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(CityLab)   Screw going to Mars. We should be shipping out to Venus. It's Mediterranean temperatures and sea-level barometric pressure plus breathable air provided you stay 30 miles above the ground   (citylab.com) divider line 27
    More: Cool  
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2654 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Jul 2014 at 6:07 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-07-02 03:33:45 PM  
...and still we stand tall.
 
2014-07-02 03:39:51 PM  
Permanent settlers could tether these floating blobs together, extending walkways and building platforms, creating something that might eventually look like a massive floating oil rig, complete with tubes dangling dozens of miles below to gather materials from the surface.

And we can call it "Columbia"....
 
2014-07-02 03:41:53 PM  
It's?

Forget it... subby's rolling.
 
2014-07-02 04:36:35 PM  
Oh! I get it now! The Jetsons, with those freaky tall stilt-buildings, was actually set on Venus!
 
2014-07-02 05:34:27 PM  
kesseljunkie.files.wordpress.com

"... and over here we set up the billiard room and wet bar...."
 
2014-07-02 05:36:13 PM  
 
2014-07-02 06:25:48 PM  
Sure, if you can afford grey ash.
 
2014-07-02 06:27:16 PM  
Well, It would be fun to execute your enemies by throwing them to their burning / crushing deaths. On the other hand, some meddling do-gooder would eventually pop your bubble and send your entire evil lair to the same fate. So... Equip your swivel chair with an escape pod, and it should all work out.
 
2014-07-02 06:28:07 PM  

DammitIForgotMyLogin: Venus, you say?


By now doesn't everyone recognize that video from its YT identifier?

 
2014-07-02 06:43:12 PM  

Ashyukun: Permanent settlers could tether these floating blobs together, extending walkways and building platforms, creating something that might eventually look like a massive floating oil rig, complete with tubes dangling dozens of miles below to gather materials from the surface.

And we can call it "Columbia"....


They could have warned me who she was before we...
 
2014-07-02 06:45:49 PM  
Subby: breathable air

Um, no. Go back and read the article again, Venus' atmosphere is not breathable. In fact, it's better than 95% carbon dioxide, with just a bit of nitrogen and assorted nasties like sulfur dioxide - not what you want to put in your lungs. The pressure and temperature are earthlike, indeed, and the idea in the article is good, but seriously, read it a bit more carefully next time.
 
2014-07-02 06:50:45 PM  
Watch out for the Troglytes.
 
2014-07-02 06:57:22 PM  

MuonNeutrino: Subby: breathable air

Um, no. Go back and read the article again, Venus' atmosphere is not breathable. In fact, it's better than 95% carbon dioxide, with just a bit of nitrogen and assorted nasties like sulfur dioxide - not what you want to put in your lungs. The pressure and temperature are earthlike, indeed, and the idea in the article is good, but seriously, read it a bit more carefully next time.


not to mention the beyond hurricane force winds at the altitudes where these blobs would float, the very CHAOTIC winds.

yeah, there's no way a blimp, which lacks any significant means to stabilize itself, is going to stay up or steady in that environment.
 
2014-07-02 07:17:11 PM  
I will date the girl from Venus FOR SCIENCE!
 
2014-07-02 08:18:20 PM  

buttery_shame_cave: MuonNeutrino: Subby: breathable air

Um, no. Go back and read the article again, Venus' atmosphere is not breathable. In fact, it's better than 95% carbon dioxide, with just a bit of nitrogen and assorted nasties like sulfur dioxide - not what you want to put in your lungs. The pressure and temperature are earthlike, indeed, and the idea in the article is good, but seriously, read it a bit more carefully next time.

not to mention the beyond hurricane force winds at the altitudes where these blobs would float, the very CHAOTIC winds.

yeah, there's no way a blimp, which lacks any significant means to stabilize itself, is going to stay up or steady in that environment.


Which is why they're suggesting something a mite more sophisticated (and larger) than a mere blimp.
 
2014-07-02 09:08:29 PM  
These space threads just aren't the same anymore.

Who knew the victory bell would ring so hollow...
 
2014-07-02 10:05:27 PM  
What about radiation? Venus doesn't have a magnetosphere from what I remember.
 
2014-07-02 10:17:52 PM  

Fano: I will date the girl from Venus FOR SCIENCE!


He's so brave, he's so brave, he'll be her love slave forever.
 
2014-07-03 01:55:13 AM  
Man, between the ursadders, acid frogs, and lowlander scum, I can't understand why anyone would want to live on Venus.
 
2014-07-03 04:46:56 AM  
We'll get right on it when we develop anti-grav generators that can lift an entire city up indefinitely, sorta like this (which has also been previously pointed out in the thread):

strangetelemetry.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-07-03 08:05:42 AM  

Smoking GNU: We'll get right on it when we develop anti-grav generators that can lift an entire city up indefinitely, sorta like this (which has also been previously pointed out in the thread):


You ain't that smart, are you?
 
2014-07-03 09:21:23 AM  

mr lawson: Smoking GNU: We'll get right on it when we develop anti-grav generators that can lift an entire city up indefinitely, sorta like this (which has also been previously pointed out in the thread):

You ain't that smart, are you?


What does Archimedes have to do with anti-gravity? Smoking GNU knows that the city can't float on it's own without help in the air. It's not sitting on fluid.

What's your point?
 
2014-07-03 10:07:21 AM  

mainstreet62: the city can't float on it's own without help in the air.


Nothing can float in air.
 
2014-07-03 10:17:17 AM  

mainstreet62: What does Archimedes have to do with anti-gravity? Smoking GNU knows that the city can't float on it's own without help in the air. It's not sitting on fluid.

What's your point?


i22.photobucket.com
 
2014-07-03 10:50:29 AM  

doglover: mainstreet62: the city can't float on it's own without help in the air.

Nothing can float in air.


img.fark.net
 
2014-07-03 03:22:35 PM  

doglover: mainstreet62: the city can't float on it's own without help in the air.

Nothing can float in air.


Did you guys ever do the Archimedes Diver experiment/demonstration in your science class as a kid? You take a pen cap, cover one end with sticky tack or something, and drop it in a clear 2 liter filled with water. When you squeeze the 2 liter, the pen cap goes down, and when you release it, it goes up, thus demonstrating the idea of Archimedes' Principle. And if you did it just right, you could make the little pen cap diver guy stay right in the middle of the 2 liter, not moving up or down.

Now, imagine that instead of the pen cap, you have these habitat modules they're talking about, and instead of a 2 liter of water, you have the Venusian atmosphere. At some point, the gasses inside the habitat will counterbalance the pressure of the outside atmosphere, thus reaching equilibrium. Now, because the Venusian atmosphere is incredibly dense, a whole lot denser than Earth's atmosphere, 1 AU happens to hit about 30 miles up from the surface of Venus. Coincidentally, the temperature in the atmosphere at that level is more or less Earth-normal, as well. So, 30 miles up from Venus, we've got Earth-standard atmospheric pressure and Earth-standard temperature. Therefore, if we drop a bubble of Earth-standard atmosphere at Earth-standard temp into the Venusian atmosphere, it ought to sink down to that level and no further. That's the general idea, anyway, there's lots more science involved than that.
 
2014-07-03 09:03:55 PM  

buttery_shame_cave: not to mention the beyond hurricane force winds at the altitudes where these blobs would float, the very CHAOTIC winds.
yeah, there's no way a blimp, which lacks any significant means to stabilize itself, is going to stay up or steady in that environment.


I think I've heard it described as the habitat would actually just drift with the winds, which gives you the added benefit of a vaguely 24-hour night-day schedule, since they blow so fast, instead of 223 days as is Venus' planetary day.
 
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