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(The Big Story)   Thad Cochran survives election against challenger, outlasting Dick Lugar as sitting Senator with the best porn name   (bigstory.ap.org) divider line 69
    More: Interesting, humans, Sen. Tom Coburn, James Lankford, Chris McDaniel, Mississippians, 2008 presidential candidate, Ralph Hall, Senate Appropriations Committee  
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397 clicks; posted to Politics » on 25 Jun 2014 at 2:09 PM (25 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-25 08:15:05 PM  
Funny how that in Mississippi State Democratic Party v Barbour, 07-6066 , the US District Court ruled that open primaries were just fine in Mississippi.


Guss that only applies when republicans cross over to fark the democratic party's primary.

http://www.ballot-access.org/2008/05/mississippi-democratic-party-lo se s-open-primary-case-on-ripeness/

/or when the NAACP is involved
 
2014-06-25 08:16:36 PM  
shortdarkandmeh:

*Sigh* I'll bet you consider yourself enlightened.
/Mississippi moderate who realized long ago that smug, self-righteous people from other regions can be just as bad as the derpers from my own state. Rants like yours might feel good to you, but they accomplish nothing in the long run.


I am a registered Republican. I registered Republican almost exactly 40 years ago so I could vote for the worst candidate in the primaries, making it easier for the Democrat to win. In 2008 I voted for Mike Huckabee. I was probably the only Jew in Massachusetts who voted for him; I considered forming a committee called "Jew for Huckabee." All in good fun but in the final analysis, I chose to live in Massachusetts for a reason (I grew up in Michigan and Connecticut). People make fun of Mississippi because it is a joke. You are at the bottom of the barrel by every standard of modernity. If you can't fix it, you should get the fark out. If you can't bring yourself to leave, you should grin and bear it. You should not visit a forum like and complain when people make fun of your incredible laughable, potentially dangerous (in a legislative sense) state.  Sorry, that's just the way it is.
 
2014-06-25 08:18:49 PM  

Glockenspiel Hero: The most interesting bit? He won primarily by exploiting the open primary and getting Democrats, mostly blacks, to vote for him. Check out the flyer below


which is what open primaries suppose to do. Since they let other non-party members vote they are supposed to make it so less extreme candidates become nominated. It wasn't some trick.
 
2014-06-25 09:14:56 PM  
Too bad there's no Senator named  "Willy Johnson" or "Peter Horney" or  "Dick Woodcock (Glascock)"....
 
2014-06-25 09:15:12 PM  

Glockenspiel Hero: As you might imagine, stuff like this has left some Tea Party types a bit butthurt.


A bit?

Damn their tears are delicious.
 
2014-06-25 09:59:19 PM  
All Mississippi did was buy 6 more years of semi-sanity.  The next generation of Republicans is very Tea Party-ish.  At some point the radicals will take the wheel of the party and then the country will have to watch out.  As much as the GOP Powers That Be try to undermine the Tea Party they keep coming back more radical than ever.
 
2014-06-25 10:24:33 PM  

clambam: shortdarkandmeh:

*Sigh* I'll bet you consider yourself enlightened.
/Mississippi moderate who realized long ago that smug, self-righteous people from other regions can be just as bad as the derpers from my own state. Rants like yours might feel good to you, but they accomplish nothing in the long run.

I am a registered Republican. I registered Republican almost exactly 40 years ago so I could vote for the worst candidate in the primaries, making it easier for the Democrat to win. In 2008 I voted for Mike Huckabee. I was probably the only Jew in Massachusetts who voted for him; I considered forming a committee called "Jew for Huckabee." All in good fun but in the final analysis, I chose to live in Massachusetts for a reason (I grew up in Michigan and Connecticut). People make fun of Mississippi because it is a joke. You are at the bottom of the barrel by every standard of modernity. If you can't fix it, you should get the fark out. If you can't bring yourself to leave, you should grin and bear it. You should not visit a forum like and complain when people make fun of your incredible laughable, potentially dangerous (in a legislative sense) state.  Sorry, that's just the way it is.


Guess I touched a nerve, huh? Does it irk you when people defend themselves from blanket statements? You shouldn't post whargarbl then get all butthurt when someone has a different point of view. Sorry, that's just the way it is.
/And what do I give two shiats for your Republican credentials? Or lack thereof?
 
2014-06-25 10:35:05 PM  

shortdarkandmeh: clambam: shortdarkandmeh:

*Sigh* I'll bet you consider yourself enlightened.
/Mississippi moderate who realized long ago that smug, self-righteous people from other regions can be just as bad as the derpers from my own state. Rants like yours might feel good to you, but they accomplish nothing in the long run.

I am a registered Republican. I registered Republican almost exactly 40 years ago so I could vote for the worst candidate in the primaries, making it easier for the Democrat to win. In 2008 I voted for Mike Huckabee. I was probably the only Jew in Massachusetts who voted for him; I considered forming a committee called "Jew for Huckabee." All in good fun but in the final analysis, I chose to live in Massachusetts for a reason (I grew up in Michigan and Connecticut). People make fun of Mississippi because it is a joke. You are at the bottom of the barrel by every standard of modernity. If you can't fix it, you should get the fark out. If you can't bring yourself to leave, you should grin and bear it. You should not visit a forum like and complain when people make fun of your incredible laughable, potentially dangerous (in a legislative sense) state.  Sorry, that's just the way it is.

Guess I touched a nerve, huh? Does it irk you when people defend themselves from blanket statements? You shouldn't post whargarbl then get all butthurt when someone has a different point of view. Sorry, that's just the way it is.
/And what do I give two shiats for your Republican credentials? Or lack thereof?


Wow, you understood my post in completely ass backward manner. You deserve to live in Mississippi.
 
2014-06-25 10:43:36 PM  

clambam: shortdarkandmeh: clambam: shortdarkandmeh:

*Sigh* I'll bet you consider yourself enlightened.
/Mississippi moderate who realized long ago that smug, self-righteous people from other regions can be just as bad as the derpers from my own state. Rants like yours might feel good to you, but they accomplish nothing in the long run.

I am a registered Republican. I registered Republican almost exactly 40 years ago so I could vote for the worst candidate in the primaries, making it easier for the Democrat to win. In 2008 I voted for Mike Huckabee. I was probably the only Jew in Massachusetts who voted for him; I considered forming a committee called "Jew for Huckabee." All in good fun but in the final analysis, I chose to live in Massachusetts for a reason (I grew up in Michigan and Connecticut). People make fun of Mississippi because it is a joke. You are at the bottom of the barrel by every standard of modernity. If you can't fix it, you should get the fark out. If you can't bring yourself to leave, you should grin and bear it. You should not visit a forum like and complain when people make fun of your incredible laughable, potentially dangerous (in a legislative sense) state.  Sorry, that's just the way it is.

Guess I touched a nerve, huh? Does it irk you when people defend themselves from blanket statements? You shouldn't post whargarbl then get all butthurt when someone has a different point of view. Sorry, that's just the way it is.
/And what do I give two shiats for your Republican credentials? Or lack thereof?

Wow, you understood my post in completely ass backward manner. You deserve to live in Mississippi.


Oh, you're going with that defense, huh? "B-but you misunderstood my post!"
/A couple of other Farkers welcomed me to/warned me about the Politics tab, but actually, this is kinda fun...
 
2014-06-25 11:22:59 PM  

shortdarkandmeh: clambam: shortdarkandmeh: clambam: shortdarkandmeh:

*Sigh* I'll bet you consider yourself enlightened.
/Mississippi moderate who realized long ago that smug, self-righteous people from other regions can be just as bad as the derpers from my own state. Rants like yours might feel good to you, but they accomplish nothing in the long run.

I am a registered Republican. I registered Republican almost exactly 40 years ago so I could vote for the worst candidate in the primaries, making it easier for the Democrat to win. In 2008 I voted for Mike Huckabee. I was probably the only Jew in Massachusetts who voted for him; I considered forming a committee called "Jew for Huckabee." All in good fun but in the final analysis, I chose to live in Massachusetts for a reason (I grew up in Michigan and Connecticut). People make fun of Mississippi because it is a joke. You are at the bottom of the barrel by every standard of modernity. If you can't fix it, you should get the fark out. If you can't bring yourself to leave, you should grin and bear it. You should not visit a forum like and complain when people make fun of your incredible laughable, potentially dangerous (in a legislative sense) state.  Sorry, that's just the way it is.

Guess I touched a nerve, huh? Does it irk you when people defend themselves from blanket statements? You shouldn't post whargarbl then get all butthurt when someone has a different point of view. Sorry, that's just the way it is.
/And what do I give two shiats for your Republican credentials? Or lack thereof?

Wow, you understood my post in completely ass backward manner. You deserve to live in Mississippi.

Oh, you're going with that defense, huh? "B-but you misunderstood my post!"
/A couple of other Farkers welcomed me to/warned me about the Politics tab, but actually, this is kinda fun...


No, apparently you really are retarded. And no, you can't have the keys to my car.
 
2014-06-26 01:17:04 AM  

pedobearapproved: The Name: Infernalist: Good.  Cochran is one of the last few moderate GOPers who knows how to work across the aisle.  GOPer or not, Cochran is head and shoulders above that tea bagging moron McDaniels.

Sure, the Democrats would have been better served by having a Tea Derper replace Cochran, but Mississippi would have been badly served by that same moron.

No, not good.  Now MS will just continue along the same road it has since the Civil Rights Movement, electing nothing but Republicans and settling for the same old mediocrity (to put it generously) that that party has always brought them, when it COULD have elected a Teabagger, learned its lesson about electing Republicans, and perhaps made a change for the better in its electoral decisions and thus its overall quality of life.

You know how I know you don't know anything about southern politics.


Yeah, about that:

www.theatlantic.com

http://www.theatlantic.com/past/docs/issues/98jun/gop.htm

/Maybe "nothing but Republicans" is an exaggeration, but the change in the Solid South has been pretty dramatic.
//The Southern states still have a handful of Democrats in Congress; about half of them are members of the Congressional Black Caucus.
 
2014-06-26 01:39:48 AM  

pedobearapproved: The Name: Infernalist: Good.  Cochran is one of the last few moderate GOPers who knows how to work across the aisle.  GOPer or not, Cochran is head and shoulders above that tea bagging moron McDaniels.

Sure, the Democrats would have been better served by having a Tea Derper replace Cochran, but Mississippi would have been badly served by that same moron.

No, not good.  Now MS will just continue along the same road it has since the Civil Rights Movement, electing nothing but Republicans and settling for the same old mediocrity (to put it generously) that that party has always brought them, when it COULD have elected a Teabagger, learned its lesson about electing Republicans, and perhaps made a change for the better in its electoral decisions and thus its overall quality of life.

You know how I know you don't know anything about southern politics.


See also:

The Southernization of the GOP has been a long time coming, but it has now truly arrived. In the first congressional elections of the New Deal era, in 1934, there were  no Republicans from the South or West; 90 percent of the Republicans in the 74th Congress came from the northern tier. As late as 1946, the GOP gained control of the House on the basis of votes from New England and the Atlantic, Great Lakes and Plains regions. By 1984, however, more than 50 percent of the Republicans in the Senate were from the South and west of the Mississippi.
These shifts aren't just at the , either. Since the 1960s, the Republican Party has increasingly been able to  governors, other state officials and legislators in the South, although local and county machines still tend to be Democratic. Last November, the gains were particularly dramatic, from Texas, where George Bush Jr. beat out Ann Richards, to Florida, where only the votes of elderly retirees (many from the Northeast) saved Democratic Governor Lawton Chiles from defeat at the hands of another Bush scion, Jeb. This local depth, in turn, has given the Southern Republicans what they had, until recently, lacked: a large pool of able, experienced  at lower levels who can be recruited to run for more important offices. Their ranks have been augmented by the defections of conservative Democratic "boll weevils," such as Bob Stump, a representative from Arizona, who joined the GOP in 1982, and Phil Gramm, who converted in 1983 after he was thrown off the House Budget Committee by Democratic leaders.
The foundations of November's Republican victories in the South, and in Washington, are now familiar. They were established in the 1960s by Barry Goldwater and Richard Nixon, with some help from George Wallace. In 1964, Goldwater's opposition to federal civil rights legislation made him the hero of white supremacists. Though he lost his presidential bid, Goldwater mortally wounded the older Northeastern Republican establishment. William Rusher, the former publisher of National Review and one of the architects of the Goldwater campaign, has written that it "turned the Republican Party over--permanently, as matters turned out--to a new and basically conservative coalition based on the South, the Southwest and the West, ending the long hegemony of the relatively liberal East in the GOP's affairs." Significantly, five of the six states Goldwater carried were south of the Mason-Dixon Line.
The success of Goldwater, and of George Wallace in his independent 1968 presidential bid, inspired Richard Nixon's "Southern Strategy" (which had its manifesto in Kevin Phillips's 1969 book The Emerging Republican Majority). Nixon's plan to substitute ex-Democrat John Connally for Spiro Agnew as vice president so Connally could run for office in 1976 as the candidate of the new Republican majority party, was wrecked by Watergate and the temporary revulsion for the GOP. Under Reagan, Bush and Clinton, however, the long-term trend toward Republican growth in the South and West resumed, with the result that today the stereotypical reactionary Southern senator with a drawl is more likely to be a member of the Republican congressional leadership than a Dixie Democrat.

Goldwater was primarily responsible for turning the party of Lincoln into a "white man's party" which, by the 1990s, would be dominated by the ideological descendants of the Dixiecrats (and in some cases, like that of Strom Thurmond, by surviving Dixiecrats). In 1960, Goldwater denounced the Compact of Fifth Avenue between Nelson Rockefeller and Richard Nixon as the "Munich of the Republican Party" because of Nixon's agreement to revise the platform in favor of "aggressive action to remove the remaining vestiges of segregation or discrimination in all areas of national life." As Goldwater explained to an Atlanta audience in 1961, "We're not going to get the negro vote as a block in 1964 and 1968, so we ought to go hunting where the ducks are."

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/politics/the-southern-coup
 
2014-06-26 01:55:38 AM  

pedobearapproved: The Name: Infernalist: Good.  Cochran is one of the last few moderate GOPers who knows how to work across the aisle.  GOPer or not, Cochran is head and shoulders above that tea bagging moron McDaniels.

Sure, the Democrats would have been better served by having a Tea Derper replace Cochran, but Mississippi would have been badly served by that same moron.

No, not good.  Now MS will just continue along the same road it has since the Civil Rights Movement, electing nothing but Republicans and settling for the same old mediocrity (to put it generously) that that party has always brought them, when it COULD have elected a Teabagger, learned its lesson about electing Republicans, and perhaps made a change for the better in its electoral decisions and thus its overall quality of life.

You know how I know you don't know anything about southern politics.


See also:

the Columbus Dispatch. "It's the southerners."
Voinovich, a native Clevelander who retires after the 2010 election, continued after the southern elements of the GOP.
"They get on TV and go 'errrr, errrrr,'" he said. "People hear them and say, 'These people, they're southerners. The party's being taken over by southerners. What they hell they got to do with Ohio?'"
I don't imagine these remarks are going to go over especially well in conservative circles, especially south of the Mason-Dixon line. But the comments, while seemingly intemperate, are hardly scandalous.
Indeed, in November, Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty (R) said the GOP is struggling to become "a majority governing party" because its base is limited geographically. David Broder wrote in December, "The Southern domination of the congressional Republican Party has become more complete with each and every election."

http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/archives/individual/2009_07/019257. ph p
 
2014-06-26 03:24:40 AM  

pedobearapproved: The Name: Infernalist: Good.  Cochran is one of the last few moderate GOPers who knows how to work across the aisle.  GOPer or not, Cochran is head and shoulders above that tea bagging moron McDaniels.

Sure, the Democrats would have been better served by having a Tea Derper replace Cochran, but Mississippi would have been badly served by that same moron.

No, not good.  Now MS will just continue along the same road it has since the Civil Rights Movement, electing nothing but Republicans and settling for the same old mediocrity (to put it generously) that that party has always brought them, when it COULD have elected a Teabagger, learned its lesson about electing Republicans, and perhaps made a change for the better in its electoral decisions and thus its overall quality of life.

You know how I know you don't know anything about southern politics.


See also:

Possible modern realigning elections in the United States[http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Realigning_election& action=e dit&section=5" title="Edit section: Possible modern realigning elections in the United States" style="text-decoration: none; color: rgb(11, 0, 128); background: none;">edit]
Some debate exists today as to what elections (if any) could be considered realigning elections after 1932. Although several candidates have been proposed, there is no widespread agreement:
The 1968 election is often cited due to the innovative campaign strategy of Nixon. In running against http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/States%27_rights" title="States' rights" style="text-decoration: none; color: rgb(11, 0, 128); background: none;">states' rights," which they interpreted as meaning that the federal government would no longer demand the  Roosevelt's New Deal coalition had lasted over 30 years but after the urban riots and Vietnam crisis of the mid 1960s one by one the coalition partners peeled away until only a hollow core remained, setting the stage for a GOP revival. Nixon's downfall postponed the realignment which came about under Reagan, as even the term "liberalism" fell into disrepute.
Including this as a realignment preserves the roughly 30-year cyclical pattern: 1896 to 1932, 1932 to 1964, and 1964 to 1994.
For political scientists, 1964 was primarily an issue-based realignment. The classic study of the 1964 election, by Carmines and Stimson (1989), shows how the polarization of activists and elites on race-related issues sent clear signals to the general public about the historic change in each party's position on Civil Rights.[citation needed] Notably, while only 50% of African-Americans self-identified as Democrats in the 1960 National Election Study, 82% did in 1964, and the numbers are higher in the 21st century. The clearest indicator of the importance of this election, was that Deep Southern states, such as Mississippi, voted Republican in 1964. In contrast, much of the traditional Republican strongholds of the Northeast and Upper Midwest voted Democratic. Vermont and Maine, which stood alone voting against FDR in 1936, voted for LBJ in 1964.
Many analysts do not consider 1968 a realigning election because control of  Also missing was a marked change in the partisan orientation of the electorate. Importantly, these two elections are consistent with the theory in that the old New Deal issues were replaced by Civil Rights issues as the major factor explaining why citizens identified with each party. Other scholarscontend that this is the beginning of a thirty year dealignment, in which citizens generally moved towards political independence, which ended with the 1994 election.
In this election, Ronald Reagan won a sweeping victory over Democrat 
On the other hand, critics like Mayhew (2004) note that control of the House did not change, nor even come close to changing, at this time. Republicans actually held fewer House seats in 1983 than they held in 1973. In addition, the Republicans lost the Senate again only six years later, leading some to conclude that the Senators simply rode in on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Southern_Strategy" title="Southern Strategy" class="mw-redirect" style="text-decoration: none; color: rgb(11, 0, 128); background: none;">Southern Strategy seem to bear this fact out.
 
1992 presidential election - Bill Clinton
The presence of independent candidate Ross Perot, who received nearly 19% of the vote, made this a three-way contest. Perot, despite his strong showing for a third-party candidate, failed to win any electoral votes. Clinton won a plurality and carried several states that had previously been Republican or swing states in both the Northeast and on the West Coast. Most notably, the largest state California switched from being a reliably Republican state to being consistently Democratic: it has been carried by Democratic candidates ever since. Other states that switched and have remained with the Democrats since include Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Vermont. In contrast, despite the fact Clinton came from the South, he only carried four of the former Confederate states: Arkansas (his home state), Louisiana, Tennessee (his vice president's home state) and Georgia, confirming it as a Republican base of support.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Realigning_election#Realigning_election s_ in_United_States_history

/Seriously, the realignment of the Solid South from solidly Democratic to solidly Republican was probably the biggest event in domestic politics of the 20th Century.
//Maybe Goldwater shouldn't have suggested sawing off the Northeast and let it drift out to sea. . .
 
2014-06-26 08:52:06 AM  

shortdarkandmeh: kliq: I teach in Mississippi (NY native) and this campaign has been like living in an alternate reality. Both candidates paid millions of dollars to showcase how conservative they were. No one ever contemplated that Mississippi is an embarrassment to our country and that maybe progressive ideas should be given a shot?

I know you probably mean well, but blanket statements don't help. I do agree with the progressive ideas statement, though.


If my home state was 50th in every category, I'd be embarrassed.
 
2014-06-26 09:33:10 AM  

clambam: shortdarkandmeh: clambam: shortdarkandmeh: clambam: shortdarkandmeh:

*Sigh* I'll bet you consider yourself enlightened.
/Mississippi moderate who realized long ago that smug, self-righteous people from other regions can be just as bad as the derpers from my own state. Rants like yours might feel good to you, but they accomplish nothing in the long run.

I am a registered Republican. I registered Republican almost exactly 40 years ago so I could vote for the worst candidate in the primaries, making it easier for the Democrat to win. In 2008 I voted for Mike Huckabee. I was probably the only Jew in Massachusetts who voted for him; I considered forming a committee called "Jew for Huckabee." All in good fun but in the final analysis, I chose to live in Massachusetts for a reason (I grew up in Michigan and Connecticut). People make fun of Mississippi because it is a joke. You are at the bottom of the barrel by every standard of modernity. If you can't fix it, you should get the fark out. If you can't bring yourself to leave, you should grin and bear it. You should not visit a forum like and complain when people make fun of your incredible laughable, potentially dangerous (in a legislative sense) state.  Sorry, that's just the way it is.

Guess I touched a nerve, huh? Does it irk you when people defend themselves from blanket statements? You shouldn't post whargarbl then get all butthurt when someone has a different point of view. Sorry, that's just the way it is.
/And what do I give two shiats for your Republican credentials? Or lack thereof?

Wow, you understood my post in completely ass backward manner. You deserve to live in Mississippi.

Oh, you're going with that defense, huh? "B-but you misunderstood my post!"
/A couple of other Farkers welcomed me to/warned me about the Politics tab, but actually, this is kinda fun...

No, apparently you really are retarded. And no, you can't have the keys to my car.


Oh no, I've been judged by a self-appointed arbiter who thinks I have no right to post on a forum regarding my state. You've sure showed me. You must be one of them-thar Massholes I've heard about.
Actually, you're just a douche from Michigan who moved to Massachusetts and was bested by a Mississippian he considers beneath him. Congratulations. You are the Tom Brady of the Politics tab.
 
2014-06-26 09:36:35 AM  

kliq: shortdarkandmeh: kliq: I teach in Mississippi (NY native) and this campaign has been like living in an alternate reality. Both candidates paid millions of dollars to showcase how conservative they were. No one ever contemplated that Mississippi is an embarrassment to our country and that maybe progressive ideas should be given a shot?

I know you probably mean well, but blanket statements don't help. I do agree with the progressive ideas statement, though.

If my home state was 50th in every category, I'd be embarrassed.


Why? I guess I'm more of an individualist than you. I don't define myself solely by my region. And you say you teach in Mississippi? Does your condescension come across to your students?
 
2014-06-26 09:54:12 AM  

kliq: shortdarkandmeh: kliq: I teach in Mississippi (NY native) and this campaign has been like living in an alternate reality. Both candidates paid millions of dollars to showcase how conservative they were. No one ever contemplated that Mississippi is an embarrassment to our country and that maybe progressive ideas should be given a shot?

I know you probably mean well, but blanket statements don't help. I do agree with the progressive ideas statement, though.

If my home state was 50th in every category, I'd be embarrassed.


If you really mean this statement, prepare to be embarrassed:  According to an article on HuffingtonPost.com, March 26, 2014, the most segregated school systems in America are in New York.
 
2014-06-26 10:37:47 AM  

shortdarkandmeh: Oh no, I've been judged by a self-appointed arbiter who thinks I have no right to post on a forum regarding my state. You've sure showed me. You must be one of them-thar Massholes I've heard about.
Actually, you're just a douche from Michigan who moved to Massachusetts and was bested by a Mississippian he considers beneath him. Congratulations. You are the Tom Brady of the Politics tab.


Wow, you're loving the attention, aren't you? When the government starts taking 25% of your taxes and sending it to Massachusetts, instead of the other way around, we can talk. Until then, you're just another red state moocher sponging off the states--almost exclusively blue--who pay their bills without whining and support you shiftless hoverrounders clinging to your guns and bibles.
 
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