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(Medium)   New class of stars are totally metal--go all the way to 11   (medium.com) divider line 42
    More: Cool, star formation, galaxy formation, crystallisation, fluid flows, eddies, metals  
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2893 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Jul 2014 at 2:19 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-03 11:48:36 AM  
I found one! Hmm, seems to have been hit by some sort of comet...

s.hswstatic.com

Odd, I seem to be sucked into its gravity field... this seems like some sort of trap to me...
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-07-03 11:51:11 AM  
Wouldn't they look like white dwarfs? Maybe we already found them.
 
2014-07-03 02:34:13 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-07-03 02:44:42 PM  
ZAZ:
Wouldn't they look like white dwarfs? Maybe we already found them.

No, their spectrum would we pretty far out there. Even a small amount of metal in a star shows up when you look at it with a spectroscope.

I have a feeling these metal stars - if they really exist - are going to be really, really dim, and hard to see at even short distances.
 
2014-07-03 02:45:50 PM  

ZAZ: Wouldn't they look like white dwarfs? Maybe we already found them.


How about these dwarfs?
russdwarf.com
 
2014-07-03 02:50:01 PM  
Either way, this work will send astronomers scurrying for their lens clothes and telescopes.

?
 
2014-07-03 02:50:21 PM  

cirby: ZAZ:
Wouldn't they look like white dwarfs? Maybe we already found them.

No, their spectrum would we pretty far out there. Even a small amount of metal in a star shows up when you look at it with a spectroscope.

I have a feeling these metal stars - if they really exist - are going to be really, really dim, and hard to see at even short distances.


I'm not sure you could even call it a star. If it's made entirely of lithium or carbon at the lightest, it's going to have to be giganormous to induce fusion at the core, and if it's made from even heavier elements fusion might not happen at all. If there's no fusion, I'd be hesitant to call it a star in the first place.

It seems to me that the solar wind from its hydrogen-rich siblings in the same stellar nursery would probably disrupt the formation of such a "stillborn star."
 
2014-07-03 03:04:26 PM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: cirby: ZAZ:
Wouldn't they look like white dwarfs? Maybe we already found them.

No, their spectrum would we pretty far out there. Even a small amount of metal in a star shows up when you look at it with a spectroscope.

I have a feeling these metal stars - if they really exist - are going to be really, really dim, and hard to see at even short distances.

I'm not sure you could even call it a star. If it's made entirely of lithium or carbon at the lightest, it's going to have to be giganormous to induce fusion at the core, and if it's made from even heavier elements fusion might not happen at all. If there's no fusion, I'd be hesitant to call it a star in the first place.

It seems to me that the solar wind from its hydrogen-rich siblings in the same stellar nursery would probably disrupt the formation of such a "stillborn star."


Perhaps they exist as cold remnants at the edges of solar systems.
 
2014-07-03 03:29:34 PM  
My guess is that they'd be red dwarfs or dimmer. Perhaps they go on to become the solid cores of gas giant planets in a solar system?
 
2014-07-03 03:42:51 PM  

jfarkinB: Either way, this work will send astronomers scurrying for their lens clothes and telescopes.

?


rlv.zcache.com
What lens clothes might look like.
 
2014-07-03 03:54:19 PM  
This is not nearly as interesting as it seems. When astronomers say "metal" they actually mean "any element except hydrogen or helium"

Frankly, I wish Fark could stop linking to medium.com -- it's "science" stories are actually beginning to make me nostalgic for io9...
 
2014-07-03 03:56:41 PM  

ZAZ: Wouldn't they look like white dwarfs? Maybe we already found them.


img1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2014-07-03 03:58:03 PM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: cirby: ZAZ:
Wouldn't they look like white dwarfs? Maybe we already found them.

No, their spectrum would we pretty far out there. Even a small amount of metal in a star shows up when you look at it with a spectroscope.

I have a feeling these metal stars - if they really exist - are going to be really, really dim, and hard to see at even short distances.

I'm not sure you could even call it a star. If it's made entirely of lithium or carbon at the lightest, it's going to have to be giganormous to induce fusion at the core, and if it's made from even heavier elements fusion might not happen at all. If there's no fusion, I'd be hesitant to call it a star in the first place.

It seems to me that the solar wind from its hydrogen-rich siblings in the same stellar nursery would probably disrupt the formation of such a "stillborn star."


of course they are huge, where do you think we'll get the metal for the Dyson Sphere?
 
2014-07-03 04:52:13 PM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: cirby: ZAZ:
Wouldn't they look like white dwarfs? Maybe we already found them.

No, their spectrum would we pretty far out there. Even a small amount of metal in a star shows up when you look at it with a spectroscope.

I have a feeling these metal stars - if they really exist - are going to be really, really dim, and hard to see at even short distances.

I'm not sure you could even call it a star. If it's made entirely of lithium or carbon at the lightest, it's going to have to be giganormous to induce fusion at the core, and if it's made from even heavier elements fusion might not happen at all. If there's no fusion, I'd be hesitant to call it a star in the first place.

It seems to me that the solar wind from its hydrogen-rich siblings in the same stellar nursery would probably disrupt the formation of such a "stillborn star."


To add to that, a star that is hot enough to ignite core fusion of heavy elements also has a huge radius and is very bright. Giant stars are the only known objects in the universe that fuse metals. If these objects existed as stars, we'd have found them by now. If these objects do exist at all, you just can't call them stars.
 
2014-07-03 04:58:45 PM  
They're called planets. Really freaking huge planets if you're expecting nucular fusion to happen.
 
2014-07-03 05:00:48 PM  
What dwarf metal stars might look like:

www.skierpage.com
 
2014-07-03 05:06:28 PM  
varnigus:
To add to that, a star that is hot enough to ignite core fusion of heavy elements also has a huge radius and is very bright. Giant stars are the only known objects in the universe that fuse metals. If these objects existed as stars, we'd have found them by now. If these objects do exist at all, you just can't call them stars.

...or maybe they exploded not long after being formed - or collapsed into other things.
 
2014-07-03 05:51:01 PM  

cirby: varnigus:
To add to that, a star that is hot enough to ignite core fusion of heavy elements also has a huge radius and is very bright. Giant stars are the only known objects in the universe that fuse metals. If these objects existed as stars, we'd have found them by now. If these objects do exist at all, you just can't call them stars.

...or maybe they exploded not long after being formed - or collapsed into other things.


True, stars in this range tend to be quite short-lived. With that mass, they should supernova, but with that metallicity, they should go neutron star and the supernova may be weaker than expected due to the incredibly heavy envelope. If these exist as stars, the trick to discovering them may be to look at data from supernovae rather than at stars themselves. It would certainly be very weird to find a star that is born off the main sequence of the H-R diagram.
 
2014-07-03 06:35:44 PM  

czetie: This is not nearly as interesting as it seems. When astronomers say "metal" they actually mean "any element except hydrogen or helium"

Frankly, I wish Fark could stop linking to medium.com -- it's "science" stories are actually beginning to make me nostalgic for io9...


http://io9.com/a-new-class-of-stars-is-made-entirely-of-metal-159982 14 16
 
2014-07-03 06:37:54 PM  
In theory, somewhere out there is a planet of solid gold.
 
2014-07-03 06:54:17 PM  

Heraclitus: In theory, somewhere out there is a planet of solid gold.


Gold-Pressed Latinum?
 
2014-07-03 06:59:54 PM  
rotating vertices.

I hope that's a bad autocorrect for vortices because otherwise I'm confused.

The reason why things like this (and this) go unexplained so long is what's called Emergent Behavior .

At lower levels of complexity you can have all the underlying math sitting in front of you and everything is understood. But after a certain point the complexity piles up so much that the higher level stuff doesn't just follow easily from the lower level stuff. 1 + 1 = 2 but eventually 100 + 100 = a hell of a lot more than 200.
 The stupidest way is to spend huge money on supercomputers and throw dumb computer power at the problem until the truth (hopefully) jumps out at you somehow. This is the DOD way. This is the PHB way.


The more interesting answer is to let human curiosity and noodling around solve the problem. It's harder to predict how long things will take, or how much money will be involved, but has a better chance of working. And solves a vastly larger number of problems. After all it's what made the computers in the first place.
 
2014-07-03 07:06:39 PM  

czetie: When astronomers say "metal" they actually mean "any element except hydrogen or helium"


The article says > H/He/Lithium. But [[Metallicity]] agrees with you.
 
2014-07-03 07:39:07 PM  
They're STAAAAAAAAAAAAAARS

They're STAAAAAAAAAAAAA-aaaaaaaars!!!
 
2014-07-03 07:48:14 PM  
Fark needs a dedicated astronomy tab.
 
2014-07-03 08:51:55 PM  
There is a fleet massing at Sullust.
 
2014-07-03 08:52:08 PM  
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-07-03 08:58:40 PM  
I can't get any reading on that shield.
 
2014-07-03 09:10:41 PM  

cirby: ZAZ:
Wouldn't they look like white dwarfs? Maybe we already found them.

No, their spectrum would we pretty far out there. Even a small amount of metal in a star shows up when you look at it with a spectroscope.

I have a feeling these metal stars - if they really exist - are going to be really, really dim, and hard to see at even short distances.


My inner armchair physicist can believe that. Heavier elements take more energy to fuse and their bandgaps are usually larger so fewer photons would be coming out of it.
 
Al!
2014-07-03 09:13:27 PM  

Fark like a Barsoomian: czetie: When astronomers say "metal" they actually mean "any element except hydrogen or helium"

The article says > H/He/Lithium. But [[Metallicity]] agrees with you.


The article is wrong, your link and czetie are right.
 
2014-07-03 09:13:53 PM  
Hoth is melting.
 
2014-07-03 10:42:47 PM  
These "stars" would never initiate fusion and gravity would have no balancing force as in a star. These things would go from planet / neutron star / black hole depending on the amount of material available.
 
2014-07-03 10:55:09 PM  
Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy:

It seems to me that the solar wind from its hydrogen-rich siblings in the same stellar nursery would probably disrupt the formation of such a "stillborn star."

You're just writing off these heavenly bodies to die. Fusion begins at mass accumulation! I'm pro-star life.
 
2014-07-04 12:47:03 AM  

BalugaJoe: pppffffrrrttttttttttt


That's all you got? Non sequitur one liners out the wrong end?

Come on, I dare you to post something that's longer than a f#$@ing sentence fragment.
 
2014-07-04 02:14:11 AM  
Danzig class stars
 
2014-07-04 02:24:38 AM  
The first such star will be named Load. The next will be named Reload.
 
ecl
2014-07-04 02:59:17 AM  
I AM the metal star.
 
2014-07-04 04:02:31 AM  

RedVentrue: The first such star will be named Load Lode. The next will be named Re  load lode.


The third will be Motherlode
 
2014-07-04 05:58:44 AM  
Since there are now metallic stars and apparently (from something i heard over the radio a few weeks ago) white dwarf stars that are just one big diamond, when are we gonna start construction on solar-system scale jewelry?
 
2014-07-04 08:26:43 AM  

TDBoedy: RedVentrue: The first such star will be named Load Lode. The next will be named Re  load lode.

The third will be Motherlode


The fourth downlode
 
2014-07-04 10:39:37 AM  

cirby: No, their spectrum would we pretty far out there. Even a small amount of metal in a star shows up when you look at it with a spectroscope.

I have a feeling these metal stars - if they really exist - are going to be really, really dim, and hard to see at even short distances.


I would think they would have to be white dwarfs--and pretty dim at that.  If it's made of entirely metal there is basically no fusion.  It would have to get awfully hot to fuse metals at all.  Such a star would also have very little reserve, it wouldn't last.  My memory is that such a star would be above the black hole limit, it would very soon be crushed out of existence.
 
2014-07-04 09:05:27 PM  

Heraclitus: In theory, somewhere out there is a planet of solid gold.


Or money.
 
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