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(National Post)   How Canadian English developed from mishmash of dialects and linguistic quirks, and apparently "eh" is fading away in favour of "right"   (news.nationalpost.com) divider line 70
    More: Obvious, Canadians, English dialects, first languages, American English, dialects, Presbyterian  
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2129 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Jun 2014 at 2:17 AM (9 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



70 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-06-30 01:37:28 AM
Right buddy?
 
2014-06-30 02:24:18 AM
So I've been watching Chopped Canada on Food Network and while they are really much nicer to each other as competitors and judges, the food also appears to be much blander.
 
2014-06-30 02:30:11 AM

BadReligion: Right buddy?


I'm not yer buddy, pal.
 
2014-06-30 02:36:47 AM

antron: BadReligion: Right buddy?

I'm not yer buddy, pal.


I'm not your pal, guy.
 
2014-06-30 03:01:06 AM

BadReligion: antron: BadReligion: Right buddy?

I'm not yer buddy, pal.

I'm not your pal, guy.


I'm not your guy, friend.
 
2014-06-30 03:25:25 AM

Flappyhead: BadReligion: antron: BadReligion: Right buddy?

I'm not yer buddy, pal.

I'm not your pal, guy.

I'm not your guy, friend.


I'm not your friend, amigo.
 
2014-06-30 03:31:49 AM

highwayrun: So I've been watching Chopped Canada on Food Network and while they are really much nicer to each other as competitors and judges, the food also appears to be much blander.


Tried that one. I don't like the host, for some reason.
 
2014-06-30 03:52:18 AM
When did Bill Cosby become Canadian?
 
2014-06-30 04:00:22 AM

max_pooper: Flappyhead: BadReligion: antron: BadReligion: Right buddy?

I'm not yer buddy, pal.

I'm not your pal, guy.

I'm not your guy, friend.

I'm not your friend, amigo.


I'm not your amigo, mon ami.
 
2014-06-30 04:04:16 AM

Flappyhead: BadReligion: antron: BadReligion: Right buddy?

I'm not yer buddy, pal.

I'm not your pal, guy.

I'm not your guy, friend.



i.imgur.com
I'm your Buddy Guy
 
2014-06-30 04:11:17 AM

fusillade762: highwayrun: So I've been watching Chopped Canada on Food Network and while they are really much nicer to each other as competitors and judges, the food also appears to be much blander.

Tried that one. I don't like the host, for some reason.


My sister is disturbed by him.   She also has an issue with the host of Kitchen Casino, but she has a point about them chompers.  The host of Cutthroat Kitchen should be elevated to Awesome Spy or something like that.  He is seriously twisted.

/good cook, though
 
2014-06-30 04:31:55 AM

Rixel: fusillade762: highwayrun: So I've been watching Chopped Canada on Food Network and while they are really much nicer to each other as competitors and judges, the food also appears to be much blander.

Tried that one. I don't like the host, for some reason.

My sister is disturbed by him.   She also has an issue with the host of Kitchen Casino, but she has a point about them chompers.  The host of Cutthroat Kitchen should be elevated to Awesome Spy or something like that.  He is seriously twisted.

/good cook, though


Isn't Cutthroat Kitchen hosted by Alton Brown? He's awesome. The show still looks too gimmicky for me to watch, though.
 
2014-06-30 04:32:08 AM
i611.photobucket.com
Word.
 
2014-06-30 05:31:55 AM
I was thinking about how we often have many words for  each thing.  Sandwich, sub, grinder. We should be able to just dump additional words and expand our vocabularies into rudimentary polyglotism. Anyhow, I'm told you only need about a thousand words to get started in a language, so now I'm thinking a word a day calendar with an english root and three or four other languages might be a product.

Heck, even if it's not effective I bet I could sell ten thousand units a year.
 
2014-06-30 05:40:06 AM

wildcardjack: I was thinking about how we often have many words for  each thing.  Sandwich, sub, grinder. We should be able to just dump additional words and expand our vocabularies into rudimentary polyglotism. Anyhow, I'm told you only need about a thousand words to get started in a language, so now I'm thinking a word a day calendar with an english root and three or four other languages might be a product.

Heck, even if it's not effective I bet I could sell ten thousand units a year.


You have to practice a language to speak it. By the time you're two months into this calender, you'll have forgotten early stuff.
But you could probably sell 10,000 units a year.
 
2014-06-30 05:49:00 AM
Offtopic, but how did "mishmosh" get turned into "mishmash?" Does the "mash' part make more sense to Western speakers? Like you're "mashing" words/people/ideologies?

/Yes I know, deep thoughts
//I do my best thinking on the bus
 
2014-06-30 05:56:34 AM

wildcardjack: I was thinking about how we often have many words for  each thing.  Sandwich, sub, grinder. We should be able to just dump additional words and expand our vocabularies into rudimentary polyglotism. Anyhow, I'm told you only need about a thousand words to get started in a language, so now I'm thinking a word a day calendar with an english root and three or four other languages might be a product.

Heck, even if it's not effective I bet I could sell ten thousand units a year.


You made me wonder how many words there are in Esperanto, so I was skimming the wikipedia page and it didn't say, but there are 900 roots used to make words and interestingly enough you can just make up words as you go ("This process is regular, so that people can create new words as they speak and be understood.")

There are supposedly somewhere between 100,000 and 2 million fluent speakers including some who speak it as a first language.

So you could probably sell a few.  I think you need a gimmick though.
 
2014-06-30 05:57:18 AM

Snapper Carr: Flappyhead: BadReligion: antron: BadReligion: Right buddy?

I'm not yer buddy, pal.

I'm not your pal, guy.

I'm not your guy, friend.


[i.imgur.com image 660x440]
I'm your Buddy Guy


C-C-C-C-Combo Breaker!
 
2014-06-30 05:59:46 AM
Right?

/When did that all of a sudden become a question?
 
2014-06-30 06:00:26 AM

RussianPooper: Right?

/When did that all of a sudden become a question?


When you missed the left 3 streets back.

/duh
 
2014-06-30 06:14:09 AM

highwayrun: So I've been watching Chopped Canada on Food Network and while they are really much nicer to each other as competitors and judges, the food also appears to be much blander blender.


Pet peave, eh? (I mean, right?)
/Sorry, just being an @$$hole this morning. Cheers!
 
2014-06-30 06:26:24 AM

starsrift: wildcardjack: I was thinking about how we often have many words for  each thing.  Sandwich, sub, grinder. We should be able to just dump additional words and expand our vocabularies into rudimentary polyglotism. Anyhow, I'm told you only need about a thousand words to get started in a language, so now I'm thinking a word a day calendar with an english root and three or four other languages might be a product.

Heck, even if it's not effective I bet I could sell ten thousand units a year.

You have to practice a language to speak it. By the time you're two months into this calender, you'll have forgotten early stuff.
But you could probably sell 10,000 units a year.


gfid: wildcardjack: yada yada

You made me wonder how many words there are in Esperanto, so I was skimming the wikipedia page and it didn't say, but there are 900 roots used to make words and interestingly enough you can just make up words as you go ("This process is regular, so that people can create new words as they speak and be understood.")

There are supposedly somewhere between 100,000 and 2 million fluent speakers including some who speak it as a first language.

So you could probably sell a few.  I think you need a gimmick though.


Well, how effective do you thing a word-a-day calendar is? Those gimmicks have been around for years, and I just need to have 365 entries ready. I just need to find out how much the calendar companies pay to see if it's worth my time.
 
2014-06-30 06:36:41 AM

wildcardjack: Well, how effective do you thing a word-a-day calendar is? Those gimmicks have been around for years, and I just need to have 365 entries ready. I just need to find out how much the calendar companies pay to see if it's worth my time.


Probably not effective unless you're learning the language at the same time.  If you made up grammar and verbs (including tenses and conjugations) maybe you could convince a site like duolingo to let you write lessons for it.
 
2014-06-30 06:39:28 AM

whidbey: Offtopic, but how did "mishmosh" get turned into "mishmash?" Does the "mash' part make more sense to Western speakers? Like you're "mashing" words/people/ideologies?

/Yes I know, deep thoughts
//I do my best thinking on the bus


When was it ever mishmosh?

mishmash (n.)
alsomish-mash, mid-15c.,mysse-masche, probably an imitative reduplication

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=mishmash

No matching terms found. is what comes up for mishmosh.
 
2014-06-30 06:54:01 AM

gfid: wildcardjack: Well, how effective do you thing a word-a-day calendar is? Those gimmicks have been around for years, and I just need to have 365 entries ready. I just need to find out how much the calendar companies pay to see if it's worth my time.

Probably not effective unless you're learning the language at the same time.  If you made up grammar and verbs (including tenses and conjugations) maybe you could convince a site like duolingo to let you write lessons for it.


Ughh, that sounds too much like work. It's much easier to convince people I'm a Nigerian prince who needs somebody to cash checks that later turn out to be bogus.
 
2014-06-30 07:25:16 AM

gfid: whidbey: Offtopic, but how did "mishmosh" get turned into "mishmash?" Does the "mash' part make more sense to Western speakers? Like you're "mashing" words/people/ideologies?

/Yes I know, deep thoughts
//I do my best thinking on the bus

When was it ever mishmosh?

mishmash (n.)
alsomish-mash, mid-15c.,mysse-masche, probably an imitative reduplication

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=mishmash

No matching terms found. is what comes up for mishmosh.


Thanks for putting the kibosch on his authentic frontier gibberish.
 
2014-06-30 07:43:51 AM
We wanted to sound British, which is one reason we don't sound American

Oh yes you do...

I'm not sure how many people outside North America can reliably tell the difference - I know I can't.
 
2014-06-30 07:52:18 AM
A major feature that distinguishes Canadian from other English dialects is its unique set of syntactic, phonological, and vocabular elements which exist solely for use in packaging sanctimonious and passive-aggressive sentiments in otherwise anodyne expressions.
 
2014-06-30 08:26:32 AM

Snapper Carr: Flappyhead: BadReligion: antron: BadReligion: Right buddy?

I'm not yer buddy, pal.

I'm not your pal, guy.

I'm not your guy, friend.


[i.imgur.com image 660x440]
I'm your Buddy Guy


upload.wikimedia.org
But is your Buddy Rich?
 
2014-06-30 08:27:16 AM
I'll just pop in here to point out that Professor Tagliamonte has a certain g/milfy quality about herself. I'd definitely like to explore ... linguistics with her.
 
2014-06-30 09:13:43 AM
I was once on the subway in Boston and two British guys were talking. One of them said, "What say hawhmm whaha hoo hee ha ho hoo hah?" The other one said, "What?" and the first one said in clear, unaccented English, "I said, 'What say we go to the pub after work for a beer?'" The second one said, "Oh! Ha hoo wha hmm ha hoo wa ha." The first one said, "What?" and the second one said, again in perfectly understandable English, "I said, 'Jolly good show! By all means, my good chap.'" And so the conversation went. Moral of the story: There is no such thing as an English accent. It's completely a show they put on to keep us norteamericanos confused. When they're alone, they talk just like you and me.
 
2014-06-30 09:26:05 AM
So you know how they named their country Canada?

There were two guys and they decided to pick letters out of a hat. So the one guy reaches in and pulls out a C.

"So what did you get?" asks the second guy

"C, eh."

"Ok keep pulling letters, buddy"

"N, eh"

"Ok, that's still a little short. Pull some more"

"D, eh"

"Canada? sounds good, eh."
 
2014-06-30 09:37:55 AM

Robo Beat: A major feature that distinguishes Canadian from other English dialects is its unique set of syntactic, phonological, and vocabular elements which exist solely for use in packaging sanctimonious and passive-aggressive sentiments in otherwise anodyne expressions.


Sorry?
 
2014-06-30 09:38:50 AM

RussianPooper: Right?

/When did that all of a sudden become a question?


When someone responds to a statement with "I know, right?", rupturing their skull with the nearest available blunt object should be considered justified homicide.
 
2014-06-30 09:40:16 AM
I noticed that west coasters (those from BC and Alberta) say "hey" instead of "eh."
I don't notice when someone says "eh" but I definitely notice the "hey."
 
2014-06-30 09:41:25 AM
Bob!
 
2014-06-30 09:51:49 AM

cgraves67: RussianPooper: Right?

/When did that all of a sudden become a question?

When someone responds to a statement with "I know, right?", rupturing their skull with the nearest available blunt object should be considered justified homicide.


I know, right?
 
2014-06-30 09:59:32 AM

Bedstead Polisher: I noticed that west coasters (those from BC and Alberta) say "hey" instead of "eh."
I don't notice when someone says "eh" but I definitely notice the "hey."


I've gotten into the habit of sometimes ending my sentences with "hey" instead of "eh." It's like "a" and "an."
 
2014-06-30 10:06:05 AM

cgraves67: RussianPooper: Right?

/When did that all of a sudden become a question?

When someone responds to a statement with "I know, right?", rupturing their skull with the nearest available blunt object should be considered justified homicide.


They leave off the "I know" part around here.

"That was a really good meal!"
"Right?"
 
2014-06-30 11:41:16 AM
That was quite a long article for having said so little, eh?
 
2014-06-30 11:55:39 AM

SansNeural: That was quite a long article for having said so little, eh?


I know, right?
 
2014-06-30 12:52:53 PM
apparently-eh-is-fading-away-in-favour-of-right
Yeah, right.
 
2014-06-30 01:11:50 PM

Peki: max_pooper: Flappyhead: BadReligion: antron: BadReligion: Right buddy?

I'm not yer buddy, pal.

I'm not your pal, guy.

I'm not your guy, friend.

I'm not your friend, amigo.

I'm not your amigo, mon ami.


I'm not your ami, bub
 
2014-06-30 01:19:17 PM
Until the early 1900s English-speaking Canadians were, as a generalization, Anglophiles. Grasping their teacups, portraits of the Queen and, quite often, their British accents, as cultural identifiers and status symbols.

upload.wikimedia.org
No, not that queen, this one
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-06-30 01:27:53 PM

cgraves67: RussianPooper: Right?

/When did that all of a sudden become a question?

When someone responds to a statement with "I know, right?", rupturing their skull with the nearest available blunt object should be considered justified homicide.


Its a perfectly fine usage of language. Its a colloquial way of exclaiming agreement. But by all means, wank on about proper use of grammar in the dramatic and plastic English language. Nobody ever gets irritated at pedantic nitpickers like that...

Redonkulous  -- now there is a word that deserves violence.
 
2014-06-30 01:32:00 PM
I find a few english spellings are different between American and Canadian English, but thanks to teh internetz and Microsoft Word, Canadian spellings are disappearing.

'ou' instead of 'o'. Colour, armour.
're' instead of 'er' (Canadians use both) metre = unit of measurement, meter = something that measures something; centre = a building, center = middle of something'
'grey' instead 'gray' (GREY CUP!!!!)
z = ZED instead of ZEE for pronunciation.

There are a bunch of others, but those are the standouts.
 
2014-06-30 01:43:44 PM

mikefinch: cgraves67: RussianPooper: Right?

/When did that all of a sudden become a question?

When someone responds to a statement with "I know, right?", rupturing their skull with the nearest available blunt object should be considered justified homicide.

Its a perfectly fine usage of language. Its a colloquial way of exclaiming agreement. But by all means, wank on about proper use of grammar in the dramatic and plastic English language. Nobody ever gets irritated at pedantic nitpickers like that...

Redonkulous  -- now there is a word that deserves violence.


It's not even about grammar. They are asking you to confirm that they know what you said previously is correct! How can that be equivalent to saying "I agree" or "That's true"? It just doesn't make any sense as a response, and therefore the person isn't paying attention to what you are talking about. You're wasting your time conversing with an idiot.
 
2014-06-30 01:47:22 PM
Pop. One drinks it.
 
2014-06-30 01:55:26 PM
ScottyP agrees, nahmsayin', hehehehe
 
2014-06-30 02:18:36 PM

mikefinch: cgraves67: RussianPooper: Right?

/When did that all of a sudden become a question?

When someone responds to a statement with "I know, right?", rupturing their skull with the nearest available blunt object should be considered justified homicide.

Its a perfectly fine usage of language. Its a colloquial way of exclaiming agreement. But by all means, wank on about proper use of grammar in the dramatic and plastic English language. Nobody ever gets irritated at pedantic nitpickers like that...

Redonkulous  -- now there is a word that deserves violence.


Drinking buddy of mine used to say: "ree-cock-ulous!"
 
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