If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(TreeHugger)   There is a thin line protecting all the World Cup fans in Brazil from dengue fever, and that line is made up of genetically modified mosquitoes   (treehugger.com) divider line 31
    More: Weird, Aedes aegypti, Fonseca, dengue fever, tree huggers, Ten Days  
•       •       •

2197 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Jun 2014 at 2:56 PM (26 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



31 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-25 10:16:26 AM  
I've had one of the milder forms of dengue fever, and it was like the worst flu I ever had only with mutant superpowers. At least I'm supposedly immune to that version for a good long while.
 
2014-06-25 02:58:52 PM  
See how GMO destroys natures food chain
 
2014-06-25 03:00:56 PM  
sure the GMO mosquitoes are protecting people from dengue but giving them cancer instead.
 
2014-06-25 03:02:23 PM  

kbronsito: sure the GMO mosquitoes are protecting people from dengue but giving them cancer instead.


sayof
 
2014-06-25 03:06:32 PM  

Sybarite: I've had one of the milder forms of dengue fever, and it was like the worst flu I ever had only with mutant superpowers. At least I'm supposedly immune to that version for a good long while.


Came here to say the same thing. Somehow drugged myself up enough to attend my wedding, the pics show my wife married a corpse. If I ever contracted the more serious strain, I'd almost rather be dead.
 
2014-06-25 03:07:33 PM  
GMM's
 
2014-06-25 03:08:06 PM  
GM mosquitoes? How long until they get recalled for defective wings?
 
2014-06-25 03:11:21 PM  
Mosquito bites are one thing, but let's hope FIFA does the right thing by isolating Luis Suarez...
 
2014-06-25 03:12:09 PM  
Dang.
 
2014-06-25 03:16:32 PM  
Helen Wallace, director of environmental group Gene Watch, recently said she was worried that these mosquitoes would mutate once released.

What could possibly go wrong?

i1.ytimg.com
 
2014-06-25 03:16:40 PM  
I've been trying to catch Dengue Fever for years.

graphics8.nytimes.com

And I would sleepwalk down her Mekong, if you know what I mean.
 
2014-06-25 03:25:12 PM  
Awesome. Let's do that to all (blood-sucking) mosquitoes now, not just this one species in Rio. They will not be missed.
 
2014-06-25 03:36:58 PM  
I noticed a change in the flavor of my soup last time I was down in Brazil.
 
2014-06-25 03:37:03 PM  

Whatthefark: GM mosquitoes? How long until they get recalled for defective wings?


Well done sir.
 
2014-06-25 03:45:48 PM  
Such a drastic change in population has been a major source of concern in the online community

I'll listen to the scientists over people who are worried sterile Mosquitos will pass on their damaged genes.  Plus, this critter apparently has absolutely no usefulness in nature except spreading disease.
 
2014-06-25 04:12:56 PM  

CruJones: Such a drastic change in population has been a major source of concern in the online community

I'll listen to the scientists over people who are worried sterile Mosquitos will pass on their damaged genes.  Plus, this critter apparently has absolutely no usefulness in nature except spreading disease.


Endangered species!

www.quotesworthrepeating.com
 
2014-06-25 04:28:11 PM  

Dorf11: Sybarite: I've had one of the milder forms of dengue fever, and it was like the worst flu I ever had only with mutant superpowers. At least I'm supposedly immune to that version for a good long while.

Came here to say the same thing. Somehow drugged myself up enough to attend my wedding, the pics show my wife married a corpse. If I ever contracted the more serious strain, I'd almost rather be dead.


A gun runner's life in the Congo is a tough lot. But I salute you for following through ..
 
2014-06-25 04:33:57 PM  

macadamnut: I've been trying to catch Dengue Fever for years.

[graphics8.nytimes.com image 600x300]

And I would sleepwalk down her Mekong, if you know what I mean.


Came here to say this.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QRxlO603yg
 
2014-06-25 04:38:36 PM  

CruJones: Such a drastic change in population has been a major source of concern in the online community

I'll listen to the scientists over people who are worried sterile Mosquitos will pass on their damaged genes.  Plus, this critter apparently has absolutely no usefulness in nature except spreading disease.


Spreading disease is incredibly important in nature, dummy. You ever heard of a Malthusian deadlock?
 
2014-06-25 05:03:58 PM  
Is there such a thing as a GMOoker? Cause a hooker with immunity would be a good thing. Except in court. Then not so good.
 
2014-06-25 06:03:20 PM  

Sybarite: I've had one of the milder forms of dengue fever, and it was like the worst flu I ever had only with mutant superpowers. At least I'm supposedly immune to that version for a good long while.


Me too, but there are 4 strains of it so we can still get it three more times.
 
2014-06-25 06:19:52 PM  

Gyrfalcon: CruJones: Such a drastic change in population has been a major source of concern in the online community

I'll listen to the scientists over people who are worried sterile Mosquitos will pass on their damaged genes.  Plus, this critter apparently has absolutely no usefulness in nature except spreading disease.

Spreading disease is incredibly important in nature, dummy. You ever heard of a Malthusian deadlock?


If you're worried about human overpopulation, kill yourself. You don't get to make that choice for anyone else, and refusing to address problems which cause suffering and death for others is effectively the same. Besides, the Malthusian deadlock (a dubious idea to begin with) may have been "overcome" by disease once, but the premise was population outstripping its capacity to feed itself which sorts itself out rather neatly: the population can no longer grow.
 
2014-06-25 07:48:47 PM  

NobleHam: Gyrfalcon: CruJones: Such a drastic change in population has been a major source of concern in the online community

I'll listen to the scientists over people who are worried sterile Mosquitos will pass on their damaged genes.  Plus, this critter apparently has absolutely no usefulness in nature except spreading disease.

Spreading disease is incredibly important in nature, dummy. You ever heard of a Malthusian deadlock?

If you're worried about human overpopulation, kill yourself. You don't get to make that choice for anyone else, and refusing to address problems which cause suffering and death for others is effectively the same. Besides, the Malthusian deadlock (a dubious idea to begin with) may have been "overcome" by disease once, but the premise was population outstripping its capacity to feed itself which sorts itself out rather neatly: the population can no longer grow.


Humans aren't the only ones who get diseases. And not the only population that needs pruning now and then. Distemper is a population control for wild canines. Bubonic plague is a control for rodents. Malaria and dengue are controls on wild primates.

Eradicating mosquitoes because they make HUMANS uncomfortable would make life pretty damn difficult for all the other things on this planet, unless you like the idea of being overrun by mice with no way to kill them off.
 
2014-06-25 08:48:03 PM  
I was wondering why I didn't seem to get bit that much here... Yay for science!

/still DEETing and taking my malaria pills
//tonic water tastes good to me now
///USA USA USA (hoping for win tomorrow, so Ghana can destroy the Portuguese with no worries)
 
2014-06-25 09:51:13 PM  

NobleHam: but the premise was population outstripping its capacity to feed itself which sorts itself out rather neatly: the population can no longer grow.

and suffers massive casualties due to resource depletion that effects more than just the "too much" population.

Fixed.  Think of it like a boom and a bust in a stock market.  The bust can sometimes leave you in a worst spot than you were before the boom.  And most non-sociopaths would like to avoid the busting part when it comes to human life.

I do agree overpopulation is no longer a concern, but it's because of technological breakthroughs with contraception, enlightened masses through family planning and figuring out half their kids weren't dying as infants anymore, and shifting economics that make children a financial burden.  And most of the alarmist literature about overpopulation was from a time when it was not inevitable that these things were going to happen to a significant enough degree to have an impact.
 
2014-06-26 12:22:35 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Humans aren't the only ones who get diseases. And not the only population that needs pruning now and then. Distemper is a population control for wild canines. Bubonic plague is a control for rodents. Malaria and dengue are controls on wild primates.

Eradicating mosquitoes because they make HUMANS uncomfortable would make life pretty damn difficult for all the other things on this planet, unless you like the idea of being overrun by mice with no way to kill them off.


I've never used a mosquito to kill a mouse in my life. People have been controlling mouse populations without the help of mosquitoes for thousands of years. And if we were capable of eradicating mosquitoes, which at this point we probably aren't, we'd probably be able to manage if those uppity wild primates or canines managed to have an overpopulation crisis. Mosquitoes are not essential to any ecosystem.
 
2014-06-26 12:24:17 AM  
And we're not talking about discomfort. We're talking about the animal most dangerous to human life (other than humans, maybe).
 
2014-06-26 09:14:29 AM  

NobleHam: Gyrfalcon: CruJones: Such a drastic change in population has been a major source of concern in the online community

I'll listen to the scientists over people who are worried sterile Mosquitos will pass on their damaged genes.  Plus, this critter apparently has absolutely no usefulness in nature except spreading disease.

Spreading disease is incredibly important in nature, dummy. You ever heard of a Malthusian deadlock?

If you're worried about human overpopulation, kill yourself. You don't get to make that choice for anyone else, and refusing to address problems which cause suffering and death for others is effectively the same. Besides, the Malthusian deadlock (a dubious idea to begin with) may have been "overcome" by disease once, but the premise was population outstripping its capacity to feed itself which sorts itself out rather neatly: the population can no longer grow.


This
 
2014-06-26 09:55:03 AM  

NobleHam: Gyrfalcon: Humans aren't the only ones who get diseases. And not the only population that needs pruning now and then. Distemper is a population control for wild canines. Bubonic plague is a control for rodents. Malaria and dengue are controls on wild primates.

Eradicating mosquitoes because they make HUMANS uncomfortable would make life pretty damn difficult for all the other things on this planet, unless you like the idea of being overrun by mice with no way to kill them off.

I've never used a mosquito to kill a mouse in my life. People have been controlling mouse populations without the help of mosquitoes for thousands of years. And if we were capable of eradicating mosquitoes, which at this point we probably aren't, we'd probably be able to manage if those uppity wild primates or canines managed to have an overpopulation crisis. Mosquitoes are not essential to any ecosystem.


Interesting look at that very point; well-balanced, imho:

http://www.nature.com/news/2010/100721/full/466432a.html

Quote: "Without mosquitoes, thousands of plant species would lose a group of pollinators. Adults depend on nectar for energy (only females of some species need a meal of blood to get the proteins necessary to lay eggs). Yet McAllister says that their pollination isn't crucial for crops on which humans depend."
 
2014-06-26 10:36:11 AM  

PunGent: Quote: "Without mosquitoes, thousands of plant species would lose a group of pollinators. Adults depend on nectar for energy (only females of some species need a meal of blood to get the proteins necessary to lay eggs). Yet McAllister says that their pollination isn't crucial for crops on which humans depend."


I think I've read that article. In any case, I've seen the quote before, but the important thing to note is that those mosquitoes which are important pollinators are not from any of the blood-sucking species. The ones that don't bite and spread disease can stay, the blood-sucking ones can go without any significant impact.
 
2014-06-26 10:43:29 AM  

Dorf11: Sybarite: I've had one of the milder forms of dengue fever, and it was like the worst flu I ever had only with mutant superpowers. At least I'm supposedly immune to that version for a good long while.

Came here to say the same thing. Somehow drugged myself up enough to attend my wedding, the pics show my wife married a corpse. If I ever contracted the more serious strain, I'd almost rather be dead.


Same here- I was pretty sure I was going to die on a Singapore hotel's bathroom floor wearing just my underwear. Kind of like David Carradine. I somehow managed to muster up enough energy to get on a plane and fly for 18 hours with it, afterwards my kidneys hurt so bad I couldn't stand up straight. Stubbornness kept from going to a foreign hospital, and I suspect kept me from dying because even that seemed like too much effort.
 
Displayed 31 of 31 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter





In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report