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(YouTube)   Let's take a trip in the wayback machine and have a look at race relations in 1974   (youtube.com) divider line 31
    More: Amusing  
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3774 clicks; posted to Video » on 26 Jun 2014 at 8:44 AM (47 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-26 02:17:41 AM  
wow, that was awesome!
 
2014-06-26 02:48:16 AM  
Network TV in 1974.  Actually asking you to think.
 
2014-06-26 02:53:19 AM  
My school participated in bussing during that time.
 
2014-06-26 03:25:22 AM  
The point of that, at the time, was to lampoon racism.
 
2014-06-26 03:46:51 AM  

violentsalvation: The point of that, at the time, was to lampoon racism.


i.chzbgr.com
 
2014-06-26 07:26:34 AM  

violentsalvation: The point of that, at the time, was to lampoon racism.


the next thing you're going to tell me is that All In The Family was known for taking on the social issues of the 70's.
 
2014-06-26 08:03:36 AM  

Dheiner: Network TV in 1974.  Actually asking you to think.


fans-pages.com

Those were the days.
 
2014-06-26 09:22:57 AM  
That would be way too controversial today. I'm surprised it hasn't been scrubbed from the internet yet.
 
2014-06-26 09:28:02 AM  
People forget that George Jefferson was originally intended to be the black version of Archie:  someone
who was just as bigoted and narrow minded about things, but from the other side.  But, much like
Carol O'Connor, he did such a good job with the character and had such natural charisma that he
transcended his initial parameters.
 
2014-06-26 09:36:51 AM  

some_beer_drinker: wow, that was awesome!


If it makes you feel better, most people missed the point, including my father.
 
2014-06-26 10:01:12 AM  
I was never big fan of all in the family ( I only saw it in reruns, i wa born in '74) but that was well written.
 
2014-06-26 10:04:32 AM  
Such a great show... It's one of the few things I remember doing before my mother died. My daughter even liked it when she was about 2 or so. Of course she didn't like the show, but the song would pull her out of a crying spell, and she seemed mesmerized by Edith, one of the absolute sweetest female characters ever created for a TV show.

This show couldn't be done now, not because of everyone's "Oh, we've gotten too PC" excuse though. Just like Blazing Saddles, it was easy to make the racist baiting blatant, because there was widespread racism that was still accepted in regular society. As a result, blatant was what it took. Nowadays, you have to do something more subtle, because the racism is far more subtle than it was. You have to dig a little deeper to poke the tiger in the eye. That show is one of the best things that ever appeared on TV, since it brought the discussion to the front in a way that most other attempts were not able to.

And having George Jefferson included was a true stroke of genius, it went on to show that racism existed on both sides of the coin, and mixed couples had to deal with shiat from both sides.
 
2014-06-26 10:07:00 AM  

maudibjr: I was never big fan of all in the family ( I only saw it in reruns, i wa born in '74) but that was well written.


Actually, the whole show was well written. Regardless of the subject line, they covered shiat that wasn't being covered. Edith getting raped, and Edith experiencing menopause were just two of the subjects other than race that were covered. They even had Archie mature over the years, become less of an asshole, although never perfect. Most sitcoms have the characters stay exactly the same so that the laughs are more or less guaranteed.
 
2014-06-26 10:12:08 AM  

Mikey1969: They even had Archie mature over the years, become less of an asshole, although never perfect.


The part of "Flawed human" was played perfectly.
 
2014-06-26 10:18:13 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: People forget that George Jefferson was originally intended to be the black version of Archie:  someone
who was just as bigoted and narrow minded about things, but from the other side.  But, much like
Carol O'Connor, he did such a good job with the character and had such natural charisma that he
transcended his initial parameters.


both were credits to their races.
 
2014-06-26 10:55:01 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: But, much like
Carol O'Connor, he did such a good job with the character and had such natural charisma that he
transcended his initial parameters.


In both cases, the character was  supposed to be someone you would like. Archie was always meant to be  basically a good guy, but with outdated and backwards opinions. When he finds out one of his co-workers is gay, his reaction is played for laughs- but in the end, he chooses that continuing the friendship is more important than his biases. And, amusingly, they inverted the stereotypes in that episode- the effeminate friend of Meathead is straight, the masculine friend of Archie is gay.

Mikey1969: shiat that wasn't being covered. Edith getting raped, and Edith experiencing menopause


Their "women's lib" episode could be produced today, without changing a line, and be just as relevant.
 
2014-06-26 11:02:20 AM  
 
2014-06-26 11:08:19 AM  

t3knomanser: DjangoStonereaver: But, much like
Carol O'Connor, he did such a good job with the character and had such natural charisma that he
transcended his initial parameters.

In both cases, the character was  supposed to be someone you would like. Archie was always meant to be  basically a good guy, but with outdated and backwards opinions. When he finds out one of his co-workers is gay, his reaction is played for laughs- but in the end, he chooses that continuing the friendship is more important than his biases. And, amusingly, they inverted the stereotypes in that episode- the effeminate friend of Meathead is straight, the masculine friend of Archie is gay.


Actually, I'd heard that, in the beginning, the audience was supposed to hate Archie precisely because he
was bigotted and narrow minded.  Norman Lear wanted to sledgehammer home his agenda and wasn't
shy about it, but to his credit when the initial audience reaction to Archie was positive, he recognized that
he had gotten the concept wrong and very quickly adapted things in the manner that you list, and that
ended up achieving his purpose of discussing taboo subjects in a mature fashion far better than he ever
could have hoped.

And all due to the fact that Carol O'Connor is one of the best actors ever to appear on television.
 
2014-06-26 11:38:12 AM  
Meanwhile, we can't be trusted to understand "Blazing Saddles" without numerous cuts nowadays
 
2014-06-26 01:11:47 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: t3knomanser: DjangoStonereaver: But, much like
Carol O'Connor, he did such a good job with the character and had such natural charisma that he
transcended his initial parameters.

In both cases, the character was  supposed to be someone you would like. Archie was always meant to be  basically a good guy, but with outdated and backwards opinions. When he finds out one of his co-workers is gay, his reaction is played for laughs- but in the end, he chooses that continuing the friendship is more important than his biases. And, amusingly, they inverted the stereotypes in that episode- the effeminate friend of Meathead is straight, the masculine friend of Archie is gay.

Actually, I'd heard that, in the beginning, the audience was supposed to hate Archie precisely because he
was bigotted and narrow minded.  Norman Lear wanted to sledgehammer home his agenda and wasn't
shy about it, but to his credit when the initial audience reaction to Archie was positive, he recognized that
he had gotten the concept wrong and very quickly adapted things in the manner that you list, and that
ended up achieving his purpose of discussing taboo subjects in a mature fashion far better than he ever
could have hoped.

And all due to the fact that Carol O'Connor is one of the best actors ever to appear on television.



Probably no coincidence that James Gandolfini is the one other guy I could picture as Archie Bunker.
 
2014-06-26 01:51:49 PM  

zerkalo: Meanwhile, we can't be trusted to understand "Blazing Saddles" without numerous cuts nowadays


Excuse me while I whip this out.
 
2014-06-26 03:21:52 PM  

Monkeyfark Ridiculous: Probably no coincidence that James Gandolfini is the one other guy I could picture as Archie Bunker.


Listening to Bill Burr's podcast I keep thinking if they were to remake AITF he would make a good Archie
 
2014-06-26 06:16:52 PM  
Interesting to see the proto-Tom Willis, before they characterized him a goofy honky.
 
2014-06-26 06:18:07 PM  
All in the Family was an American remake of the British sitcom "Till Death Do Us Part", which was pretty good too.
But once you know the American characters are just American versions of their British counterparts, they don't seem so ground breaking, but they're still enjoyable. Both shows were a fun watch. And both shows were good enough to produce spin offs.
 
2014-06-26 08:08:14 PM  

Easy Reader: Interesting to see the proto-Tom Willis, before they characterized him a goofy honky.


good call. i don't remember that in the clip guy, but Tom did that on the Jeffersons.
 
2014-06-26 10:37:56 PM  

Mikey1969: maudibjr: I was never big fan of all in the family ( I only saw it in reruns, i wa born in '74) but that was well written.

Actually, the whole show was well written. Regardless of the subject line, they covered shiat that wasn't being covered. Edith getting raped, and Edith experiencing menopause were just two of the subjects other than race that were covered. They even had Archie mature over the years, become less of an asshole, although never perfect. Most sitcoms have the characters stay exactly the same so that the laughs are more or less guaranteed.


Your point was proven when Archie said, "Even I haven't used that word in three years." and moments later shared a sympathetic drink with George.

/the last joke was good, the thought of everyone looking alike is cracking me up.
 
2014-06-26 10:53:48 PM  

t3knomanser: DjangoStonereaver: But, much like
Carol O'Connor, he did such a good job with the character and had such natural charisma that he
transcended his initial parameters.

In both cases, the character was  supposed to be someone you would like. Archie was always meant to be  basically a good guy, but with outdated and backwards opinions. When he finds out one of his co-workers is gay, his reaction is played for laughs- but in the end, he chooses that continuing the friendship is more important than his biases. And, amusingly, they inverted the stereotypes in that episode- the effeminate friend of Meathead is straight, the masculine friend of Archie is gay.

Mikey1969: shiat that wasn't being covered. Edith getting raped, and Edith experiencing menopause

Their "women's lib" episode could be produced today, without changing a line, and be just as relevant.


Yeah, it takes some finesse from the writers, the actors, the director, even the editors to take someone as outwardly reprehensible as Archie seems on the surface and show you that deep inside, he's not a bad person.

Of course, it takes some brains on the part of the viewers, too, and you still hear stories about people who didn't 'get it'. A lot of people have an uncle or a friend's father(maybe even their own) who thought the show was funny because they thought Archie was talking TO them, rather than showing them that the Emperor, in fact, had no clothes...
 
2014-06-26 10:54:48 PM  

lack of warmth: Mikey1969: maudibjr: I was never big fan of all in the family ( I only saw it in reruns, i wa born in '74) but that was well written.

Actually, the whole show was well written. Regardless of the subject line, they covered shiat that wasn't being covered. Edith getting raped, and Edith experiencing menopause were just two of the subjects other than race that were covered. They even had Archie mature over the years, become less of an asshole, although never perfect. Most sitcoms have the characters stay exactly the same so that the laughs are more or less guaranteed.

Your point was proven when Archie said, "Even I haven't used that word in three years." and moments later shared a sympathetic drink with George.

/the last joke was good, the thought of everyone looking alike is cracking me up.


LOL, sometimes you feel sorry for Archie because he just looks so farking confused...
 
2014-06-27 03:36:45 AM  
I have almost been part of that situation. I am white and my wife is black. She jokes and says she married me because I would be easy spot at her family reunions and church (she's the pastor fwiw). Our daughter is gorgeous and you just never know what color the next boyfriend will be.
 
2014-06-27 10:16:01 AM  

some_beer_drinker: Easy Reader: Interesting to see the proto-Tom Willis, before they characterized him a goofy honky.

good call. i don't remember that in the clip guy, but Tom did that on the Jeffersons.


In this version, Tom's the enlightened one.  No pun intended.
 
2014-06-27 06:48:51 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: t3knomanser: DjangoStonereaver: But, much like
Carol O'Connor, he did such a good job with the character and had such natural charisma that he
transcended his initial parameters.

In both cases, the character was  supposed to be someone you would like. Archie was always meant to be  basically a good guy, but with outdated and backwards opinions. When he finds out one of his co-workers is gay, his reaction is played for laughs- but in the end, he chooses that continuing the friendship is more important than his biases. And, amusingly, they inverted the stereotypes in that episode- the effeminate friend of Meathead is straight, the masculine friend of Archie is gay.

Actually, I'd heard that, in the beginning, the audience was supposed to hate Archie precisely because he
was bigotted and narrow minded.  Norman Lear wanted to sledgehammer home his agenda and wasn't
shy about it, but to his credit when the initial audience reaction to Archie was positive, he recognized that
he had gotten the concept wrong and very quickly adapted things in the manner that you list, and that
ended up achieving his purpose of discussing taboo subjects in a mature fashion far better than he ever
could have hoped.

And all due to the fact that Carol O'Connor is one of the best actors ever to appear on television.


 Carol O'Connor is a god-damn bonified National Treasure.
 
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