B) cell phone subscribers worldwide and 8 billion farking mobile devices on the planet. About 40% are smart phones or tablets and they account for 70% of sales. Increasingly more people are using the phone for internet or shall we more properly say "the web". Also percentage of retail purchases are shifting to the phone. No device in human history has a faster adoption rate than the cell phone.
 
2014-07-04 03:17:30 PM

MachineHead: dittybopper: some places that don't have electricity won't have effective access.

Solar/wind, batteries and wireless. Power requirements keep dipping lower and lower.


Not low enough for some people.  The vast overwhelming majority of people have potential access to infrastructure.  But there are those who don't.
 
2014-07-04 03:20:40 PM

CDEDBDVD: Papua New Guinea suggests otherwise.


Exactly.  And the gap between the typical New Guinean, and the most remote New Guinean is at least as big as the gap between the typical American and the typical New Guinean.
 
2014-07-04 03:27:02 PM

Nocrash: Now today almost everyone on the planet has "access" to a cell phone. Somebody in the village pedals a generator.


This is an unrealistic and naive perspective of how remote and primitive some places are.
 
2014-07-04 03:44:36 PM
Coming soon to a theater near you.  "The Mods Must be Crazy"
 
2014-07-04 04:04:51 PM
I thought we were all gonna have the HIV by then
well, those of us left after the global warming kills the world
or something
whatever

can we stop going berzerk over GMO food and feed those kids?
 
2014-07-04 04:12:06 PM

MachineHead: dittybopper: some places that don't have electricity won't have effective access.

Solar/wind, batteries and wireless. Power requirements keep dipping lower and lower.


Well, there is a limit to how low you can go.  Wireless costs amps.  You're transmitting, even if it's just ACKs, and you aren't going to get around that.

Plus, for a really remote location, you're talking satellite, and for that you're talking something with some decent transmit power.

I'm not saying you *CAN'T* do it, heck, right now with RMS Express on my netbook and a battery powered ham radio I can access my e-mail from anywhere on the surface of the Earth, and quite probably from low orbit also.

I just question if in 10 years the costs are going to come down far enough that someone who makes $20 a month is going to be able to do it.
 
2014-07-04 04:25:02 PM
Al Gore Telephone Tax
 
2014-07-04 04:27:14 PM

Nocrash: It's the smartphone. Now today almost everyone on the planet has "access" to a cell phone. Somebody in the village pedals a generator. There are now 5.5 billion (with a B) cell phone subscribers worldwide and 8 billion farking mobile devices on the planet. About 40% are smart phones or tablets and they account for 70% of sales. Increasingly more people are using the phone for internet or shall we more properly say "the web". Also percentage of retail purchases are shifting to the phone. No device in human history has a faster adoption rate than the cell phone.


Cell phones, in the modern sense, were invented in 1973.  They didn't start becoming a noticeable thing until the 1980's.  They weren't commonly used by the hoi polloi until the 1990s.   Depending on how you look at it, it took between 30 and 40 years to get to this point.

Broadcast radio had a *MUCH* quicker adoption rate.
 
2014-07-04 04:29:06 PM
Great net access but no electricity to utilize it. Guess they won't have to worry about capacity issues.
 
2014-07-04 04:53:57 PM

Indolent: I want the OASIS.

Or a BrainPal.


I'd like one of those Lumic EarPod things...
 
2014-07-04 05:00:01 PM
dittybopper:

I just question if in 10 years the costs are going to come down far enough that someone who makes $20 a month is going to be able to do it.

More like $20 a year in some places.  There are a handful of places--not many but a couple-- where modern money is still meaningless.
 
2014-07-04 05:09:46 PM

PanicMan: About 1/4 of the world's population doesn't have electricity.  Many of those places also have literacy issues.


They can write political comments in exchange for electricity. Problem solved.
 
2014-07-04 05:43:38 PM

dittybopper: I just question if in 10 years the costs are going to come down far enough that someone who makes $20 a month is going to be able to do it.


As long as outside subsidies exist?  Sure!

Why wouldn't some multinational monolith like IBM donate millions of dollars' worth of solar panels and cellular radios to the poorest and most remote communities in the world?  It's good PR  and a new source of cheap labor.
 
2014-07-04 05:47:27 PM

dittybopper: The majority certainly will have access options if they can afford it, but even with satellite access, some places that don't have electricity won't have effective access.


You may be surprised.

Say, when I was in Cambodia, most of it doesn't have any electricity. But nearly everyone, especially young people, have a phone with internet. They charge it from car batteries and similar sources of energy. Internet is, like, $5/month, with youtube and stuff.

Phone towers use solar power.
 
2014-07-04 06:05:21 PM

nickdaisy: good.  maybe they'll start using youporn instead of endlessly reproducing.


Experience has shown time and time again that when a population is literate, women have access to birth control, and basic healthcare taken care of, the birth rate plummets. It is by far the easiest and fastest way to halt a population explosion. Of course this was all before LEDs became cheap and lightweight enough to be placed on blimps. If Google creates porn blimps instead of internet balloons, youporn might be an important part of the solution.
 
2014-07-04 06:33:27 PM

hankhorsey: Finally, they'll be able to download clean water.


ha
 
2014-07-04 06:38:01 PM

Grahor: dittybopper: The majority certainly will have access options if they can afford it, but even with satellite access, some places that don't have electricity won't have effective access.

You may be surprised.

Say, when I was in Cambodia, most of it doesn't have any electricity. But nearly everyone, especially young people, have a phone with internet. They charge it from car batteries and similar sources of energy. Internet is, like, $5/month, with youtube and stuff.

Phone towers use solar power.


I'm not actually, but Cambodia is actually fairly small, just a bit bigger than New York State and smaller than Kansas.

I'm also willing to bet you can't get a cell signal everywhere in Cambodia.  There are still parts of New York State that aren't covered (but it's all electrified).
 
2014-07-04 06:39:18 PM

poot_rootbeer: dittybopper: I just question if in 10 years the costs are going to come down far enough that someone who makes $20 a month is going to be able to do it.

As long as outside subsidies exist?  Sure!

Why wouldn't some multinational monolith like IBM donate millions of dollars' worth of solar panels and cellular radios to the poorest and most remote communities in the world?  It's good PR  and a new source of cheap labor.


Hey, I know, let's get someone *ELSE* to pay it!
 
2014-07-04 08:41:52 PM
Anybody know where I can score some BTL?
 
2014-07-04 09:37:06 PM
You think they hate the US now...
 
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