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(New Zealand Herald)   Radioactive room so dangerous that no one has entered since 1976 can be found in A: Russia, B: Japan, C: Washington State   (nzherald.co.nz ) divider line
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15567 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Jul 2014 at 4:40 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-03 02:52:50 PM  
media.nzherald.co.nz

Looks like I picked the wrong week to stop sniffing Americium.
 
2014-07-03 02:55:36 PM  
The answer is always "The Hanford."

As bad as exploding reactors (Chernobyl), exploding containment buildings (Fukushima) and fuel element failures (TMI) in power reactors are, plutonium is vastly worse.  Plutonium, if I recall correctly, is the most dangerous (toxicity, radioactivity, carcinogenic measure) substance in the world.
 
2014-07-03 03:01:37 PM  
He didn't develop superpowers? That's disappointing. I mean, you get hit with a large dose of radiation you kind of expect to develop superpowers.
 
2014-07-03 03:02:16 PM  

factoryconnection: Plutonium, if I recall correctly, is the most dangerous (toxicity, radioactivity, carcinogenic measure) substance in the world.


You're thinking of a Fox News broadcast...
 
2014-07-03 03:27:41 PM  
Curiously enough, there is a high incidence of babies being born with extreme 'anomalies' within a radius of Hanford. Mindboggling it is.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-03 03:36:14 PM  
Inside of Hanford, radioactive furniture.

Outside of Hanford, radioactive tumbleweed.
Might still be safer than the Aral sea.
 
2014-07-03 03:48:42 PM  
a 1976 blast in the United States that exposed a technician to a massive dose of radiation and led to his nickname: the "Atomic Man."


38.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-07-03 04:44:30 PM  
Dangerous? What a load of BS, radiation is good for you.
 
2014-07-03 04:45:08 PM  
Interesting story.

Have they figured out how to stop the plume of contaminants it's way towards the Columbia?

columbia-institute.org
 
2014-07-03 04:46:26 PM  

Harold McCluskey, then 64, was working in the room at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation when a chemical reaction caused a glass glove box to explode.

He was exposed to the highest dose of radiation from the chemical element americium ever recorded - 500 times the occupational standard.
...
Covered with blood, McCluskey was dragged from the room and put into an ambulance headed for the decontamination center. Because he was too hot to handle, he was removed by remote control and transported to a steel-and-concrete isolation tank.

During the next five months, doctors laboriously extracted tiny bits of glass and razor-sharp pieces of metal embedded in his skin.

Nurses scrubbed him down three times a day and shaved every inch of his body every day. The radioactive bathwater and thousands of towels became nuclear waste.


Holy cow... And he really was close to retirement when this happened. :-(
 
2014-07-03 04:50:12 PM  
Subbys bathroom?
 
2014-07-03 04:50:27 PM  
That's a depressing article.
 
2014-07-03 04:50:38 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: He didn't develop superpowers? That's disappointing. I mean, you get hit with a large dose of radiation you kind of expect to develop superpowers.


Yeah, a freak nuclear lab accident, that's supposed to give you superpowers.

I'd rather get the Dr. Manhattan set than the Incredible Hulk set, but I'd take what I can get.

Massive loss of stamina, kidney infections, multiple heart attacks, cornea transplants, and massive drop in blood platelets?  Dang, he really lost out on the Lab Accident Superpowers lotto.
 
2014-07-03 04:50:39 PM  

meat0918: Interesting story.

Have they figured out how to stop the plume of contaminants it's way towards the Columbia?

[columbia-institute.org image 713x372]


Nope.
 
2014-07-03 04:52:24 PM  
Exposure to that much Americium must have made him feel really patriotic.
 
2014-07-03 04:53:36 PM  

neversubmit: Dangerous? What a load of BS, radiation is good for you.


Ra-di-a-tion. Yes, indeed. You hear the mostoutrageous lies about it. Half-baked goggle-box do-gooders telling everybody it's bad for you. Pernicious nonsense! Everybody could stand a hundred chest X-rays a year! They oughta have 'em, too.
 
2014-07-03 04:54:00 PM  
Wow. Lived 11 more years and died of arterial disease.
 
2014-07-03 04:54:45 PM  

duffblue: That's a depressing article.


it really is. poor bastard.
 
2014-07-03 04:55:25 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: He didn't develop superpowers? That's disappointing. I mean, you get hit with a large dose of radiation you kind of expect to develop superpowers.


They haven't been able to replicate the effects of the intrinsic field generator, perhaps because the other victims didnt have the right temperment.
 
2014-07-03 04:57:23 PM  

Silverstaff: Sin_City_Superhero: He didn't develop superpowers? That's disappointing. I mean, you get hit with a large dose of radiation you kind of expect to develop superpowers.

Yeah, a freak nuclear lab accident, that's supposed to give you superpowers.

I'd rather get the Dr. Manhattan set than the Incredible Hulk set, but I'd take what I can get.

Massive loss of stamina, kidney infections, multiple heart attacks, cornea transplants, and massive drop in blood platelets?  Dang, he really lost out on the Lab Accident Superpowers lotto.


Like the Thousand vs Spider-man.
 
2014-07-03 04:57:26 PM  
Don't you sort of sign-on to the chance of "accident that fries me to a glowing hue" when you are handling stuff like this for a living?
 
2014-07-03 05:00:32 PM  

neversubmit: Dangerous? What a load of BS, radiation is good for you.


The guy running in Oregon's District 4 for congress would dispose of nuclear waste by incorporating it into the foundations of people's homes and sprinkling it over the Midwest.

Thank goodness he'll lose.

At least he better goddamn lose.  I don't really want a guy with Robinson's level of crazy in the House representing me.

//Plus his foundation solicited me for my piss.
 
2014-07-03 05:01:39 PM  
Dayum. He got a 500x safe exposure dose of Americium and survived to tell the tale. I got a 4x safe exposure dose (Strontium 90) while in the Navy. It was enough to get me medically discharged almost immediately after decontamination.

/melanoma twice since then
 
2014-07-03 05:01:59 PM  

neversubmit: Dangerous? What a load of BS, radiation is good for you.


Some is, some doesn't really do anything to you and some of it is bad for you.  This was the bad sort.
 
2014-07-03 05:02:26 PM  
abload.de
 
2014-07-03 05:03:27 PM  

meat0918: Interesting story.

Have they figured out how to stop the plume of contaminants it's way towards the Columbia?


A friends Granfather told me the story if how he came to work security at the Manhatten Project during the initial A bomb testing.

He said all the guards in the down wind side got cancer and died very quickly.

/he was up wind
 
2014-07-03 05:03:59 PM  
factoryconnection:
Plutonium, if I recall correctly, is the most dangerous (toxicity, radioactivity, carcinogenic measure) substance in the world.

Plutonium is nowhere near the top at any of those three. For that matter, it's not particularly poisonous or carcinogenic. A bunch of workers have been exposed to the stuff over the decades, and there's a startling lack of cancer or early death among those people.

Botulin toxin is much more poisonous, by a large factor.

There are a LOT of substances that are more radioactive - you can literally hold a small chunk of plutonium in your hand without too much worry - though you might want to wash your hand afterwards..

Aflatoxin is supposed to be one of the most carcinogenic, and is much, much worse than plutonium.
 
2014-07-03 05:08:57 PM  
Isn't the Hanford Site the place where they cleaned the duct work for the HVAC system and found 30 kilos of plutonium dust or something?
 
2014-07-03 05:10:28 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: He didn't develop superpowers? That's disappointing. I mean, you get hit with a large dose of radiation you kind of expect to develop superpowers.


shiat, his SURVIVING that large a dose of radiation probably counts as a goddamn superpower.
 
2014-07-03 05:14:35 PM  

sp3.yimg.com

The Molecular Man!

 
2014-07-03 05:15:26 PM  

Sin_City_Superhero: He didn't develop superpowers? That's disappointing. I mean, you get hit with a large dose of radiation you kind of expect to develop superpowers.


I think that he lived to 75 was kind of super powerish after all that.  Average life expectancy for an American male male in 1987 (when he died) was only 71.  So maybe he already had super powers but Americium was his slow acting kryptonite
 
gja
2014-07-03 05:15:50 PM  

cirby: factoryconnection:
Plutonium, if I recall correctly, is the most dangerous (toxicity, radioactivity, carcinogenic measure) substance in the world.

Plutonium is nowhere near the top at any of those three. For that matter, it's not particularly poisonous or carcinogenic. A bunch of workers have been exposed to the stuff over the decades, and there's a startling lack of cancer or early death among those people.

Botulin toxin is much more poisonous, by a large factor.

There are a LOT of substances that are more radioactive - you can literally hold a small chunk of plutonium in your hand without too much worry - though you might want to wash your hand afterwards..

Aflatoxin is supposed to be one of the most carcinogenic, and is much, much worse than plutonium.


Polonium-210. Worst.........in........the.........world.
It is so bd it excites the air surrounding it causing a blueish hue glow.
You die. So very fast and so very painfully.
 
2014-07-03 05:17:52 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-07-03 05:19:33 PM  
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-07-03 05:25:04 PM  
api.ning.com

or

www.wired.com

depending on your generation/tastes?
 
2014-07-03 05:30:37 PM  
D) Ukraine.
 
2014-07-03 05:34:12 PM  
www.simpsoncrazy.com
 
2014-07-03 05:34:13 PM  

gja: cirby: factoryconnection:
Plutonium, if I recall correctly, is the most dangerous (toxicity, radioactivity, carcinogenic measure) substance in the world.

Plutonium is nowhere near the top at any of those three. For that matter, it's not particularly poisonous or carcinogenic. A bunch of workers have been exposed to the stuff over the decades, and there's a startling lack of cancer or early death among those people.

Botulin toxin is much more poisonous, by a large factor.

There are a LOT of substances that are more radioactive - you can literally hold a small chunk of plutonium in your hand without too much worry - though you might want to wash your hand afterwards..

Aflatoxin is supposed to be one of the most carcinogenic, and is much, much worse than plutonium.

Polonium-210. Worst.........in........the.........world.
It is so bd it excites the air surrounding it causing a blueish hue glow.
You die. So very fast and so very painfully.


I thought since Po-210 is mostly an alpha emitter that it wasn't very dangerous as long as you didn't absorb or inhale it? Most of its radiation can be stopped with a sheet of paper, and you find the stuff in balances and smoke detectors?
 
gja
2014-07-03 05:40:36 PM  

Campanula: gja: cirby: factoryconnection:
Plutonium, if I recall correctly, is the most dangerous (toxicity, radioactivity, carcinogenic measure) substance in the world.

Plutonium is nowhere near the top at any of those three. For that matter, it's not particularly poisonous or carcinogenic. A bunch of workers have been exposed to the stuff over the decades, and there's a startling lack of cancer or early death among those people.

Botulin toxin is much more poisonous, by a large factor.

There are a LOT of substances that are more radioactive - you can literally hold a small chunk of plutonium in your hand without too much worry - though you might want to wash your hand afterwards..

Aflatoxin is supposed to be one of the most carcinogenic, and is much, much worse than plutonium.

Polonium-210. Worst.........in........the.........world.
It is so bd it excites the air surrounding it causing a blueish hue glow.
You die. So very fast and so very painfully.

I thought since Po-210 is mostly an alpha emitter that it wasn't very dangerous as long as you didn't absorb or inhale it? Most of its radiation can be stopped with a sheet of paper, and you find the stuff in balances and smoke detectors?


Polonium-210 is a low-melting, fairly volatile metal, 50% of which is vaporized in air in 45 hours at 55?C. It's an alpha emitter with a half-life of about 138 days. A milligram emits as many alpha particles as 5 g of radium. The energy released by its decay is so large (140W/g) that a capsule containing about half a gram reaches a temperature above 500C. The capsule also presents a contact gamma-ray dose rate of 0.012 Gy/h. A few curies (1 curie = 3.7 x 1010Bq) of polonium exhibit a blue glow, caused by excitation of the surrounding gas.
 
2014-07-03 05:46:16 PM  
"During the next five months, doctors laboriously extracted tiny bits of glass and razor-sharp pieces of metal embedded in his skin."

Fark me, that sounds like a heaping slice of hell.
 
gja
2014-07-03 05:46:59 PM  

JosephMother: "During the next five months, doctors laboriously extracted tiny bits of glass and razor-sharp pieces of metal embedded in his skin."

Fark me, that sounds like a heaping slice of hell.


Indeed.
 
2014-07-03 05:47:33 PM  
Whistleridge- well put.  I cried like a baby watching top one.  Didn't even feel a thing watching bottom one.
 
2014-07-03 05:51:22 PM  

factoryconnection: The answer is always "The Hanford."

As bad as exploding reactors (Chernobyl), exploding containment buildings (Fukushima) and fuel element failures (TMI) in power reactors are, plutonium is vastly worse.  Plutonium, if I recall correctly, is the most dangerous (toxicity, radioactivity, carcinogenic measure) substance in the world.


you have never tried my wife's cooking
 
2014-07-03 05:53:18 PM  

dbaggins: Don't you sort of sign-on to the chance of "accident that fries me to a glowing hue" when you are handling stuff like this for a living?


Not really. Sure it's an occupational hazard, but the number of people with reportable accidental doses is extraordinarily low.

It's orders of magnitude more common for a roofer to fall off a roof or a driver to get into an accident than it is for a nuke worker to receive a dangerous accidental dose.
 
2014-07-03 05:53:35 PM  

Campanula: I thought since Po-210 is mostly an alpha emitter that it wasn't very dangerous


img.rasset.ie

/i know, i left out "as long as you don't absorb or inhale it"
 
2014-07-03 06:00:36 PM  
Ugh. Poor fellow. Here is another accident that took three lives, though by physical trauma. I heard one story it might not have been an accident, it might have been murder-suicide (one guy sleeping with another guy's wife).


"... causing SL-1 to go prompt critical instantly. In four milliseconds, the heat generated by the resulting enormous power surge caused water surrounding the core to begin to explosively vaporize. The water vapor caused a pressure wave to strike the top of the reactor vessel, causing water and steam to spray from the top of the vessel. This extreme form of water hammer propelled control rods, shield plugs, and the entire reactor vessel upwards. A later investigation concluded that the 26,000-pound (12,000 kg) vessel had jumped 9 feet 1 inch ..."
 
2014-07-03 06:03:03 PM  
Send for this guy

img.fark.net
 
2014-07-03 06:15:14 PM  
They will be wearing abrasion-resistant suits that protect them from surface contamination and chemicals. A dual-purpose air system will provide cool air for breathing and cool air throughout the suit for worker comfort, allowing them to work for longer periods of time. The suits are pressurized, to prevent workers from coming into contact with airborne contaminants.

So goggles aren't enough.
 
2014-07-03 06:17:26 PM  
Stories like this make me damn glad I work on cold-source radiation producing devices (linear accelerators and x-ray tubes to be precise).

When shiat hits the fan in my line of work, the machines turn themselves off... which makes them no longer produce radiation.
 
2014-07-03 06:17:30 PM  
vitrify vitrify vitrify.
 
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