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(Keloland)   This just in: clearing clogged grass from a running lawnmower is a bad idea   (keloland.com) divider line 152
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5957 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Jul 2014 at 8:13 PM (11 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-07-01 10:47:43 PM
Do modern mowers really have a deadman's switch that shuts down the mower? I'll have to check that out sometimes.
 
2014-07-01 10:49:51 PM
Ran over a plastic tarp with a 54 inch deck. It two hours  with a box knife to get it out of the blades
 
2014-07-01 11:01:24 PM

Gaseous Anomaly: A safety email at work actually taught me something once, and it was about this.

If the blades get jammed up with a stick, use another stick to remove the stuck stick, even though the mower isn't running - there could be some tension built up that lets the blade leap forward when the stuck stick is removed.


So...Unstick a stuck stick by sticking it with nonstuck sticks?
 
2014-07-01 11:07:51 PM
My dad once accidentally ran over a litter of baby rabbits with a lawnmower. Gory, disturbing.

/csb
 
2014-07-01 11:14:10 PM

The Larch: Do modern mowers really have a deadman's switch that shuts down the mower? I'll have to check that out sometimes.


It's Federal requirement. Page down to section 1205.5
 
2014-07-01 11:14:37 PM
Oooooohhhhh.........
 
2014-07-01 11:15:11 PM
Why in the hell anyone would put their fingers anywhere near a mower blade without it being off for several days is beyond me.  If your mower gets clogged with a bunch of grass, USE A STICK TO CLEAR IT OUT.  A) You only risk the stick, not your fingers, and B) a stick is better at scraping the mulched up grass off the walls of the mower than your finger could ever be.

Gas mowers can suddenly start up on their own for a few more strokes, even minutes after you let go of their safety bar, and electric mowers can have capacitors that can store a bit of charge, even if you unplug them/remove the battery.

Use a farking stick.
 
2014-07-01 11:16:26 PM

BluVeinThrobber: The perfect mower

[img.fark.net image 203x248]


Can still bite your fingers off.
 
2014-07-01 11:19:31 PM

moeburn: BluVeinThrobber: The perfect mower

[img.fark.net image 203x248]

Can still bite your fingers off.


Why would you have your fingers in his mouth?
 
2014-07-01 11:20:30 PM

BluVeinThrobber: moeburn: BluVeinThrobber: The perfect mower

[img.fark.net image 203x248]

Can still bite your fingers off.

Why would you have your fingers in his mouth?


There is also the guy upthread who was talking about losing another appendage.
 
2014-07-01 11:22:24 PM

sporkme: BluVeinThrobber: moeburn: BluVeinThrobber: The perfect mower

[img.fark.net image 203x248]

Can still bite your fingers off.

Why would you have your fingers in his mouth?

There is also the guy upthread who was talking about losing another appendage.


38.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-07-01 11:24:24 PM

sporkme: BluVeinThrobber: moeburn: BluVeinThrobber: The perfect mower

[img.fark.net image 203x248]

Can still bite your fingers off.

Why would you have your fingers in his mouth?

There is also the guy upthread who was talking about losing another appendage.


He was at the wrong end
 
gja [TotalFark]
2014-07-01 11:53:14 PM

Sin_City_Superhero: I lost a penis that way once...don't ask.


Just "A" penis? You had more than 1 at the time?
"Superhero" indeed. I need to get to LV and do a titty-bar crawl with you, you madman!
 
2014-07-01 11:59:17 PM
No love for Steve Hemingsen?


Some things are too obscure for fark.
 
2014-07-02 12:08:57 AM

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: farkingismybusiness: At least it's safer than his other method.

But I don't see the other guy holding his beer...


He's using his free hand to hold the camera.
 
2014-07-02 12:16:00 AM

gja: Sin_City_Superhero: I lost a penis that way once...don't ask.

Just "A" penis? You had more than 1 at the time?
"Superhero" indeed. I need to get to LV and do a titty-bar crawl with you, you madman!


What part of "don't ask" did you not comprehend?
 
2014-07-02 12:23:41 AM
My ma lost the tips of two fingers clearing a clog. as others have said even if the machine is off it can still kick back for a few strokes after the blockage is removed
 
2014-07-02 12:30:06 AM

vernonFL: This goes for snowblowers in the winter too.


The ERs have had more than one repeat customer who cleared the snow blower again with his remaining fingers.
 
2014-07-02 12:51:14 AM
cannot believe this has not been posted
 
2014-07-02 01:12:28 AM

fusillade762: Lionel Mandrake: Also: don't push too hard on branches when feeding a wood-chipper.

I lost my head and half of my spine that way.

[www.constantineintokyo.com image 850x565]


Came here for the How To Mow Your Yard On PCP guy. But I'll pay that one.^^

http://vimeo.com/40740806

img.fark.net
 
2014-07-02 01:18:31 AM

Azz Pumper: No mention of pulling a push mower up a hill????  Have an uncle who lost some toes pulling a mower over his foot.


My fifth grade teacher's husband left the mower at the top of a hill (this was before safety was invented). When it started rolling down, he tried stopping it with his foot.

/ Didn't want it rolling into the creek at the bottom, y'know
 
2014-07-02 01:38:17 AM

buckler: ArcadianRefugee: buckler: Al!: Mugato: ajgeek: but the fact that safety features don't exist on some of these machines (I'm talking real safety features, not "let's put a symbolic strip of piss poor steel here")

Well when you let go of the mower, the blades stop. If you need more of a safety feature than that, it's between you, Darwin and God.

To piggyback on what ManateeGag said:

I was about 11 (1990ish) and had been told to never, ever reach underneath the mower unless it had been properly "disarmed," lest I be disarmed myself.  I was mowing the neighbors yard and his yard grew unevenly.  The front and sides got lots of sun, the back lots of shade, thus leaving the front and sides growing slowly and the back a jungle if it ever went a week or more during the summer.  I was mowing the back and the blades bogged down enough that the mower stopped.  My normal method of clearing it was to rock the mower back and drop it hard to shake the grass out.  When that didn't work, I let go of the deadman switch, tilted the mower back to allow easier access, and right as I reached down to free the giant clump of grass the mower kicked to life for one entire stroke.  Had I been 2 seconds faster reaching in there I would be typing this with only my right hand.  Instead I learned a valuable lesson: don't ever trust a safety feature when you know a safer method.

Not to be too pedantic, but wouldn't a deadman's switch start the mower when released?


[3.bp.blogspot.com image 200x150]

"Switches can be used to turn things on and/or off."

Deadmans' switches typically allow current to run when the switch is released.


Not usually. It's circuit dependent. A deadmans's switch is designed to stop the device when released. It usually means stopping electrical current by opening a the circuit. It could close a circuit that would actuate a relay, but I don't recall ever seeing one set up like that, and I've worked on and repaired a vast array of different machinery like tractors, backhoes, excavators, lifts, etc.

So, what you say could be true and correct, but not likely. I'm guessing you're not a mechanic by trade, nor have you done and electrical troubleshooting on any kind of machinery whatsoever.
 
2014-07-02 01:43:07 AM

TwowheelinTim: I'm guessing you're not a mechanic by trade, nor have you done and electrical troubleshooting on any kind of machinery whatsoever.


I'll be completely forthright and honest. I have all the mechanical aptitude of Wile E. Coyote.
 
2014-07-02 01:46:37 AM

TwowheelinTim: buckler: ArcadianRefugee: buckler: Al!: Mugato: ajgeek: but the fact that safety features don't exist on some of these machines (I'm talking real safety features, not "let's put a symbolic strip of piss poor steel here")

Well when you let go of the mower, the blades stop. If you need more of a safety feature than that, it's between you, Darwin and God.

To piggyback on what ManateeGag said:

I was about 11 (1990ish) and had been told to never, ever reach underneath the mower unless it had been properly "disarmed," lest I be disarmed myself.  I was mowing the neighbors yard and his yard grew unevenly.  The front and sides got lots of sun, the back lots of shade, thus leaving the front and sides growing slowly and the back a jungle if it ever went a week or more during the summer.  I was mowing the back and the blades bogged down enough that the mower stopped.  My normal method of clearing it was to rock the mower back and drop it hard to shake the grass out.  When that didn't work, I let go of the deadman switch, tilted the mower back to allow easier access, and right as I reached down to free the giant clump of grass the mower kicked to life for one entire stroke.  Had I been 2 seconds faster reaching in there I would be typing this with only my right hand.  Instead I learned a valuable lesson: don't ever trust a safety feature when you know a safer method.

Not to be too pedantic, but wouldn't a deadman's switch start the mower when released?


[3.bp.blogspot.com image 200x150]

"Switches can be used to turn things on and/or off."

Deadmans' switches typically allow current to run when the switch is released.

Not usually. It's circuit dependent. A deadmans's switch is designed to stop the device when released. It usually means stopping electrical current by opening a the circuit. It could close a circuit that would actuate a relay, but I don't recall ever seeing one set up like that, and I've worked on and repaired a vast array of different machinery like tractor ...


Oh, and small gasoline engines usually do close a circuit to ground out the ignition.

I guess that's what was being discussed anyway right?

/slinks away...
 
Al!
2014-07-02 03:45:07 AM

buckler: Al!: Mugato: ajgeek: but the fact that safety features don't exist on some of these machines (I'm talking real safety features, not "let's put a symbolic strip of piss poor steel here")

Well when you let go of the mower, the blades stop. If you need more of a safety feature than that, it's between you, Darwin and God.

To piggyback on what ManateeGag said:

I was about 11 (1990ish) and had been told to never, ever reach underneath the mower unless it had been properly "disarmed," lest I be disarmed myself.  I was mowing the neighbors yard and his yard grew unevenly.  The front and sides got lots of sun, the back lots of shade, thus leaving the front and sides growing slowly and the back a jungle if it ever went a week or more during the summer.  I was mowing the back and the blades bogged down enough that the mower stopped.  My normal method of clearing it was to rock the mower back and drop it hard to shake the grass out.  When that didn't work, I let go of the deadman switch, tilted the mower back to allow easier access, and right as I reached down to free the giant clump of grass the mower kicked to life for one entire stroke.  Had I been 2 seconds faster reaching in there I would be typing this with only my right hand.  Instead I learned a valuable lesson: don't ever trust a safety feature when you know a safer method.

Not to be too pedantic, but wouldn't a deadman's switch start the mower when released?


Although it's been covered, specifically a deadman switch is a switch designed to operate when released, as in "dead men let go of switches."  They are on all sorts of industrial equipment, from pallet jacks and fork trucks to cranes and lifts.  Most do their action in the form of preventing action of the machine.  Explosive deadman switches, as noted, do their action in the form of making the machine (a bomb) do its action.  Their are deadman switches for explosives that operate in the traditional manner, ensuring the switch is engaged before exploding, so that inadvertent explosions can be prevented.
 
2014-07-02 04:40:53 AM

ArcadianRefugee: This Saturday is one of my favorite schadenfreude days: the day when I get to read about all the dumbshiats who injured themselves with fireworks.


+1

Brofist.
 
2014-07-02 06:00:57 AM

BluVeinThrobber: The perfect mower

[img.fark.net image 203x248]



My neighbors have been using this one recently.

scontent-b-sea.xx.fbcdn.net


Yeah, I'm jelly!

/ Must be goat-break time.
 
2014-07-02 06:06:29 AM

Al!: Mugato: ajgeek: but the fact that safety features don't exist on some of these machines (I'm talking real safety features, not "let's put a symbolic strip of piss poor steel here")

Well when you let go of the mower, the blades stop. If you need more of a safety feature than that, it's between you, Darwin and God.

To piggyback on what ManateeGag said:

I was about 11 (1990ish) and had been told to never, ever reach underneath the mower unless it had been properly "disarmed," lest I be disarmed myself.  I was mowing the neighbors yard and his yard grew unevenly.  The front and sides got lots of sun, the back lots of shade, thus leaving the front and sides growing slowly and the back a jungle if it ever went a week or more during the summer.  I was mowing the back and the blades bogged down enough that the mower stopped.  My normal method of clearing it was to rock the mower back and drop it hard to shake the grass out.  When that didn't work, I let go of the deadman switch, tilted the mower back to allow easier access, and right as I reached down to free the giant clump of grass the mower kicked to life for one entire stroke.  Had I been 2 seconds faster reaching in there I would be typing this with only my right hand.  Instead I learned a valuable lesson: don't ever trust a safety feature when you know a safer method.


Actually safety advocates say that you should pull the spark plug cap to make sure the mower (or snowblower) won't start up.
 
2014-07-02 07:30:31 AM
I think I am getting too old.
When ever I see this:
www.bikinilawn.com
I think - 'She is going to get hurt the second that mower finds any foreign object.

There is a lady that does this that lives about a mile from me.
Was attractive ten years ago, but now it's a double whammy - too old to pull it off, and still unsafe.
 
2014-07-02 08:04:39 AM

12349876: If it's not a riding, just lift it up and let it bang on the ground a few times.  That should usually get it, unless it's REALLY high or wet.


... like I like my women.
 
2014-07-02 08:23:07 AM
I tend to let the grass go for to long (I just cut you 3 weeks ago! What do you want from me!!??), so it's too thick to mulch and I have to attach the chute. Well, really thick areas clog the chute, so I devised a method to fix this. I leave the chute off and use a screwdriver to prop the mulch/chute door open. With no chute to get bogged up in, I rarely have clogging issues. On the rare occasions it does get clogged like that, I use something brown and sticky to clear it.
 
2014-07-02 08:27:05 AM
I find this funny, since the biggest, baddest lawn machine I get to drive is a Skag.  If it gets clogged, I don't shut it down, I just reach over and pull the side discharge up and bungee it out of the way if I hadn't already done it.  It unjams by itself, and I can't fall off, it has a seatbelt.

12349876: If it's not a riding, just lift it up and let it bang on the ground a few times.  That should usually get it, unless it's REALLY high or wet.


And this.
 
2014-07-02 08:41:12 AM

moeburn: Why in the hell anyone would put their fingers anywhere near a mower blade without it being off for several days is beyond me.  If your mower gets clogged with a bunch of grass, USE A STICK TO CLEAR IT OUT.  A) You only risk the stick, not your fingers, and B) a stick is better at scraping the mulched up grass off the walls of the mower than your finger could ever be.

Gas mowers can suddenly start up on their own for a few more strokes, even minutes after you let go of their safety bar, and electric mowers can have capacitors that can store a bit of charge, even if you unplug them/remove the battery.

Use a farking stick.


Um, that safety bar is a brake that does not allow the motor to turn over, it cannot restart by itself unless the brake is very worn.  But if you are that scared of the machine, pull the plug wire.  You can then rotate the blade to your heart's content and never start the machine.  I don't touch electric mowers, mostly because they cost too much and can't cut my yard in the spring.  They can handle my yard in the late summer, but spring brings fast growing grass that will clog any mower with less than 5hp.
 
2014-07-02 09:27:42 AM
Jesus cuts my grass, with help from some of his friends.
 
2014-07-02 09:29:00 AM

Inflatable Rhetoric: Jesus cuts my grass, with help from some of his friends.


I don't own a mower, I don't store gasoline, I don't buy gasoline in cans.  I have never done that.
 
2014-07-02 10:13:47 AM
We had a big hill in the back yard growing up and my dad set up this awesome contraption where he'd stand at the top of the hill holding ropes to pull the mower back and forth across the hill.  My mom was smart enough to make the kids and the dogs come inside the house whenever he was mowing up there.
 
2014-07-02 10:13:49 AM

ArcadianRefugee: Goodammit to hell.

THIS

[img.fark.net image 320x192]

is the sad thing that happened.

Now I'm laughing and talking about a kid run over by a lawn mower.

Aw, shiat.


studebaker hoch: [manuals.deere.com image 312x192]
[manuals.deere.com image 312x192]

[manuals.deere.com image 320x192]

[encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com image 268x188]



#3 happened to a guy/family I know.

lulz
 
2014-07-02 11:12:50 AM
i met a guy who lost part of his foot using a lawn mower on a kind of steep slope.  he was pulling it up towards himself and his foot slipped in the wet grass and went under the mower.  he lost all of his toes except for the big toe.  it was cut at an angle from just inside the big toe back towards the heel.  it looked crazy, one big pointed goofy looking thing.  I told him he should do the other one that way, then he could climb a chain link fence like nobody's business.

csb
 
2014-07-02 11:14:56 AM

ArcadianRefugee: This Saturday is one of my favorite schadenfreude days: the day when I get to read about all the dumbshiats who injured themselves with fireworks.


I was kinda surprised that the article-writer associates the threat of severe hand injuries sustained over an Independence Day weekend with lawnmowers...
 
2014-07-02 11:18:01 AM

WTP 2: with 5 kids you learn fast
after the first 4 got hurt trying to clear the clogs the little fast one did the trick,
and i have been using him sense.
family motto is  "wait i think i can do it better".


Hence the 5 kids, ja?
 
2014-07-02 11:29:22 AM

NewWorldDan: My grandpa lost 3 fingers to a lawn mower.  July 24, 1978.  I know the date because that's also the night my sister was born.  He ran in to my parents at the hospital and that's how we learned about it.


"Three Traumatic Amputations and an Episiotomy"...sounds like something Hugh Grant would star in...
 
gja [TotalFark]
2014-07-02 11:49:07 AM

Sin_City_Superhero: gja: Sin_City_Superhero: I lost a penis that way once...don't ask.

Just "A" penis? You had more than 1 at the time?
"Superhero" indeed. I need to get to LV and do a titty-bar crawl with you, you madman!

What part of "don't ask" did you not comprehend?


LOL. Thanks for a good laugh in a rough workday.
 
2014-07-02 01:33:01 PM
www.gamefabrique.com
 
2014-07-02 01:35:27 PM
colon_pow:
I told him he should do the other one that way, then he could climb a chain link fence like nobody's business.

This made my day.  Thanks!  Everybody at the shop laughed their asses off.
 
2014-07-02 01:55:14 PM

sporkme: colon_pow:
I told him he should do the other one that way, then he could climb a chain link fence like nobody's business.

This made my day.  Thanks!  Everybody at the shop laughed their asses off.


I met the dude in the joint so going over fences was something that often thought about.
 
Al!
2014-07-02 05:54:20 PM

MBrady: Al!: Mugato: ajgeek: but the fact that safety features don't exist on some of these machines (I'm talking real safety features, not "let's put a symbolic strip of piss poor steel here")

Well when you let go of the mower, the blades stop. If you need more of a safety feature than that, it's between you, Darwin and God.

To piggyback on what ManateeGag said:

I was about 11 (1990ish) and had been told to never, ever reach underneath the mower unless it had been properly "disarmed," lest I be disarmed myself.  I was mowing the neighbors yard and his yard grew unevenly.  The front and sides got lots of sun, the back lots of shade, thus leaving the front and sides growing slowly and the back a jungle if it ever went a week or more during the summer.  I was mowing the back and the blades bogged down enough that the mower stopped.  My normal method of clearing it was to rock the mower back and drop it hard to shake the grass out.  When that didn't work, I let go of the deadman switch, tilted the mower back to allow easier access, and right as I reached down to free the giant clump of grass the mower kicked to life for one entire stroke.  Had I been 2 seconds faster reaching in there I would be typing this with only my right hand.  Instead I learned a valuable lesson: don't ever trust a safety feature when you know a safer method.

Actually safety advocates say that you should pull the spark plug cap to make sure the mower (or snowblower) won't start up.


What exactly did you think I meant when I said the mower needed to be "disarmed" and that I knew a safer method than relying on the deadman switch?

Before you answer: I meant ALWAYS DISCONNECT THE SPARKPLUG BEFORE SERVICING A LAWNMOWER.  ALWAYS.
 
2014-07-02 06:31:06 PM

Al!: MBrady: Al!: Mugato: ajgeek: but the fact that safety features don't exist on some of these machines (I'm talking real safety features, not "let's put a symbolic strip of piss poor steel here")

Well when you let go of the mower, the blades stop. If you need more of a safety feature than that, it's between you, Darwin and God.

To piggyback on what ManateeGag said:

I was about 11 (1990ish) and had been told to never, ever reach underneath the mower unless it had been properly "disarmed," lest I be disarmed myself.  I was mowing the neighbors yard and his yard grew unevenly.  The front and sides got lots of sun, the back lots of shade, thus leaving the front and sides growing slowly and the back a jungle if it ever went a week or more during the summer.  I was mowing the back and the blades bogged down enough that the mower stopped.  My normal method of clearing it was to rock the mower back and drop it hard to shake the grass out.  When that didn't work, I let go of the deadman switch, tilted the mower back to allow easier access, and right as I reached down to free the giant clump of grass the mower kicked to life for one entire stroke.  Had I been 2 seconds faster reaching in there I would be typing this with only my right hand.  Instead I learned a valuable lesson: don't ever trust a safety feature when you know a safer method.

Actually safety advocates say that you should pull the spark plug cap to make sure the mower (or snowblower) won't start up.

What exactly did you think I meant when I said the mower needed to be "disarmed" and that I knew a safer method than relying on the deadman switch?

Before you answer: I meant ALWAYS DISCONNECT THE SPARKPLUG BEFORE SERVICING A LAWNMOWER.  ALWAYS.


You'll have to forgive my ignorance, but what benefit do you get from disconnecting the sparkplug?

Do gas lawn mowers still use magnetos?
 
Al!
2014-07-02 08:49:54 PM

The Larch: Al!: MBrady: Al!: Mugato: ajgeek: but the fact that safety features don't exist on some of these machines (I'm talking real safety features, not "let's put a symbolic strip of piss poor steel here")

Well when you let go of the mower, the blades stop. If you need more of a safety feature than that, it's between you, Darwin and God.

To piggyback on what ManateeGag said:

I was about 11 (1990ish) and had been told to never, ever reach underneath the mower unless it had been properly "disarmed," lest I be disarmed myself.  I was mowing the neighbors yard and his yard grew unevenly.  The front and sides got lots of sun, the back lots of shade, thus leaving the front and sides growing slowly and the back a jungle if it ever went a week or more during the summer.  I was mowing the back and the blades bogged down enough that the mower stopped.  My normal method of clearing it was to rock the mower back and drop it hard to shake the grass out.  When that didn't work, I let go of the deadman switch, tilted the mower back to allow easier access, and right as I reached down to free the giant clump of grass the mower kicked to life for one entire stroke.  Had I been 2 seconds faster reaching in there I would be typing this with only my right hand.  Instead I learned a valuable lesson: don't ever trust a safety feature when you know a safer method.

Actually safety advocates say that you should pull the spark plug cap to make sure the mower (or snowblower) won't start up.

What exactly did you think I meant when I said the mower needed to be "disarmed" and that I knew a safer method than relying on the deadman switch?

Before you answer: I meant ALWAYS DISCONNECT THE SPARKPLUG BEFORE SERVICING A LAWNMOWER.  ALWAYS.

You'll have to forgive my ignorance, but what benefit do you get from disconnecting the sparkplug?

Do gas lawn mowers still use magnetos?


I think, by the nature of the system, they would have to use a magneto.  They don't have a battery and they aren't connected to an electrical power source, so the only other way for the sparkplug to achieve the spark needed to ignite the fuel to start the mower would be for a PMG to be connected somehow to the rotating mechanism of the mower.

I don't know for sure, and I'm not going to look it up, but I would imagine they would have to.
 
2014-07-02 09:19:07 PM

Al!


I think, by the nature of the system, they would have to use a magneto. They don't have a battery and they aren't connected to an electrical power source, so the only other way for the sparkplug to achieve the spark needed to ignite the fuel to start the mower would be for a PMG to be connected somehow to the rotating mechanism of the mower.

I don't know for sure, and I'm not going to look it up, but I would imagine they would have to.


Yes, they use a magneto. In a lot of cases the flywheel will be made of aluminum and will have a magnet embedded therein (and cast fins for moving air). If you remove the shroud - the sheet-metal cover with the pull-start rope - you'll be able to see the magnet and the other part that is stationary.
 
2014-07-02 11:27:07 PM

12349876: If it's not a riding, just lift it up and let it bang on the ground a few times.  That should usually get it, unless it's REALLY high or wet.


That's what she said?
 
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