If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Medium)   What does alien life look like? Real science always fires my imagination more than any fiction   (medium.com) divider line 85
    More: Interesting, Interstellar Medium, planetary nebulas, aliens, aromatic hydrocarbons, initial condition, microorganisms, supernova remnants, scientific fields  
•       •       •

5335 clicks; posted to Geek » on 02 Jul 2014 at 2:34 AM (3 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



85 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2014-07-01 11:48:32 PM
good old ethane.
 
2014-07-02 12:04:03 AM
Well?  Where the fark is everybody then?
 
2014-07-02 12:43:47 AM

unyon: Well?  Where the fark is everybody then?


Watching. Waiting. Seeing if the real estate here is going to go down in value in another few thousand years, or if we're going to get our heads out of our asses and produce something of value to trade for...
 
2014-07-02 01:23:07 AM
If you take the infinitely small probability of intelligent life evolving, and multiply it by the infinitely large number of potential planets, you get...well..who knows.

Personally, I think it has no doubt happened somewhere, but that somewhere may be way too far away to every communicate with Earth.
 
2014-07-02 02:48:38 AM

unyon: Well?  Where the fark is everybody then?


Virtual reality and teledildonics drove them to extinction by making old fashioned in-the-flesh sex unfashionable.
 
2014-07-02 02:50:14 AM
One of those strange looking galaxies could very well be alien life.
media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com
 
2014-07-02 02:53:06 AM
I tried smurfing for alien women pictures and then I smurfed this.

www.blogcdn.com

My brain is smurfed.  Smurfed like it's never been smurfed before.  I'm going to go smurf myself.  Goodbye unsmurfy world!
 
2014-07-02 02:58:07 AM
Only one species on this planet has evolved in a direction to be able to leave it. If there are planets ruled by dolphins or cockroaches, they certainly aren't going to build a spaceship and visit us.
 
2014-07-02 03:02:12 AM
img.fark.net

Jesus - go bald with some dignity, dude.
 
2014-07-02 03:02:35 AM
We do not know how hard/rare the creation of an initial replicator capable of change is.

If it is very hard/rare then life will be rare.
If it is easy/common then life in countless complex forms will be everywhere.

Once it starts complexity is going to happen. Natural selection is the inevitable result of a replicator. Be told.
 
2014-07-02 03:04:15 AM

unyon: Well?  Where the fark is everybody then?


They hibernate for 30 million years to conserve energy. When they awake they hunt rare galactic life forms on over populated planets. Conservation they call it.
 
2014-07-02 03:09:17 AM
Honestly if another planet that is similar to ours exists somewhere with intelligent life, I'm guessing they would end up looking a lot like us if not exactly like us.
 
2014-07-02 03:28:58 AM
Subby's lame. Hypothesizing about alien life is not real science, and may as well be science fiction for all that it currently matters.
 
2014-07-02 03:29:59 AM
www.treknews.net
like this?
 
2014-07-02 03:34:13 AM
Everyone knows that real aliens will look very humanoid with just a few jutting ridges on their heads, or possibly a shade of color that we ourselves do not have, such as say, green. Other than that, there will be very little to distinguish us and them. We'll even be able to breed with these beings to create half breed children. Duh.
 
2014-07-02 03:53:27 AM

delciotto: Honestly if another planet that is similar to ours exists somewhere with intelligent life, I'm guessing they would end up looking a lot like us if not exactly like us.


Why would they end up looking a lot like us? That's a pretty big presumption.

They need a body plan that can support a big, energy intensive brain. They need a limb plan with a high degree of ability to use tools.

We might be able to say they have a similar chemistry to earth like fauna if the planet is similar to earth. We might be able to shoot in the dark and say they might be bilaterally symmetrical.

I'm not sure how any of that points to them logically having to look similar to humans. though. Naked apes that we are.
 
2014-07-02 03:55:10 AM

gaspode: We do not know how hard/rare the creation of an initial replicator capable of change is.

If it is very hard/rare then life will be rare.
If it is easy/common then life in countless complex forms will be everywhere.

Once it starts complexity is going to happen. Natural selection is the inevitable result of a replicator. Be told.


That brings an interesting question.  It's theorized that all life on Earth is derived from a common ancestor organism.  Could we extrapolate the probabilty of how rare it is for such an organism to form based on the assumption that no other "replicator capable of change" has emerged since?  Or, could such occurances have be snuffed out from competition by established species?
 
2014-07-02 03:58:58 AM

delciotto: Honestly if another planet that is similar to ours exists somewhere with intelligent life, I'm guessing they would end up looking a lot like us if not exactly like us.


They wouldn't neccessarily look a lot like US, but they may end up looking a lot like a species we already have or used to have.  It's arguably a matter of chance that primates were the ones to get over that evolutionary hump into sapient, tool weilding, dominant life form.  It could have happened to Koala Bears or even regular bears.  There may be a planet of intelligent, civilized pandas somewhere in the universe.  Or maybe not even a mammal.  Maybe a communal life form like Ants capable of building cities and machines and such.
 
2014-07-02 04:06:09 AM

Ambivalence: delciotto: Honestly if another planet that is similar to ours exists somewhere with intelligent life, I'm guessing they would end up looking a lot like us if not exactly like us.

They wouldn't neccessarily look a lot like US, but they may end up looking a lot like a species we already have or used to have.  It's arguably a matter of chance that primates were the ones to get over that evolutionary hump into sapient, tool weilding, dominant life form.  It could have happened to Koala Bears or even regular bears.  There may be a planet of intelligent, civilized pandas somewhere in the universe.  Or maybe not even a mammal.  Maybe a communal life form like Ants capable of building cities and machines and such.


In the DCU, there's a race of sentient, intelligent smallpox viruses...one of them is a Green Lantern. Also, there's a sentient abstract mathematical equation who is also a GL.

I seem to remember a book where some constantly re-enlivened clones ran across sentient, intelligent bears sometimes in Earth's far future.
 
2014-07-02 04:16:47 AM

Ambivalence: Maybe a communal life form like Ants capable of building cities and machines and such.


Ants aren't a communal life form. They're colony insects. Each ant is just a half blind chick trying to get by with her sisters and mom in a hole in the ground. Individually, they display as much intelligence as any other insects. More, actually, because they're so well studied. We know they teach each other and have at least some verbal communication.

The ant colony is no more a life form than a city full of humans is. Or rather, no less.
 
2014-07-02 04:32:12 AM

doglover: Ambivalence: Maybe a communal life form like Ants capable of building cities and machines and such.

Ants aren't a communal life form. They're colony insects. Each ant is just a half blind chick trying to get by with her sisters and mom in a hole in the ground. Individually, they display as much intelligence as any other insects. More, actually, because they're so well studied. We know they teach each other and have at least some verbal communication.

The ant colony is no more a life form than a city full of humans is. Or rather, no less.


Well, yah, here on Earth. But who knows how they COULD evolve given different environment and competition.  Who would think something similar to a bonobo could evolve to be us?

Obviously atmospheric conditions here mean that any species with an exoskeleton is at a disadvantage, size-wise.  But who knows how those disadvantages could be compensated for through evolution?
 
2014-07-02 04:46:03 AM

Ambivalence: Who would think something similar to a bonobo could evolve to be us?


Well, bonobos won that game. Hands down.

I bet we won't find space monkeys, but if we do, they better be farking space monkeys.
 
2014-07-02 04:58:37 AM

neongoats: delciotto: Honestly if another planet that is similar to ours exists somewhere with intelligent life, I'm guessing they would end up looking a lot like us if not exactly like us.

Why would they end up looking a lot like us? That's a pretty big presumption.

They need a body plan that can support a big, energy intensive brain. They need a limb plan with a high degree of ability to use tools.

We might be able to say they have a similar chemistry to earth like fauna if the planet is similar to earth. We might be able to shoot in the dark and say they might be bilaterally symmetrical.

I'm not sure how any of that points to them logically having to look similar to humans. though. Naked apes that we are.


Maybe not a lot like us in the details, but I'm betting the biped plan is probably a pretty common one if the universe has a good amount of life in it. You are somewhat constrained by basic physics, so the end result of animal-type life is probably some sort of quadruped with a "head" at the front to help it find food more efficiently. Eventually one of those quadrupeds evolves into a biped and so you wind up with something that is not too far removed from human body plan at least in the large brush strokes. Similarly, there are probably only so many ways that you can arrange legs, body segments, and sense organs without running into something that vaguely resembles something that has already been tried on Earth.

Also, when it comes to the building blocks of life, chemistry likely limits you quite a bit as well. It's hard to really make any kind of self-replicating molecules work without using carbon as the basis. Atoms like silicon just have certain fatal flaws in their chemistry that get in the way of any reasonable replication, like not being as varied as carbon in the ties of bonds it can form. Also, chances are that on an Earthlike planet photosynthesis is going to get invented at some point and when it does those creatures are eventually going to outcompete everything else that uses more rare methods of getting energy (like ocean vents and other geologic energy), which eventually leads to an Oxygen Catastrophe that opens the door for energetic oxygen breathing organisms (of course the different sizes of planets could change the atmospheric pressure and oxygen concentrations, making the atmosphere fatal to us even if it is mostly oxygen).

It's really kind of a pet peeve of mine that so often people just throw up their hands and just say alien life will be incomprehensibly weird without really considering what kind of constraints nature puts on life. Sure it'll be weird, but I have to wonder if we might not be a little disappointed by how much convergence there winds up being to forms we find vaguely familiar. for example, I'm willing to bet good money that a lot of alien water dwelling organisms wind up looking surprisingly fish-like simply due basic hydrodynamic streamlining.
 
2014-07-02 05:03:14 AM

Mad_Radhu: It's really kind of a pet peeve of mine that so often people just throw up their hands and just say alien life will be incomprehensibly weird without really considering what kind of constraints nature puts on life. Sure it'll be weird, but I have to wonder if we might not be a little disappointed by how much convergence there winds up being to forms we find vaguely familiar. for example, I'm willing to bet good money that a lot of alien water dwelling organisms wind up looking surprisingly fish-like simply due basic hydrodynamic streamlining.


So are you implying there's nothing new under any sun (much less ours)?

I suppose it's true that there are only a finite number of ways life (much less intelligent life) can happen, but it's folly to think that we have an understanding of all the finite ways it can happen based on our experience on Earth.
 
2014-07-02 05:06:34 AM

Ambivalence: gaspode: We do not know how hard/rare the creation of an initial replicator capable of change is.

If it is very hard/rare then life will be rare.
If it is easy/common then life in countless complex forms will be everywhere.

Once it starts complexity is going to happen. Natural selection is the inevitable result of a replicator. Be told.

That brings an interesting question.  It's theorized that all life on Earth is derived from a common ancestor organism.  Could we extrapolate the probabilty of how rare it is for such an organism to form based on the assumption that no other "replicator capable of change" has emerged since?  Or, could such occurances have be snuffed out from competition by established species?


I'd say chances are that there is just too much competition from established species for any proto-life to get going outside of lab conditions because actual life gobbles up anything that could be used as the building blocks for that almost life. Also, the current atmosphere is full of oxygen unlike early Earth, which tends to be really destructive to the kinds of molecules that are theorized to be precursors to life, oxidizing those molecules before they have a chance to do their thing. From my understanding of it, basically the Oxygen Catastrophe killed a bunch of the anaerobic early life ad pushed the survivors into the oxygen-free margins of the world.
 
2014-07-02 05:14:46 AM
Maybe all the other civilizations just destroy themselves when they have enough technology to do so, just like we will.
 
2014-07-02 05:16:43 AM
There's just 2% delta in DNA between chimps and humans. That 2% represents physiological difference is so great that the separation of behaviors and abilities so wide that we habpve been able to make computers and go to the moon and look back almost to the beginning of time.

We have mathematics, art, language, etc. they hump each other in the forest and fling poo. We dream and achieve they simply exist and replicate.

We are the result of 3+ billion years of evolution resulting in happenstance of mutation, climate changes, and a slew of other obstacles. We're what made it through the gauntlet.

All of those variables would not exist in that order, on the same timescales somewhere else.

If life is an inevitable state of hydrocarbons in a certain temperature and pressure and solar radiation range, there may be some commonality of symmetry to conserve replication complexity but the form would be the one which survived in that other environment. Perhaps a higher gravitational field would select against bipedalism. Too little might favor flyers.

We know this now that even when starting with the same genome for twins, their respective genome diverges as they each grow older as replication errors and mutation affect each twin uniquely. DNA is not linearly deterministic, it creates genes and proteins and ribosomes which in turn do other things based on environmental inputs. It's all very complex and non-linear.

Alien life may sit idle at the "exist, replicate, die" cycle for a long period until their brain can mutate and expand past basic needs of survival. IIRC what may have been the turning point for humans was cooking -- essentially predigesting food -- which allowed the skull to weaken and expand since it didn't have to be flat and thick to support huge jaw muscles for eating raw food. That allowed the cranial cavity to expand and the cerebral cortex of homosapiens to expand and gain new functions like mirror neurons which lead to empthy and perhaps rudimentary imagination.

So I think life elsewhere would be very different. But intelligent life comparatively rare.

That's why preserving and cherishing what we have accomplished and can do is so important.
 
2014-07-02 05:21:58 AM

Ambivalence: Mad_Radhu: It's really kind of a pet peeve of mine that so often people just throw up their hands and just say alien life will be incomprehensibly weird without really considering what kind of constraints nature puts on life. Sure it'll be weird, but I have to wonder if we might not be a little disappointed by how much convergence there winds up being to forms we find vaguely familiar. for example, I'm willing to bet good money that a lot of alien water dwelling organisms wind up looking surprisingly fish-like simply due basic hydrodynamic streamlining.

So are you implying there's nothing new under any sun (much less ours)?

I suppose it's true that there are only a finite number of ways life (much less intelligent life) can happen, but it's folly to think that we have an understanding of all the finite ways it can happen based on our experience on Earth.


I'm sure there are probably a lot of organisms that are very different when it comes to the details of how they work because they went through very different evolutionary paths, but at the same time I think a lot of the major body plans tend to converge because there's only so many different ways you can put the pieces together and still have a workable organism. Life on Earth is crazy diverse, but at the same time you have to wonder if it didn't exhaust the majority of the available body plans during the Cambrian Explosion. For an animal type organism, you've got a head thing, a body thing where the bulk of the organs hang out, and some leg things to move around, grasp, and poke things. There's only so many ways you can put that stuff together and still have it function in an efficient way because of fundamental things like biomechanics.

For example, when it comes to eyes, unless you go the compound route, there is not a lot of leeway in how weird it can be because you have optical laws to contend with, which really increases the odds that an alien would have something that we'd be able to easily recognize as an eye. Similarly, binocular vision has a clear advantage for hunting, but adding a third eye really doesn't have much of a survival advantage, and 4 or 6 just seems like an overcomplicated waste of resources for larger organisms (although smaller organisms with simpler nervous systems can get away with more numerous simpler compound eyes).
 
2014-07-02 05:28:19 AM

lohphat: There's just 2% delta in DNA between chimps and humans. That 2% represents physiological difference is so great that the separation of behaviors and abilities so wide that we habpve been able to make computers and go to the moon and look back almost to the beginning of time.

We have mathematics, art, language, etc. they hump each other in the forest and fling poo. We dream and achieve they simply exist and replicate.


          THE world is too much with us; late and soon,
          Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers:
          Little we see in Nature that is ours;
          We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
          The Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;
          The winds that will be howling at all hours,
          And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;
          For this, for everything, we are out of tune;
          It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be
          A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
          So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
          Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
          Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
          Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn.

                                    -William Wordsworth

I thought it kind of ironic that there's a poem lamenting how advanced civilization has ruined humanity and yearning for a simpler time of wonder.  Maybe life as a chimp isn't so inferior after all.  Who knows, maybe they do dream, they're just too zen about life for us to notice.
 
2014-07-02 05:41:45 AM

Ambivalence: Who knows, maybe they do dream, they're just too zen about life for us to notice.


Some chimp clans will wage war and hunt down and kill surviving members of the opposing clan. Life in the wild is pretty unsavory and short.

Just existing was the story for 3 billion years. We've done wondrous things only in the last few thousand.

I'd rather know the points of light in the sky are suns and not angels. Or a painted carpet hung by an imaginary fiend. Learning how the world actually works and is, is more wondrous than any mythology could concoct.

We've even demonstrated we can teach other species to live together if they are hand reared and socialized. Something not seen frequently in the wild. Perhaps we can engineer more mirror neurons and share the awareness they give via empathy.
 
2014-07-02 05:50:59 AM

Ambivalence: I thought it kind of ironic that there's a poem lamenting how advanced civilization has ruined humanity and yearning for a simpler time of wonder.


We don't have advanced civilization. We have advanced technology, yes, but civilization is pretty much the same as it's ever been.

Hell, democracy wasn't only invented in ancient Greece, it was used better. Imagine how much more awesome America would be with ostracons added to the November ballot.
 
2014-07-02 05:55:29 AM

doglover: Ambivalence: I thought it kind of ironic that there's a poem lamenting how advanced civilization has ruined humanity and yearning for a simpler time of wonder.

We don't have advanced civilization. We have advanced technology, yes, but civilization is pretty much the same as it's ever been.

Hell, democracy wasn't only invented in ancient Greece, it was used better. Imagine how much more awesome America would be with ostracons added to the November ballot.


Eh...Women's rights still sucked in the democratic parts of ancient Greece so in that respect I don't know if it was better.
 
2014-07-02 06:07:55 AM

doglover: Ambivalence: Who would think something similar to a bonobo could evolve to be us?

Well, bonobos won that game. Hands down.

I bet we won't find space monkeys, but if we do, they better be farking space monkeys.


i.imgur.com

Kiff, get that space monkey's name and put it in my black book of "drunk dial later"
 
2014-07-02 06:10:41 AM

lohphat: Ambivalence: Who knows, maybe they do dream, they're just too zen about life for us to notice.

Some chimp clans will wage war and hunt down and kill surviving members of the opposing clan. Life in the wild is pretty unsavory and short.

Just existing was the story for 3 billion years. We've done wondrous things only in the last few thousand.

I'd rather know the points of light in the sky are suns and not angels. Or a painted carpet hung by an imaginary fiend. Learning how the world actually works and is, is more wondrous than any mythology could concoct.

We've even demonstrated we can teach other species to live together if they are hand reared and socialized. Something not seen frequently in the wild. Perhaps we can engineer more mirror neurons and share the awareness they give via empathy.


38.media.tumblr.com

/Futurama all the things!
 
2014-07-02 06:11:56 AM
...On the other hand, Carl Sagan once pointed out - and rightly, IIRC - that even if you were to somehow replicate the steps leading up to life somewhere else, the ultimate end result won't be people.  It won't look like us, it won't think like us, because it couldn't possibly evolve like us.

/YMMV
 
2014-07-02 06:36:21 AM
Probably like this:
www.ebiomedia.com
You can genuinely geeked about alien life, or dream of bug-eyed monsters and pretend you are.  If we find microbes on another planet the media will struggle with ways to make it sound "interesting" while scientists will be giggling like schoolchildren after the teacher farted.  Because there will definitely be something interesting about it, but it would require reading to understand and Americans don't do that anymore.
 
2014-07-02 06:48:20 AM
img.fark.net

Who needs alien life, anyway. We just have to use what we've already got more cromulently.
 
2014-07-02 06:51:22 AM

doglover: [img.fark.net image 800x600]

Who needs alien life, anyway. We just have to use what we've already got more cromulently.


There's some elements of that image missing. If that bear goes anywhere, me and my mysterious bubbless beer are getting road hauled.
 
2014-07-02 07:01:45 AM

Ambivalence: gaspode: We do not know how hard/rare the creation of an initial replicator capable of change is.

If it is very hard/rare then life will be rare.
If it is easy/common then life in countless complex forms will be everywhere.

Once it starts complexity is going to happen. Natural selection is the inevitable result of a replicator. Be told.

That brings an interesting question.  It's theorized that all life on Earth is derived from a common ancestor organism.  Could we extrapolate the probabilty of how rare it is for such an organism to form based on the assumption that no other "replicator capable of change" has emerged since?  Or, could such occurances have be snuffed out from competition by established species?


Yes, essentially the name of any simple protein based replicator in a world full of complex evolved replicators is 'lunch'. It could be happening on a weekly basis all over the world and I suspect we would never know.
 
2014-07-02 07:07:26 AM

hubiestubert: unyon: Well?  Where the fark is everybody then?

Watching. Waiting. Seeing if the real estate here is going to go down in value in another few thousand years, or if we're going to get our heads out of our asses and produce something of value to trade for...


d1jqu7g1y74ds1.cloudfront.net

L is always going to be the big one.
 
2014-07-02 07:35:06 AM
This makes how many articles about this topic in the last month? Is the ten-year-old in charge of the videos tab taking care of the geek tab as well?
 
2014-07-02 07:38:52 AM

delciotto: Honestly if another planet that is similar to ours exists somewhere with intelligent life, I'm guessing they would end up looking a lot like us if not exactly like us.


Why? There are many possible configurations for a obligate tool user to take.
 
2014-07-02 07:42:44 AM

fusillade762: hubiestubert: unyon: Well?  Where the fark is everybody then?

Watching. Waiting. Seeing if the real estate here is going to go down in value in another few thousand years, or if we're going to get our heads out of our asses and produce something of value to trade for...

[d1jqu7g1y74ds1.cloudfront.net image 400x285]

L is always going to be the big one.


You forgot Bs

Bs= the amount of bullshiat you're willing to buy from Francis Drake
 
2014-07-02 08:44:00 AM

unyon: Well?  Where the fark is everybody then?


Really far away. You see, space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.
 
2014-07-02 08:48:29 AM
Good old drake equation...
The main problem with it is assuming life is distributed equally, and communicative life no less.

Earth itself was host to nothing more than pond scum for a few hundred million years and it's highest tier animal has just learned about radio waves.
We aren't in a position to say how common life is elsewhere because we've barely started to look. We aren't in a position to say when life got started anywhere but here, or how long it should take to get to our stage (two hundred million years with complex life, one instance of technology using life).

With all that there is a good chance we just happen to be in a dry spot.  Maybe some regional event wiped out everything here, or maybe it just didn't happen within this arm of the galactic system becauseof some factor in our stellar group.
Advanced life could be very common, but if its not common within a hundred light years then there's no way we'd know this easily.
 
2014-07-02 09:01:38 AM
If you want to know what alien life looks like go outside.  We would be alien to any other world out there that is wondering the same thing.
 
2014-07-02 09:05:27 AM

Mad_Radhu: Maybe not a lot like us in the details, but I'm betting the biped plan is probably a pretty common one if the universe has a good amount of life in it. You are somewhat constrained by basic physics, so the end result of animal-type life is probably some sort of quadruped with a "head" at the front to help it find food more efficiently. Eventually one of those quadrupeds evolves into a biped and so you wind up with something that is not too far removed from human body plan at least in the large brush strokes. Similarly, there are probably only so many ways that you can arrange legs, body segments, and sense organs without running into something that vaguely resembles something that has already been tried on Earth.


I don't know about bipedal because there is no reason there couldn't be centaur like creatures. I do agree that there won't alien life forms we won't recognise as life forms. Looking at the insane spread of body types on Earth, there doesn't seem to be any reason why alien life would be so horribly different that we can't see it for what it is.
 
2014-07-02 09:15:36 AM

unyon: Well?  Where the fark is everybody then?


How do we know aliens have not visited? What if they visited 6000 years ago before there was writing? We have only been writing down what we see for ~5200 years. That is less than a blink of the eye in the cosmos. Would be funny if the ancient alien guys were correct, lol

Or what if they have not found us yet? Space is farking huge.
 
2014-07-02 09:24:25 AM
Because no work of fiction is ever based on real science.
 
2014-07-02 09:25:12 AM

AtlanticCoast63: ...On the other hand, Carl Sagan once pointed out - and rightly, IIRC - that even if you were to somehow replicate the steps leading up to life somewhere else, the ultimate end result won't be people.  It won't look like us, it won't think like us, because it couldn't possibly evolve like us.


If a lion could speak we couldn't understand it.
 
Displayed 50 of 85 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report