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(LA Times)   FDA approves inhaler for insulin. That's one small step for man, one giant leap for MannKind   (latimes.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, FDA, Mannkind Corp.  
•       •       •

2440 clicks; posted to Business » on 28 Jun 2014 at 4:51 PM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-28 03:24:36 PM  
...got the OK on Friday to sell the drug called Afrezza

I would have went with 'Insulung'.
 
2014-06-28 04:53:40 PM  
Life Extender Machine still in development.
 
2014-06-28 04:57:05 PM  
Eh.  Call me when they can 3D print a new pancreas.

/Liver too please
 
2014-06-28 04:58:18 PM  
i58.tinypic.com
 
2014-06-28 05:00:34 PM  
I heard you can smoke weed in those too, they should be banned.
 
2014-06-28 05:03:40 PM  

bearded clamorer: ...got the OK on Friday to sell the drug called Afrezza

I would have went with 'Insulung'.


Only if you can get Jethro Tull to come up with the music for the inevitable marketing campaign.
 
2014-06-28 05:08:21 PM  
What using an inhaler might look like...

www.ivillage.ca
 
2014-06-28 05:10:06 PM  
i.imgur.com

Have a nice day
 
2014-06-28 05:10:26 PM  
Can it give doses in the .025 unit range? until it can, I'll keep my pump.
 
2014-06-28 05:11:11 PM  

dolphinsgonwild: What using an inhaler might look like...

[www.ivillage.ca image 623x467]


Come on lady, it's not gonna inhale itself!
 
2014-06-28 05:14:24 PM  
It's been a long, expensive journey to get Afrezza to this stage. MannKind has spent about $1.8 billion developing the drug, with about $975 million of that coming from Mann's personal wealth.

Hero tag caught napping?
 
2014-06-28 05:18:38 PM  

Anastacya: bearded clamorer: ...got the OK on Friday to sell the drug called Afrezza

I would have went with 'Insulung'.

Only if you can get Jethro Tull to come up with the music for the inevitable marketing campaign.


♫ Sitting on the park bench...
Eyeing little cakes with bad intent...
Insuluuuung ♫
 
2014-06-28 05:24:47 PM  

dolphinsgonwild: dolphinsgonwild: What using an inhaler might look like...

[www.ivillage.ca image 623x467]

Come on lady, it's not gonna inhale itself!


How many times have I said that? Good times.
 
2014-06-28 05:27:36 PM  
So now I can inhale doughnuts!!!
 
2014-06-28 05:27:52 PM  
This is what billionaires should be doing with their money,and yes I recognize he will probably make bucks but he has improved the lives of a ton of people instead of buying another yacht.
 
2014-06-28 05:31:55 PM  
It's one small step for a man, subby.  Goddammit, you only had one chance to get that right and you FARKED IT UP!
 
2014-06-28 05:31:58 PM  

dolphinsgonwild: What using an inhaler might look like...

[www.ivillage.ca image 623x467]


Well, if that's the face of diabeetus......well I've got an "inhaler" for her, alright.  And it's zimbomba63 approved, too!

/
 
2014-06-28 05:39:22 PM  
Donut

*puff*

Donut

*puff*

Donut

*puff*

Donut

*puff*
 
2014-06-28 05:41:34 PM  

The_Original_Roxtar: Can it give doses in the .025 unit range? until it can, I'll keep my pump.


Yeah.  This.

/MM723
 
2014-06-28 05:43:28 PM  
Fear of needles is the only thing keeping me healthy.  Now I can let myself go and get the diabeetus and just inhale the medicine.
 
2014-06-28 05:47:48 PM  
img.fark.net
 
2014-06-28 05:48:08 PM  
"Maybe in order to understand mankind, we have to look at the word itself: 'Mankind'. Basically, it's made up of two separate words - 'mank' and 'ind'. What do these words mean? It's a mystery, and that's why so is mankind." - So-crates.
 
2014-06-28 05:51:08 PM  

Xanlexian: The_Original_Roxtar: Can it give doses in the .025 unit range? until it can, I'll keep my pump.

Yeah.  This.

/MM723


I must have amazingly bad resistance, Typical meal for me is about 40 units of Humalog. I'd be worried about drowning from the powder. I assume this is only short acting and not something like Lantis.

I don't really understand the advantages of a pump, you are just trading multiple injections for a permanent injection site / higher possibility of infections yes?

Type 1 for 23 years now.
 
2014-06-28 05:54:43 PM  

Xanlexian: The_Original_Roxtar: Can it give doses in the .025 unit range? until it can, I'll keep my pump.

Yeah.  This.

/MM723


/mm551 here.
//enlite sensors are so much better than the old ones.
 
2014-06-28 06:00:18 PM  

lifeboat: It's one small step for a man, subby.  Goddammit, you only had one chance to get that right and you FARKED IT UP!


from: http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Neil_Armstrong

"In the actual sound recordings he apparently fails to say "a" before "man" and says: "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." This was generally considered by many to simply be an error of omission on his part. Armstrong long insisted he did say "a man" but that it was inaudible. Prior to new evidence supporting his claim, he stated a preference for the "a" to appear in parentheses when the quote is written....The debate continues, as reports that more recent analysis by linguist John Olsson and author Chris riley with higher quality recordings indicates that Armstrong did NOT say "a"."
 
2014-06-28 06:04:11 PM  

jeffdo1: Xanlexian: The_Original_Roxtar: Can it give doses in the .025 unit range? until it can, I'll keep my pump.

Yeah.  This.

/MM723

I must have amazingly bad resistance, Typical meal for me is about 40 units of Humalog. I'd be worried about drowning from the powder. I assume this is only short acting and not something like Lantis.

I don't really understand the advantages of a pump, you are just trading multiple injections for a permanent injection site / higher possibility of infections yes?

Type 1 for 23 years now.


I use ~ 30-40 units per day.
the infusion site isn't permanent, you move it every 3 days. I have 12 sites that I rotate through.
risk of infection might actually be lower since you're sticking yourself fewer times.
the main reason I like mine are as follows:
1: I only have to buy 1 type of insulin (ever given yourself your long-acting shot out of the wrong vial? I have. scary stuff)
2: I don't have to carry as much stuff with me. i have my testing stuff in my pocket and my pump on my belt. no more syringes/vials/alcohol swabs being taken everywhere
3: build in cgm with the medtronic unit. if I start to drop low over night, it wakes me up. it lets me know if i'm going low when i'm driving, or riding my motorcycle, or just out walking around. I don't have to wait until things feel "wrong" before knowing that I need to fix the situation.
4: flexibility. Want to work out? turn the basal insulin off so you don't go low. you can't take your Lantus out of your blood once it's in there. Eating something high in carbs, but slow to absorb like Pizza? configure the pump to deliver your meal bolus over the course of an hour instead of all at once.
 
2014-06-28 06:07:07 PM  

jeffdo1: Xanlexian: The_Original_Roxtar: Can it give doses in the .025 unit range? until it can, I'll keep my pump.

Yeah.  This.

/MM723

I must have amazingly bad resistance, Typical meal for me is about 40 units of Humalog. I'd be worried about drowning from the powder. I assume this is only short acting and not something like Lantis.

I don't really understand the advantages of a pump, you are just trading multiple injections for a permanent injection site / higher possibility of infections yes?

Type 1 for 23 years now.



I've only been a T1 now for just over 9 years.  I was DX'd at age 32.  Since about 2 months after DX, I was doing 8-12x injections in a 24hour period.  The pump has allowed me to stop with injections altogether (mostly), go from 2 insulins to 1 (no longer need Lantus), and I have 7 basal profiles that automatically go off at different times.  The pump has been an absolute wonder for me.  I still have to test 8+ times a day, though.

The cannula ('injection site'/infusion site) stays in for 2-3 days, then you remove it, put in a new on (on the other side of your body), refill the pump with insulin (300u in my case), and not worry about an injection for 2-3 more days.

I know I can keep an open insulin vial on the counter, since it'd get used way quicker than it'd expire/go bad -- but I still always keep the insulin in the fridge.  After filling a syringe, I got in the habit of putting the filled syringe behind my ear (like a pencil) to warm it up a bit before I inject it.  -- I've answered my door, I've been in a hotel where I walked to the front desk for something, I've sat in a restaurant after filling a syringe and having it openly sitting behind my ear.  With an insulin pump, my own absent-mindedness doesn't make me outwardly appear to be a druggie. :)

Love my pump.
 
2014-06-28 06:09:03 PM  

The_Original_Roxtar: jeffdo1: Xanlexian: The_Original_Roxtar: Can it give doses in the .025 unit range? until it can, I'll keep my pump.

Yeah.  This.

/MM723

I must have amazingly bad resistance, Typical meal for me is about 40 units of Humalog. I'd be worried about drowning from the powder. I assume this is only short acting and not something like Lantis.

I don't really understand the advantages of a pump, you are just trading multiple injections for a permanent injection site / higher possibility of infections yes?

Type 1 for 23 years now.

I use ~ 30-40 units per day.
the infusion site isn't permanent, you move it every 3 days. I have 12 sites that I rotate through.
risk of infection might actually be lower since you're sticking yourself fewer times.
the main reason I like mine are as follows:
1: I only have to buy 1 type of insulin (ever given yourself your long-acting shot out of the wrong vial? I have. scary stuff)
2: I don't have to carry as much stuff with me. i have my testing stuff in my pocket and my pump on my belt. no more syringes/vials/alcohol swabs being taken everywhere
3: build in cgm with the medtronic unit. if I start to drop low over night, it wakes me up. it lets me know if i'm going low when i'm driving, or riding my motorcycle, or just out walking around. I don't have to wait until things feel "wrong" before knowing that I need to fix the situation.
4: flexibility. Want to work out? turn the basal insulin off so you don't go low. you can't take your Lantus out of your blood once it's in there. Eating something high in carbs, but slow to absorb like Pizza? configure the pump to deliver your meal bolus over the course of an hour instead of all at once.


Again... all of this!!
 
2014-06-28 06:10:32 PM  
Recently diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes, taking pills for now. Doctor says I am making too much insulin. I am morbidly obese so the weight needs to come off. I am still learning about this condition but I am glad they have easier ways of taking insulin, if it comes to that.
 
2014-06-28 06:10:38 PM  

jeffdo1: Xanlexian: The_Original_Roxtar: Can it give doses in the .025 unit range? until it can, I'll keep my pump.

Yeah.  This.

/MM723

I must have amazingly bad resistance, Typical meal for me is about 40 units of Humalog. I'd be worried about drowning from the powder. I assume this is only short acting and not something like Lantis.

I don't really understand the advantages of a pump, you are just trading multiple injections for a permanent injection site / higher possibility of infections yes?

Type 1 for 23 years now.


No.  You're trading consistent small hits of short-acting insulin for infrequent larger hits of long-acting.  This lessens the risk of lows.  For those who don't recognize lows very well, this is very important.  For meals, you're still taking a bolus of fast-acting, just like you typically would with normal injections.  You also get better control of the basal levels, you can have one for day and one for night (or however many different parts of the day you have different needs).  Much better control is possible compared to using long-acting insulins.  I'm not a type I, but have lived with one for more than 20 years, 15 of those with the pump.  In the 15, I've had to help her recover from lows fewer times than I did in the 5.
 
2014-06-28 06:11:31 PM  

I think that any thread that mentions the FDA should also mention Frances Oldham Kelsey, the hero that prevented a lot of malformed babbies in the US.

upload.wikimedia.org

Frances Kathleen Oldham Kelsey, Ph.D., M.D., (born 24 July 1914) is a pharmacologist, most famous as the reviewer for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) who refused to authorize thalidomide for market because she had concerns about the drug's safety. Her concerns proved to be justified when it was proven that thalidomide caused serious birth defects. Kelsey's career intersected with the passage of laws strengthening the FDA's oversight of pharmaceuticals.

As nations around the world approved the use of thalidomide, she held out against the commercial interests pushing for its approval. We all know the rest of the story, right? In nations that rubber-stamped thalidomide's approval, it was prescribed as a treatment for morning sickness. Those nations had a not insignificant increase in birth defects. The USA did not.

/But carry on raging about government interfering in your lives, tards.
//Only shareholders have votes in publicly traded companies.
 
2014-06-28 07:06:14 PM  

Whatchoo Talkinbout: It's been a long, expensive journey to get Afrezza to this stage. MannKind has spent about $1.8 billion developing the drug, with about $975 million of that coming from Mann's personal wealth.

Hero tag caught napping?


"Mortimer, I'll bet you one billion dollars that I can defy the FDA."

....and he did it using only $975,000,000.

Ego. It's costs some people A LOTS of money.
 
2014-06-28 07:35:48 PM  

bearded clamorer: ...got the OK on Friday to sell the drug called Afrezza

I would have went with 'Insulung'.


They already have that, it's called Asbestos
 
2014-06-28 07:42:12 PM  
They had an inhaler for insulin out several years ago but it only gave a couple units at a time and was relatively cumbersome to use. I don't know how they are going to get around the hyperplasia issue though, but I wish them he best if luck.
 
2014-06-28 07:55:12 PM  
My husband works at this company and has been talking about this for a while.  It's not just insulin, it's mounted on some kind of nanotechnology that releases it as soon as it makes contact with the lungs.  Or some crazy high tech stuff.  Very cool innovation, they are very excited about it.  Hope it helps people.
 
2014-06-28 09:39:41 PM  

The Googles Do Nothing: Fear of needles is the only thing keeping me healthy.  Now I can let myself go and get the diabeetus and just inhale the medicine.


The needles are so small and thin that you don't even feel them and have to be looking at them to tell they have gone in.

I would be worried about what this will do to lung tissue before using it.   From what I read it's intended only as an emergency dose one can carry around and does not replace regular insulin injections.
 
2014-06-28 11:40:33 PM  
Mann kind

media.steampowered.com
 
2014-06-29 07:31:10 AM  
Instead of this, I would have rather this guy spent his money backing the development of bioengineered or gene therapy artificial pancreas
 
2014-06-29 08:53:12 AM  

Whatchoo Talkinbout: It's been a long, expensive journey to get Afrezza to this stage. MannKind has spent about $1.8 billion developing the drug, with about $975 million of that coming from Mann's personal wealth.

Hero tag caught napping?


Unless Mann plans on giving it for free he is an evil corporate whore looking to make money off the lives of poor people. Government should force him to sell each inhaler at only a dollar.
 
2014-06-29 12:24:17 PM  
For all those ignorant farkers out there, you do realize that type 1 diabetes is caused by an infection and type 2 is caused by other things aside from poor diet.
 
2014-06-29 12:34:57 PM  

bearwife: My husband works at this company and has been talking about this for a while.  It's not just insulin, it's mounted on some kind of nanotechnology that releases it as soon as it makes contact with the lungs.  Or some crazy high tech stuff.  Very cool innovation, they are very excited about it.  Hope it helps people.


make sure he gets some kicks out of these replies!

i've been a borderline type 2 for years but haven't gotten above the 110 or had a high enough a1c for any extended time to say that i am a type 2. both my parents are type 2, i'm sure the one grandmother i knew was a type 2. all my grandparents and parents were raised in the south.

i've been working out since june 2010 and while i could stand to lose another 20-25 to get to 180, i am 60 lbs down from when i started. going to do what i can to not fall into this group.

from what i've seen, i hope they can find a cure for type 1.
 
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