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(Entertainment Weekly)   Matt Lauer doesn't understand why people don't tolerate misogyny   (insidetv.ew.com ) divider line
    More: Dumbass, Matt Lauer, CEO Mary, CEO, American auto industry  
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6340 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 28 Jun 2014 at 12:33 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-27 11:00:37 PM  
Matt Lauer can suck it.
 
2014-06-28 12:37:20 AM  
"If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

Matt, you would NOT have asked a man the same question you lying sack of sh*t.
 
2014-06-28 12:39:23 AM  
Article states that a recent set of interviews with other CEOs....guys...had a focus on work/home time balance.

If true, then people need to calm the fark down and stop PMSing.
 
2014-06-28 12:41:28 AM  
What a stupid headline. The question of how women balance work and family is discussed constantly, by women, and he's supposed to ignore this when talking to a female CEO, after the question had been discussed recently in another article about her, due to a comment she herself made?

Maybe he should have ignored the issue. But his response here is reasonable, not "dumbass" and what he did wasn't "hatred of women."
 
2014-06-28 12:47:37 AM  

Surool: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

Matt, you would NOT have asked a man the same question you lying sack of sh*t.


Yeah, I was sorta wondering if he had ever asked a man that question in the past.
 
2014-06-28 12:48:30 AM  

Surool: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

Matt, you would NOT have asked a man the same question you lying sack of sh*t.


Why do you not believe him?

The 'something similar' was this female ceo opening the door by mentioning directly that her new job costs her in family life.

I would say it sexist to presume career oriented men don't make family sacrifices. Frankly while you may think it misogyny to ask the woman that question, I view it akin to someone saying it is racist against african americans to say they have big dicks. Sure it is stereotyping but hell it is a compliment.

I think that IF women consider their family more in these decisions then that is a plus in their column, not a negative.
 
2014-06-28 12:49:44 AM  

fusillade762: Surool: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

Matt, you would NOT have asked a man the same question you lying sack of sh*t.

Yeah, I was sorta wondering if he had ever asked a man that question in the past.


Had a man ever brought it up himself in a recent public interview?

If not then we would compare unlike circumstances.
 
2014-06-28 12:51:04 AM  
If you watch the Today show for any reason other than jacking it before work to Natalie Morales, your priorities are worse than even mine, which are deplorable.
 
2014-06-28 12:53:03 AM  
Men can grin and bear it. That's what we do.

What a luxury it must be to biatch and moan about making sacrifices.
 
2014-06-28 12:55:47 AM  

Infernalist: Article states that a recent set of interviews with other CEOs....guys...had a focus on work/home time balance.

If true, then people need to calm the fark down and stop PMSing.


FTA: "A couple weeks ago, we did a series on 'Modern Dads' and the challenges of fatherhood today. Work-life balance was one of our focuses."

What I see is that Lauer's acting like these are questions he's put to every CEO he interviews, which I strongly suspect is not the case.

If he'd added something to the effect of "work-life balance is a topic that our industry has underreported and we're trying to change that," then I can cut him some slack. But since he didn't say anything of the kind, I assume he's just trying to cover himself.
 
2014-06-28 01:06:43 AM  
miss her son's junior prom

That's what brought this out?  That's what brings your parenting skills into question?

Like if the son was found dead with a heroin needle in his arm, I'd get it.  But what did she miss? Taking a few pictures before the kids all jumped in a limo?  The horror.
 
2014-06-28 01:16:12 AM  

Jaden Smith First of His Name: If you watch the Today show for any reason other than jacking it before work to Natalie Morales, your priorities are worse than even mine, which are deplorable.


With the entire internet available at your fingertips, instantly, 24/7, you jack it to Natalie Morales? I don't know man, when I'm in the mood for something latin, I tend to go with Daniela Tamayo, but that's just me.
 
2014-06-28 01:28:24 AM  

PanicMan: miss her son's junior prom

That's what brought this out?  That's what brings your parenting skills into question?

Like if the son was found dead with a heroin needle in his arm, I'd get it.  But what did she miss? Taking a few pictures before the kids all jumped in a limo?  The horror.


Maybe, she was supposed to be his date and she stood him up
 
2014-06-28 01:39:13 AM  
I was ready to jump down Lauer's throat but he's right. See this interview with Obama where he speaks at length about parenting, though a hell of a lot more tactful http://www.today.com/id/28975726/ns/today-today_news/t/obama-were-suff ering-massive-hangover/
 
2014-06-28 01:42:00 AM  

fusillade762: Surool: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

Matt, you would NOT have asked a man the same question you lying sack of sh*t.

Yeah, I was sorta wondering if he had ever asked a man that question in the past.


What he really should do, is start asking that question doing forward.

It's a crying shame not that we ask women in high-level positions "Do you think you can be a good mom and still be CEO?" but that we DON'T ask men "Do you think you can be a good dad and still be CEO?" For too long, we've just assumed that men can in fact work 90 hours a week at high pressure jobs and still somehow be good parents and husbands, and I'm not convinced this is true.
 
2014-06-28 01:52:17 AM  
No man would have cried  in Forbes about missing his son's prom.
 
2014-06-28 01:53:29 AM  

Surool: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

Matt, you would NOT have asked a man the same question you lying sack of sh*t.


That^

Christian Bale: what he did wasn't "hatred of women."


I'll agree he wasn't saying it out of hatred. He said it because he is a dumbass.


Why does this question even need be asked? Of course balancing family life with a professional one will have its difficulties for anyone, regardless of gender.

Such a dumb question.
 
2014-06-28 02:00:47 AM  
Maybe it's been just bad luck for me, but in my 40 years of working experience women have been lousy managers.  Cheap, quick to rush to judgement, irrational,  unable to see the big picture,  envious and close-minded.  Some lost their position or were demoted.

One drove a late-model Buick but had a mouthful of rotten teeth.  Her breath nauseated me.  I guess she was scared of dentists.

Sorry, but I'd just rather work with male supervisors.  Nothing personal.
 
2014-06-28 02:08:12 AM  

Strongbeerrules: Maybe it's been just bad luck for me, but in my 40 years of working experience women have been lousy managers.  Cheap, quick to rush to judgement, irrational,  unable to see the big picture,  envious and close-minded.  Some lost their position or were demoted.

One drove a late-model Buick but had a mouthful of rotten teeth.  Her breath nauseated me.  I guess she was scared of dentists.

Sorry, but I'd just rather work with male supervisors.  Nothing personal.


I have had a mix of both.

Some of the worst bosses and supervisors I have had were women and some of the best ones I have had were women.

I think it really depends on the industry.

For instance, I worked as a receptionist for a marathon that took place in the city I lived in, for two weeks. The manager was a woman that would throw coffee mugs if she got pissed off.

Another time, I worked as a lab tech and research assistant and the scientists I was working under were awesome.

One shop, I had a groupd of guys I worked with that were all around great. Another, the foreman was a japanese girl that was passive aggressive and catty as all hells.

Everyone has the potential of being assholes, regardless of whats between their legs.
 
2014-06-28 02:23:57 AM  

chuklz: No man would have cried  in Forbes about missing his son's prom.


And if one did, the overwhelming response would be, "Who gives a fark?"
I'm wondering if women are cool with being treated with that kind of honesty.
 
2014-06-28 02:24:13 AM  
Some of you snowflakes will get mad at anything
 
2014-06-28 02:27:06 AM  

Gestankfaust: Some of you snowflakes will get mad at anything


TAKE THAT BACK RIGHT NOW!!
 
2014-06-28 02:28:19 AM  

Gyrfalcon: fusillade762: Surool: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

Matt, you would NOT have asked a man the same question you lying sack of sh*t.

Yeah, I was sorta wondering if he had ever asked a man that question in the past.

What he really should do, is start asking that question doing forward.

It's a crying shame not that we ask women in high-level positions "Do you think you can be a good mom and still be CEO?" but that we DON'T ask men "Do you think you can be a good dad and still be CEO?" For too long, we've just assumed that men can in fact work 90 hours a week at high pressure jobs and still somehow be good parents and husbands, and I'm not convinced this is true.


I think the issue is that we just have really low standards for what it means to be a good dad.  That is slowly changing as household responsibility and parenting are becoming more balanced between men and women.  However, as of now it's simply considered good if the guy is around at all in a lot of families.  The sad thing is I think there's still a lot of people who are okay with it being that way.

Personally I don't intend to have kids for a number of reasons, but one of them being that I don't want to be a single mom.  It's not that I'm single, it's just that my husband wouldn't be responsible.  He'd be a great dad in the sense that he's great with kids, fun to be around, and sensitive and all that.  But getting daily tasks done, keeping on schedule, and remembering things is not his strong suit.  When I told his mom this, she just told me that's the way it is for mothers and if you want kids, as a woman you'll have to get used to that idea.

This got me thinking a lot about how we define what it means to be a father in our culture.  Obviously it is going to vary from family to family with a lot of variables that impact it, but it does seem to be how it is in a lot of families, even if they don't see it that way.  I'm not trying to undervalue fathers by the way, I know there are plenty of good ones out there that are an active part of their kids' lives, but I don't think we're at the point yet where there is a shared balance of responsibilities (of course this only applies in households where both parents work - obviously stay-at-home parents should have more responsibility for the kids).  It's changing as more women work and more men stay at home or work from home, but do men even want that change?
 
2014-06-28 02:46:29 AM  

Gyrfalcon: fusillade762: Surool: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

Matt, you would NOT have asked a man the same question you lying sack of sh*t.

Yeah, I was sorta wondering if he had ever asked a man that question in the past.

What he really should do, is start asking that question doing forward.

It's a crying shame not that we ask women in high-level positions "Do you think you can be a good mom and still be CEO?" but that we DON'T ask men "Do you think you can be a good dad and still be CEO?" For too long, we've just assumed that men can in fact work 90 hours a week at high pressure jobs and still somehow be good parents and husbands, and I'm not convinced this is true.


They cannot. My dad did it (70 hrs plus lots of travel plus moving the family every few years). It sucked balls.
 
2014-06-28 02:57:21 AM  

Gyrfalcon: and I'm not convinced this is true.


And when you bring that up a lot of people just go "Well that's how the job is", it never occurs to them that maybe having anyone working those hours is insane.
 
2014-06-28 03:34:24 AM  

Czechzican: Surool: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

Matt, you would NOT have asked a man the same question you lying sack of sh*t.

That^

Christian Bale: what he did wasn't "hatred of women."

I'll agree he wasn't saying it out of hatred. He said it because he is a dumbass.


Why does this question even need be asked? Of course balancing family life with a professional one will have its difficulties for anyone, regardless of gender.

Such a dumb question.


Why?
Inspiration/advice to others are possibilities. I am sure there are other reasons.
 
2014-06-28 03:36:12 AM  

Strongbeerrules: Maybe it's been just bad luck for me, but in my 40 years of working experience women have been lousy managers.  Cheap, quick to rush to judgement, irrational,  unable to see the big picture,  envious and close-minded.  Some lost their position or were demoted.

One drove a late-model Buick but had a mouthful of rotten teeth.  Her breath nauseated me.  I guess she was scared of dentists.

Sorry, but I'd just rather work with male supervisors.  Nothing personal.


People who drive buicks and have bad teeth are the worst.

I am not a car guy. What does the buick have to do with it?
 
2014-06-28 03:49:48 AM  

Smackledorfer: Czechzican: Surool: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

Matt, you would NOT have asked a man the same question you lying sack of sh*t.

That^

Christian Bale: what he did wasn't "hatred of women."

I'll agree he wasn't saying it out of hatred. He said it because he is a dumbass.


Why does this question even need be asked? Of course balancing family life with a professional one will have its difficulties for anyone, regardless of gender.

Such a dumb question.

Why?
Inspiration/advice to others are possibilities. I am sure there are other reasons.


The very premise of it is dumb. In my eyes, it's akin to going up to Micheal Phelps and asking him if the water was wet during his time in the olympics.

Besides, it's not like the CEOs will ever say "It's impossible to work this job and raise a family. It can't be done." They are more than likely going to paint themselves in the most positive light about it. And also, when you are that high up in the ranks in a fortune 500 company, chances are you have a nanny and other staff to ease the burden and/or you're sending your kids to boarding school.
 
2014-06-28 04:07:23 AM  

PanicMan: miss her son's junior prom

That's what brought this out?  That's what brings your parenting skills into question?

Like if the son was found dead with a heroin needle in his arm, I'd get it.  But what did she miss? Taking a few pictures before the kids all jumped in a limo?  The horror.


Yeah, this was exactly my question. Missing the kid's graduation is one thing, but missing the pre-prom - junior prom, no less - snapshots? I'm sure the boy will be scarred for life.
 
2014-06-28 04:09:26 AM  

Czechzican: Smackledorfer: Czechzican: Surool: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

Matt, you would NOT have asked a man the same question you lying sack of sh*t.

That^

Christian Bale: what he did wasn't "hatred of women."

I'll agree he wasn't saying it out of hatred. He said it because he is a dumbass.


Why does this question even need be asked? Of course balancing family life with a professional one will have its difficulties for anyone, regardless of gender.

Such a dumb question.

Why?
Inspiration/advice to others are possibilities. I am sure there are other reasons.

The very premise of it is dumb. In my eyes, it's akin to going up to Micheal Phelps and asking him if the water was wet during his time in the olympics.

Besides, it's not like the CEOs will ever say "It's impossible to work this job and raise a family. It can't be done." They are more than likely going to paint themselves in the most positive light about it. And also, when you are that high up in the ranks in a fortune 500 company, chances are you have a nanny and other staff to ease the burden and/or you're sending your kids to boarding school.


Ok, don't watch his interviews.

You must be in a constant state of fury over the things that others find interesting or useful but you don't.
 
2014-06-28 04:27:35 AM  
Smackledorfer: You must be in a constant state of fury over the things that others find interesting or useful but you don't.


Absolutely.

You should see me in a restaurant when I ask the wait staff what they would recommend and they suggest something I dislike. Like kale.

My shirt gets torn off. Silverware goes flying. Dishes smashed. They get tossed over expo line and into the hapless sous chef. They'd be lucky if I leave them a 10% tip at the end.

Fury. Unbridled.
 
2014-06-28 04:46:21 AM  
he said "parent", not "mother".  get over it.
 
2014-06-28 04:58:53 AM  

stonelotus: he said "parent", not "mother"


Just curious how that makes any difference?
 
2014-06-28 05:13:24 AM  

Infernalist: Article states that a recent set of interviews with other CEOs....guys...had a focus on work/home time balance.

If true, then people need to calm the fark down and stop PMSing.


It's always best not to stick your dick in a hornets' nest. Just let the manufactured rage over this non-story play out, it won't be long until someone else says something wrong in a dream or something.
 
2014-06-28 05:34:23 AM  

PillsHere: It's changing as more women work and more men stay at home or work from home, but do men even want that change?


The men who want that change make it, and you never hear about them because they--like most women--don't become high-powered CEOs and politicians. It's just that they can't claim society is trying to keep them down or there's a glass ceiling or whatever. And they routinely have to take gibes about being "pussy-whipped" or "wearing the apron" when they want to skip out on a business junket to see the kids' soccer game or when they go home to have dinner with the family instead of working late.

It's very sad and very telling that asking a woman "Can you be a CEO and a good parent?" is considered a WRONG question to ask a woman--not that "Can you be a CEO and a good parent?" should be the RIGHT question to ask ANYONE.
 
2014-06-28 05:42:26 AM  

PillsHere: It's changing as more women work and more men stay at home or work from home, but do men even want that change?


My husband mostly stays at home these days.  He personally loves it, but it is something I just cannot tolerate.  The sad is, he's ashamed to talk about what he "does for a living" to the point of where he's cut off most of his family and social contacts.  Apparently everyone kept asking him if he's found any work yet or what kind of job he'd enjoy doing.  I wonder why he doesn't just tell them he's happy staying at home, but that's apparently something men aren't yet allowed to say.
 
2014-06-28 05:44:55 AM  

gadian: He personally loves it, but it is something I just cannot tolerate.


That might be misinterpreted.  I can't tolerate staying at home, I didn't mean that I can't tolerate him staying home.
 
2014-06-28 07:22:37 AM  

Infernalist: Article states that a recent set of interviews with other CEOs....guys...had a focus on work/home time balance.

If true, then people need to calm the fark down and stop PMSing.


Article states nothing of the kind. It says that a recent Today segment with ordinary people, not CEOs, talked about how modern dads are different from the dads of, say, Lauer's generation.

I will be stunned if, in the entire history of the Today show, anybody has ever asked the equivalent question of a male CEO.

By the way, this was far from the most "asymmetric" question in the interview. There was also a section  about whether, as a mother herself, she felt particularly bad about the people killed due to the mishandled recall. Again, I guarantee you nobody has ever asked a male CEO whether they feel bad "as a father" about their business causing harm.

Those of you who either don't see or don't want to see this asymmetry, frankly you need to check your privilege.

As for Infernalist, well, the last word of his post tells you everything you need to know about his prejudice.
 
2014-06-28 07:25:11 AM  
Jesus Christ, people are so farking sensitive. This line of questioning is actually offensive to someone? EABOD feminists. In typical family, the mother raises the children while the father earns a living. We're still breaking down those established dynamics. It might be interesting to hear how a mother balances her professional/personal life.
 
2014-06-28 07:26:35 AM  

DubyaHater: In typical family, the mother raises the children while the father earns a living.


In what decade are you living?
 
2014-06-28 07:59:51 AM  

gadian: gadian: He personally loves it, but it is something I just cannot tolerate.

That might be misinterpreted.  I can't tolerate staying at home, I didn't mean that I can't tolerate him staying home.



Ha, good catch. I have to admit, I re-read it a couple of times to see which you meant.
 
2014-06-28 08:02:52 AM  

czetie: Infernalist: Article states that a recent set of interviews with other CEOs....guys...had a focus on work/home time balance.

If true, then people need to calm the fark down and stop PMSing.

Article states nothing of the kind. It says that a recent Today segment with ordinary people, not CEOs, talked about how modern dads are different from the dads of, say, Lauer's generation.

I will be stunned if, in the entire history of the Today show, anybody has ever asked the equivalent question of a male CEO.

By the way, this was far from the most "asymmetric" question in the interview. There was also a section  about whether, as a mother herself, she felt particularly bad about the people killed due to the mishandled recall. Again, I guarantee you nobody has ever asked a male CEO whether they feel bad "as a father" about their business causing harm.


Really? You're willing to guarantee it?  Male CEOs have been asked plenty of times whether they, as a parent themselves, felt badly about something.  Not saying it happens all the time, but 100+ years is a long time to be able to find such instances.
 
2014-06-28 08:27:07 AM  

Strongbeerrules: Sorry, but I'd just rather work with male supervisors. Nothing personal.


After 6 years in purgatory with an all-female company (boss is male, only hires women) I would rather poke my eyes out than ever, ever have to work with all women again.

I do believe in work/life balance, and keep the two <i>separate</i>.  Those witches had no idea what was going on in my life, but I got the pleasure of knowing the make up of one of their kid's vomit, so on and so forth.  I realize I am not a typical chick in that I have had almost exclusively male friends since I was in kindergarten,  but what the ever-living fark is wrong with women and their over-sharing? And whining?
 
2014-06-28 08:27:54 AM  
I watched the interview and the question seemed appropriate.
 
2014-06-28 08:34:52 AM  
I figured that more people would be angry at his "Do you consider yourself a MILF?" question.
 
2014-06-28 08:40:53 AM  
"If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

www.findmeagift.com
 
2014-06-28 08:53:46 AM  

serpent_sky: Strongbeerrules: Sorry, but I'd just rather work with male supervisors. Nothing personal.

After 6 years in purgatory with an all-female company (boss is male, only hires women) I would rather poke my eyes out than ever, ever have to work with all women again.

I do believe in work/life balance, and keep the two <i>separate</i>.  Those witches had no idea what was going on in my life, but I got the pleasure of knowing the make up of one of their kid's vomit, so on and so forth.  I realize I am not a typical chick in that I have had almost exclusively male friends since I was in kindergarten,  but what the ever-living fark is wrong with women and their over-sharing? And whining?


They want you to feel bad for them. They need their personal stress and anxiety to be validated by others. It's the most pathetic thing. Doubly so when they're complaining about their kids.
 
2014-06-28 08:54:24 AM  

SwingingJohnson: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

[www.findmeagift.com image 300x300]


Really? If a man had said, "I'm bummed I'm going to miss a bunch of my son's little league games because of my new job," you don't think a follow-up question about work life balance would have happened?

I think you people are confusing The Today Show for The Man Show.
 
2014-06-28 08:57:18 AM  

SwingingJohnson: "If a man had publicly said something similar after accepting a high-level job, I would have asked him exactly the same thing."

[www.findmeagift.com image 300x300]


it only sounds like bullshiat because so few men would ever say something similar in the first place. The opportunity to ask wouldn't arise. Very few men, compared to women, need people to sympathize with them over the consequences of their own life decisions.
 
2014-06-28 08:58:05 AM  
I'm sure her sons's nanny took some great pictures for her to enjoy later.
 
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