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(Newser)   IBM supercomputer proves you don't need taste buds, a mouth, or a soul to create a barbeque sauce recipe, something Kraft has known for decades   (newser.com) divider line 50
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3169 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Jul 2014 at 3:59 PM (11 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-03 01:35:04 PM
Missouri has been proving this true for generations.
 
2014-07-03 01:48:17 PM
Bengali Butternut BBQ Sauce
Approximate Yield: 550g

300g butternut squash, diced
200g white wine

100g rice vinegar
50g butter, unsalted
5g tamarind concentrate
40g water
10g chili paste (Sriracha)
4g soy sauce
50g dates, pitted and chopped
2g Thai chili
3g mustard seed
3g turmeric, fresh, thinly sliced
0.4g cardamom, ground
5g coriander leaves
2g Meyer lemon zest, grated
5g salt, to taste
10g Meyer lemon juice
6g molasses
1. Gently sweat the squash in the butter over medium low heat until softened, approximately 5-10 minutes.
2. Add the vinegar, tamarind, water, wine, chili paste, and soy; bring to a simmer and reduce heat to low. Add the dates, chili, mustard seed, turmeric, and cardamom. Continue to simmer and reduce to roughly 250g, for about 20 minutes.
3. Remove from heat; add the coriander leaves and lemon zest. Blend to a very smooth consistency and cool.
4. Season the mixture with salt, lemon juice, and molasses. Chill.


That's not BBQ sauce.  That's sauce.  And it sounds very tasty.  I dare Watson to take that and its output on perfect pork, ribs, chicken and brisket to a BBQ competition, and direct a human cook team.  I will lay good money that it doesn't get a call.
 
wee [TotalFark]
2014-07-03 02:27:58 PM
No smoke?  Then it isn't BBQ, sorry.
 
2014-07-03 04:01:25 PM
img2.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-07-03 04:01:39 PM
But can it make a good cup of tea?
 
2014-07-03 04:02:26 PM

skinink: But can it make a good cup of tea?


It can make something almost but not quite entirely unlike tea.
 
2014-07-03 04:07:33 PM

meat0918: skinink: But can it make a good cup of tea?

It can make something almost but not quite entirely unlike tea.


You just have to explain to it the rich history and traditions of tea.
 
2014-07-03 04:07:48 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Bengali Butternut BBQ Sauce
Approximate Yield: 550g
300g butternut squash, diced
200g white wine

100g rice vinegar
50g butter, unsalted
5g tamarind concentrate
40g water
10g chili paste (Sriracha)
4g soy sauce
50g dates, pitted and chopped
2g Thai chili
3g mustard seed
3g turmeric, fresh, thinly sliced
0.4g cardamom, ground
5g coriander leaves
2g Meyer lemon zest, grated
5g salt, to taste
10g Meyer lemon juice
6g molasses
1. Gently sweat the squash in the butter over medium low heat until softened, approximately 5-10 minutes.
2. Add the vinegar, tamarind, water, wine, chili paste, and soy; bring to a simmer and reduce heat to low. Add the dates, chili, mustard seed, turmeric, and cardamom. Continue to simmer and reduce to roughly 250g, for about 20 minutes.
3. Remove from heat; add the coriander leaves and lemon zest. Blend to a very smooth consistency and cool.
4. Season the mixture with salt, lemon juice, and molasses. Chill.

That's not BBQ sauce.  That's sauce.  And it sounds very tasty.  I dare Watson to take that and its output on perfect pork, ribs, chicken and brisket to a BBQ competition, and direct a human cook team.  I will lay good money that it doesn't get a call.


Seriously, WTF is that supposed to be. I'd put it on my chicken tandoori, but farking BARBECUE isn't a farking VERB, you dipshiats. Barbecue sauce has very specific flavors in it, and cardamom, tamarind and Meyer farking lemons are not among them.

Here, let me drop some truth on those bozos.
 
2014-07-03 04:10:14 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: That's not BBQ sauce.

 
2014-07-03 04:11:04 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: Bengali Butternut BBQ Sauce
Approximate Yield: 550g
300g butternut squash, diced
200g white wine

100g rice vinegar
50g butter, unsalted
5g tamarind concentrate
40g water
10g chili paste (Sriracha)
4g soy sauce
50g dates, pitted and chopped
2g Thai chili
3g mustard seed
3g turmeric, fresh, thinly sliced
0.4g cardamom, ground
5g coriander leaves
2g Meyer lemon zest, grated
5g salt, to taste
10g Meyer lemon juice
6g molasses
1. Gently sweat the squash in the butter over medium low heat until softened, approximately 5-10 minutes.
2. Add the vinegar, tamarind, water, wine, chili paste, and soy; bring to a simmer and reduce heat to low. Add the dates, chili, mustard seed, turmeric, and cardamom. Continue to simmer and reduce to roughly 250g, for about 20 minutes.
3. Remove from heat; add the coriander leaves and lemon zest. Blend to a very smooth consistency and cool.
4. Season the mixture with salt, lemon juice, and molasses. Chill.

That's not BBQ sauce.  That's sauce.  And it sounds very tasty.  I dare Watson to take that and its output on perfect pork, ribs, chicken and brisket to a BBQ competition, and direct a human cook team.  I will lay good money that it doesn't get a call.


Why isn't it barbecue sauce?   There's a ton of variety in what constitutes a barbecue sauce.  Some are tomato based, some are mostly vinegar and hot sauce, others have a lot of mustard.  Some are sweet, some are more savory, some are thick, some are thin, it really depends on what style you're going for.

Most have some balance of sweet, heat, and acid, with additional spices for a uniqur taste.  The recipe seems pretty on point with that.

Now, you're right, it may not be a winner in a competition, depending on the style and rules of the competition, but those BBQ competitions seem to be less about making the tastiest food and more about who can make the most perfect example of a 'traditional' preparation within the rules.  For the most part innovation is a hindrance there.
 
2014-07-03 04:11:12 PM
HOW does it taste when I dip MY BALLS IN IT!!!????

/tangy.
 
2014-07-03 04:11:16 PM
Benevolent Misanthrope:
That's not BBQ sauce.  That's sauce.  And it sounds very tasty.  I dare Watson to take that and its output on perfect pork, ribs, chicken and brisket to a BBQ competition, and direct a human cook team.  I will lay good money that it doesn't get a call.

Definitely not BBQ.  Tasty?  Maybe.  Sounds a bit busy and muddled to me but I'd give it a shot if it were sitting in front of me.
 
2014-07-03 04:12:21 PM

Pocket Ninja: Missouri has been proving this true for generations.


Dude.
 
2014-07-03 04:16:03 PM

Pocket Ninja: Missouri has been proving this true for generations.


Don't baste your barbecue...
 
2014-07-03 04:22:48 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Why isn't it barbecue sauce? There's a ton of variety in what constitutes a barbecue sauce. Some are tomato based, some are mostly vinegar and hot sauce, others have a lot of mustard. Some are sweet, some are more savory, some are thick, some are thin, it really depends on what style you're going for.

Most have some balance of sweet, heat, and acid, with additional spices for a uniqur taste. The recipe seems pretty on point with that.

Now, you're right, it may not be a winner in a competition, depending on the style and rules of the competition, but those BBQ competitions seem to be less about making the tastiest food and more about who can make the most perfect example of a 'traditional' preparation within the rules. For the most part innovation is a hindrance there.


If you put Alfredo on smoked pork, is it BBQ sauce?
 
2014-07-03 04:24:11 PM

TuteTibiImperes: BBQ competitions seem to be less about making the tastiest food and more about who can make the most perfect example of a 'traditional' preparation within the rules.  For the most part innovation is a hindrance there.


You sound like one of those people that put beer and chocolate chips and cumin in chili.

edgy, man.
 
2014-07-03 04:24:58 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: That's not BBQ sauce.  That's sauce.  And it sounds very tasty.  I dare Watson to take that and its output on perfect pork, ribs, chicken and brisket to a BBQ competition, and direct a human cook team.  I will lay good money that it doesn't get a call.


Vinegar, molasses, spices. Looks like BBQ sauce to me. More Georgia style than Missouri, but still a BBQ sauce.
 
2014-07-03 04:25:18 PM
Okay. I'll admit it.

I dig me some KC Bastardpiece. But only on chicken.
 
2014-07-03 04:25:37 PM
That's not BBQ sauce. Should've used the Z1 DB2 system.
 
2014-07-03 04:29:14 PM
Oh. look. It's This Thread.  again.

scroll for it.
 
2014-07-03 04:32:59 PM

Benevolent Misanthrope: TuteTibiImperes: Why isn't it barbecue sauce? There's a ton of variety in what constitutes a barbecue sauce. Some are tomato based, some are mostly vinegar and hot sauce, others have a lot of mustard. Some are sweet, some are more savory, some are thick, some are thin, it really depends on what style you're going for.

Most have some balance of sweet, heat, and acid, with additional spices for a uniqur taste. The recipe seems pretty on point with that.

Now, you're right, it may not be a winner in a competition, depending on the style and rules of the competition, but those BBQ competitions seem to be less about making the tastiest food and more about who can make the most perfect example of a 'traditional' preparation within the rules. For the most part innovation is a hindrance there.

If you put Alfredo on smoked pork, is it BBQ sauce?


Alfredo sauce is already Alfredo sauce.  I don't think I've ever seen a cheese-based barbecue sauce.

The Watson recipe isn't really that far in left field.  Molasses and Tamarind are already used in many barbecue sauces, as are vinegar, hot sauces, and mustard.  The lemon juice is just more acid, and there's precedent for citrus from Mojo Criollo, which is a type of barbecue sauce.  The dates are just more sugar, plus a little bit of vegetable matter, they can stand in for tomato paste or ketchup in the recipe.

Apart from that you have a little turmeric and coriander, which while not strictly traditional, aren't that weird either.
It's closer to a barbeque sauce than it is anything else.
 
2014-07-03 04:36:56 PM

TuteTibiImperes: Apart from that you have a little turmeric and coriander, which while not strictly traditional, aren't that weird either.
It's closer to a barbeque sauce than it is anything else.


Closer than those mustard-based "barbecue sauce" affronts to God are, at any rate.
 
2014-07-03 04:40:26 PM

ArcadianRefugee: TuteTibiImperes: Apart from that you have a little turmeric and coriander, which while not strictly traditional, aren't that weird either.
It's closer to a barbeque sauce than it is anything else.

Closer than those mustard-based "barbecue sauce" affronts to God are, at any rate.


What about white bbq sauce
 
2014-07-03 04:46:37 PM

meat0918: ArcadianRefugee: TuteTibiImperes: Apart from that you have a little turmeric and coriander, which while not strictly traditional, aren't that weird either.
It's closer to a barbeque sauce than it is anything else.

Closer than those mustard-based "barbecue sauce" affronts to God are, at any rate.

What about white bbq sauce


That doesn't really count; they put it only on chicken.
 
2014-07-03 04:46:39 PM

meat0918: ArcadianRefugee: TuteTibiImperes: Apart from that you have a little turmeric and coriander, which while not strictly traditional, aren't that weird either.
It's closer to a barbeque sauce than it is anything else.

Closer than those mustard-based "barbecue sauce" affronts to God are, at any rate.

What about white bbq sauce


That's an Alabama thing.  There's a reason it hasn't spread out from there.
 
2014-07-03 04:51:12 PM

TuteTibiImperes: meat0918: ArcadianRefugee: TuteTibiImperes: Apart from that you have a little turmeric and coriander, which while not strictly traditional, aren't that weird either.
It's closer to a barbeque sauce than it is anything else.

Closer than those mustard-based "barbecue sauce" affronts to God are, at any rate.

What about white bbq sauce

That's an Alabama thing.  There's a reason it hasn't spread out from there.


On that, we can agree.
 
2014-07-03 04:51:47 PM

meat0918: ArcadianRefugee: TuteTibiImperes: Apart from that you have a little turmeric and coriander, which while not strictly traditional, aren't that weird either.
It's closer to a barbeque sauce than it is anything else.

Closer than those mustard-based "barbecue sauce" affronts to God are, at any rate.

What about white bbq sauce


Thats some fancy mayonnaise, but it ain't bbq sauce.
 
2014-07-03 04:58:51 PM

LazyMedia: Benevolent Misanthrope: Bengali Butternut BBQ Sauce
...

 but farking BARBECUE isn't a farking VERB, you dipshiats...


It definitely is in Australia. We barbecue food all the time.
 
2014-07-03 04:59:26 PM
That sounds good, but not mixed with smoky pulled pork, or on a beef brisket.
 
2014-07-03 05:05:50 PM
I'm making a batch as soon as I get my hands on a butternut squash.

All that, and Watson is bad at basic arithmetic.  Approximate yield: 550 g. Which somehow happens after reducing everything to 250 g and then adding another 28 g of ingredients. Or am I missing something?
 
2014-07-03 05:08:14 PM

Pocket Ninja: Missouri has been proving this true for generations.


persephonemagazine.com
 
2014-07-03 05:14:09 PM
WTF is BBQ sauce?Spiced up ketchup that you top dry meat with? If the meat tastes like shiat it's probably shiat and "sauce" and ain't gonna help, y'all.
 
2014-07-03 05:33:53 PM

uber humper: WTF is BBQ sauce?Spiced up ketchup that you top dry meat with? If the meat tastes like shiat it's probably shiat and "sauce" and ain't gonna help, y'all.




Since civilization has not yet reached you yet I will explain. Yes, good BBQ is good without BBQ sauce but just as chicken fried steak is supposed to be served with gravy and a PB&J is supposed to be served with the J. BBQ sauce is part of eating BBQ. (along with bread or crackers, pickles and onions) You don't eat a hot dog plain do you notmatter how good the hot dog is by itself?

Key point is that no matter how good the sauce is it does not make bad BBQ better while good BBQ can overcome a poor sauce. The inverse is true of a chicken fired steak where the quality of the gravy is of utmost importance followed by the batter used for the steak.
 
2014-07-03 05:46:28 PM
Tank: Here you go, buddy; "Breakfast of Champions."
Mouse: If you close your eyes, it almost feels like you're eating runny eggs.
Apoc: Yeah, or a bowl of snot.
Mouse: Do you know what it really reminds me of? Tasty Wheat. Did you ever eat Tasty Wheat?
Switch: No, but technically, neither did you.
Mouse: That's exactly my point. Exactly. Because you have to wonder: how do the machines know what Tasty Wheat tasted like? Maybe they got it wrong. Maybe what I think Tasty Wheat tasted like actually tasted like oatmeal, or tuna fish. That makes you wonder about a lot of things. You take chicken, for example: maybe they couldn't figure out what to make chicken taste like, which is why chicken tastes like everything.
 
2014-07-03 06:05:07 PM

Aussie_As: LazyMedia: Benevolent Misanthrope: Bengali Butternut BBQ Sauce
...

 but farking BARBECUE isn't a farking VERB, you dipshiats...

It definitely is in Australia. We barbecue food all the time.


One of the many, many things that Australians are wrong about. You're grilling that food, mate. Also, Vegemite is disgusting, the steering wheel goes on the left, and Christ, Tony Abbot? Really?
 
2014-07-03 06:05:12 PM
"You don't need taste buds, you say?  Brilliant!"

www.productwiki.com
 
2014-07-03 06:06:53 PM

uber humper: WTF is BBQ sauce?Spiced up ketchup that you top dry meat with? If the meat tastes like shiat it's probably shiat and "sauce" and ain't gonna help, y'all.


Shut up, Texan. If we want your opinion, we'll have a president ride in an open car through one of your "cities."
 
2014-07-03 06:16:54 PM
there is no rage like BBQ rage

/pair that with a beer and you can probably start a small war
 
2014-07-03 06:21:47 PM
The best BBQ is dry-rub pork ribs, and you know I understand BBQ because I'm from New York, where everything is good.

/there, that should chum the waters a bit.
 
2014-07-03 06:33:35 PM

hasty ambush: uber humper: WTF is BBQ sauce?Spiced up ketchup that you top dry meat with? If the meat tastes like shiat it's probably shiat and "sauce" and ain't gonna help, y'all.

Since civilization has not yet reached you yet I will explain. Yes, good BBQ is good without BBQ sauce but just as chicken fried steak is supposed to be served with gravy and a PB&J is supposed to be served with the J. BBQ sauce is part of eating BBQ. (along with bread or crackers, pickles and onions) You don't eat a hot dog plain do you notmatter how good the hot dog is by itself?

Key point is that no matter how good the sauce is it does not make bad BBQ better while good BBQ can overcome a poor sauce. The inverse is true of a chicken fired steak where the quality of the gravy is of utmost importance followed by the batter used for the steak.


The goal of the sauce is to complement the meat and smoke. All BBQ does not need sauce, but that does not mean sauce isn't awesome and can be used without shame. A great BBQ joint has a sauce that matches their meat.
 
2014-07-03 06:35:47 PM

AlgaeRancher: there is no rage like BBQ rage

/pair that with a beer and you can probably start a small war


You forgot about chili and that stuff with beans in it. that some call chili. NY pizza  vs Chicago dough pie.  and Toppings/condiments on hot dogs.
 
2014-07-03 07:01:44 PM

CruJones: hasty ambush: uber humper: WTF is BBQ sauce?Spiced up ketchup that you top dry meat with? If the meat tastes like shiat it's probably shiat and "sauce" and ain't gonna help, y'all.

Since civilization has not yet reached you yet I will explain. Yes, good BBQ is good without BBQ sauce but just as chicken fried steak is supposed to be served with gravy and a PB&J is supposed to be served with the J. BBQ sauce is part of eating BBQ. (along with bread or crackers, pickles and onions) You don't eat a hot dog plain do you notmatter how good the hot dog is by itself?

Key point is that no matter how good the sauce is it does not make bad BBQ better while good BBQ can overcome a poor sauce. The inverse is true of a chicken fired steak where the quality of the gravy is of utmost importance followed by the batter used for the steak.

The goal of the sauce is to complement the meat and smoke. All BBQ does not need sauce, but that does not mean sauce isn't awesome and can be used without shame. A great BBQ joint has a sauce that matches their meat.


Agreed.  I like the "wet" BBQ over "dry".  Not that I can't appreciate the meat on its own, but it just works for me.  Its not like slathering A1 all over your steak... BBQ sauce, when done right, complements the meat.
 
2014-07-03 07:06:50 PM

wee: No smoke?  Then it isn't BBQ, sorry.


You smoke the meat. Shortly before you're ready to serve it, you brush some sauce on, and let it carmelize a tad on the grill. Then you serve it.
 
2014-07-03 08:11:08 PM
Without BBQ sauce what do you soften up the burnt ends in?
 
2014-07-03 09:02:54 PM
downstairs:

Agreed.  I like the "wet" BBQ over "dry".  Not that I can't appreciate the meat on its own, but it just works for me.  Its not like slathering A1 all over your steak... BBQ sauce, when done right, complements the meat.

I don't understand why so many people complain about what others prefer, my tastes constantly annoyed my gf who would occasionally make me a salad and have no dressing whatsoever to put on it.  I like sauces, almost to the point that I choose the food underneath by what I'm going to smother it in.  I'll put tartar and vinegar on the same piece of fish, dip a well-sauced wing into bleu cheese or ranch...  I love A1, sriracha, hot sauces, BBQ sauces, ketchup, catsup and most mustards.  I can always still taste the underlying food, and the texture tells me the quality of the ingredients and preparation.  I'm not saying a steak needs to be covered in A1, just that A1 is best with something under it.
 
2014-07-03 10:01:47 PM

saintstryfe: The best BBQ is dry-rub pork ribs, and you know I understand BBQ because I'm from New York, where everything is good.

/there, that should chum the waters a bit.


You jest, but the best pork ribs I ever ate were in the East Village. The only downside to the barbecue you can get in NYC is that it's really expensive compared to in its natural habitat.

/Oh, and Hill Brothers. Their layout is retarded. Just take my order and bring me my food.
 
2014-07-03 10:40:26 PM
Kraft letters rearranged spells Farkt.

/sayin'.
 
2014-07-03 10:42:07 PM
I love Sweet Baby Rays for a decade.
 
2014-07-04 12:01:01 AM

artemusprine: downstairs:

Agreed.  I like the "wet" BBQ over "dry".  Not that I can't appreciate the meat on its own, but it just works for me.  Its not like slathering A1 all over your steak... BBQ sauce, when done right, complements the meat.

I don't understand why so many people complain about what others prefer, my tastes constantly annoyed my gf who would occasionally make me a salad and have no dressing whatsoever to put on it.  I like sauces, almost to the point that I choose the food underneath by what I'm going to smother it in.  I'll put tartar and vinegar on the same piece of fish, dip a well-sauced wing into bleu cheese or ranch...  I love A1, HP, sriracha, hot sauces, BBQ sauces, ketchup, catsup and most mustards.  I can always still taste the underlying food, and the texture tells me the quality of the ingredients and preparation.  I'm not saying a steak needs to be covered in A1 HP just that A1 HP is best with something under it everything.


I agree, 'cept for the A1 bit. You're to be admired for your world view, it just needs HP sauce added to it. So I had to FTFY.
 
2014-07-04 03:31:57 AM
Farxist Marxist:

I agree, 'cept for the A1 bit. You're to be admired for your world view, it just needs HP sauce added to it. So I had to FTFY.

Oh, don't think I don't know this.  I've priced it online, but having not actually tasted it wasn't sure if it was worth the cost.  And didn't you recently cut the salt or something out of it?  I reckoned the genuine article was just something I would never have the pleasure of experiencing.  Will admit I have long been HP-curious.
 
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