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(Marketwatch)   The average monthly cable bill is now predicted to reach $200 by 2020. It's time to bundle up   ( marketwatch.com) divider line
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1444 clicks; posted to Business » on 25 Jun 2014 at 1:58 AM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

2014-06-24 11:47:11 PM  
8 votes:
Or I can just pay for an internet connection, and forget about cable entirely.
2014-06-25 09:32:34 AM  
3 votes:
When I cancelled my cable, the "account retention specialist" I got to chat with repeatedly asked why i was canceling cable, and I told her that I was no longer willing to pay to receive ads, along with my content, and that the "new media" model of the internet has ushered in an age where, generally, if you are willing to devote your time to watching an ad, you get the content for free, since you "paid for it" with your time. She didn't get it. She asked if I found the ads themselves offensive, and I said "Yes, but not in the way you're thinking about it. They're offensive because when I look at my cable bill and see I'm spending $60/mo for cable TV, what I'm actually doing is spending $40/mo on actual TV, and $20/mo for you to pipe me ads that I have to spend time watching, if I watch live TV."

"So...are the ads too violent, or do they use foul language...?"

"You still aren't getting it. Let me put it this way: if you bought a season of a TV show, and instead of the shows, you got discs full of ads. 100% advertising, no show. You would be irritated, yes? Probably wouldn't buy those DVDs?"

"What?"

"So let's say the DVDs (that you have paid for) are only 90% ads. Still irritating?

"Uh."

"Well, what if they're "only" 50% ads? That's obviously better, right?"

"I'm not sure..."

"If 50% is good, then 30% must be better! If they're only 30% ads, you'd have no problem paying for them then, right?"

"Pay for ads instead of a TV show? Why?"

"It sounds like you understand why I want to cancel my cable now."
2014-06-24 11:45:17 PM  
3 votes:
I'm making arrangements to drop Time Warner completely.
$143 a month for cable, HBO, and internet, and it works whenever it feels like it.
I don't need 12 shopping channels, over 70 sports channels that I couldn't give a rat's ass about (right now they're showing JV high school soccer on one of the channels), and several pay channels featuring 30 year old movies.

I've changed boxes 3 times, and I still have to reboot this Cisco based piece of crap at least once a day.
My internet speeds are crap for fully 1/2 the day despite having the the best modem available and a squeaky clean i7 with no bloatware.
2014-06-25 06:22:55 PM  
2 votes:
R       O       K      U.com


is all i have to say.  Thank you Lord of Internet and Content without F*cking Cable TV and its worthless commercials.


i've forgotten about cable TV and Satellite ever since.
2014-06-25 09:28:44 AM  
2 votes:

StopLurkListen: When I first moved into this box canyon I installed an unpowered analog antenna on the roof -- haha! No way. I could only get one station's signal from San Jose, 30 miles away. Otherwise, the hills blocked the much closer San Francisco signals.

I'd be willing to try a powered HD antenna and see if it's any better. The Mohu Sky antenna is expensive ... sorta. It's only one month's cable bill.

Anyone have any experience with powered HD antennas in hill country? Thanks!


The best thing you can do is go to tvfool.com and put in your address (or preferably coordinates) and see what comes up. Then run the same thing adding antenna height of 10, 20, 30 feet. You might get away with an amplified antenna on the roof, or you might need to go batty with a tower in the yard.

If you want a new, weird mix of channels, try an FTA dish. You buy the dish, pick a satellite to look at, and get a receiver. You won't get many channels you've heard of, and it can be a hobby at times (looking for different satellites, adding more dishes, setting up a motorized system) but $200ish will get you your first dish and receiver.

SatelliteGuys FTA Section (may want adblock)
dishpointer
2014-06-25 08:57:58 AM  
2 votes:

havana_joe: dookdookdook: havana_joe: With cable it's just so much easier to scroll through channels or the listings and find something to put on.

See, what you need isn't cable, it's a white noise machine.

I don't think so... My point is that with cable it takes me 10 seconds and 1 remote control to have something up on the screen. With Netflix it takes 3 remotes and 60 seconds to be in the search menu. If there is something I want to watch I have no problem going to Netflix and looking for it; when I just want to sit in my chair after work and find something to relax to I go to cable because the process requires less thought and time.


If you commit to Netflix, you change your viewing habits. Instead of searching for different things to watch each day, you pick a show and you plow through it over several nights/weeks. This month you're going to be watching all of Buffy or Futurama, 2 or 3 episodes at a sitting. Oh, Season 3 of Bob's Burgers dropped, you'll power through those this week before getting back to, say, Red Dwarf.

It takes a bit of adjustment, as it's essentially breaking the "Tuesdays I watch Lost, Mondays I watch True Blood" model, but it can be done.
2014-06-25 01:31:31 AM  
2 votes:
I gave up cable 4 years ago. Never looked back except for sports, and hey, you find other things to do.
2014-06-25 12:14:25 AM  
2 votes:
In other news...the average consumer will say "Fark that" and go to over the air antenna and internet for movies and TV series.
2014-06-25 06:35:48 PM  
1 vote:
Here is is. Homies.    Read and Weep.


50/3 Mbps Internet = 50 smacks/month

Roku  = 100 smacks to purchase. they range from 50 to 100 for the best one. the size of a hockey puck. no moving parts.

Netflix = 8 smacks per month

Hulu Plus = 8 smacks per month

YouTube = Free

and about 1000 other mostly free channels to choose from.    98% of Commercials GONE.   GONE away.


Thank You.
2014-06-25 06:30:04 PM  
1 vote:

hubiestubert: Or I can just pay for an internet connection, and forget about cable entirely.



slap a Roku on that biatch and have it both ways.  Have your Cake and eat it too.
2014-06-25 06:26:46 PM  
1 vote:

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Roku



yea, that works. but remember, you'll bust your monthly ISP cap sooner, depending on if you have a cap and how much it is.

Roku delivered me from the Evil.    i sure miss all those mindless commercials too.  did i mention it's much cheaper too??
2014-06-25 06:24:12 PM  
1 vote:

Raoul Eaton: Comcast keeps trying to get me to put my phone on their service.  I ask them "why would I put my phone on my most unreliable service provider"?  I need my phone to call Comcast when the Comcast connection is down.



Callcentric.com


Thank you Lord of All that is VOIP.   it finally set me free.
2014-06-25 03:00:35 PM  
1 vote:

Fark_Guy_Rob: Okay Buddy, tell me, where are you going to get your blazing fast high-speed internet connection that will allow you and your family to stream all this media?  What's that?  The CABLE COMPANY?  Or maybe you'll go to the PHONE COMPANY.  In either case, you'll be getting screwed, just like everyone else.  The last time I was in the US, ~4 years ago, with Comcast, internet only cost me $50 and internet only + basic cable was like $55.


That varies a lot by market.

We've got a reliable 30Mbps down, no caps, for $40/mo in St. Louis. I think that rate expires in two years and will eventually go up to $60/mo. Then we'll just switch to another provider and take advantage of their promo rate for a year or two.

I'm really hoping that Google Fiber makes it's way over from KC.
2014-06-25 01:53:50 PM  
1 vote:

mrmopar5287: If Netflix can start offering some streaming deals for a la carte pricing on individual TV channels that the cable companies refuse to offer, that could really take the wind out of their sails.


problem is in part the channels themselves.  To illustrate (based on 2001 knowledge) they say the following:

Channel 1 - 7.50 per month per customer AND 90% or more of your customers have access AND you have to carry Channel 1A or penalty rate
Channel 1A - 4.75 per month per customer AND 90% or more of your customers have access AND you have to carry Channel 1B or penalty rate
Channel 1B - 2.00 per month per customer AND 70% or more of your customers have access or penalty rate

Channel 2 - 1.00 per month per customer AND you have to carry Channel 3, Channel 4, Channel 14 and Channel xyz in the same tiers or get none

Channels 2, 3, 4, 14 & xyz are all owned by the same company, but the channels are likely unrelated in their content (i.e. Discovery, Spike & Scifi, etc "this not accurate for ownership)

Channel 1* can bully you like this cause they cover sports and much of your customer base will flee if you dont have them

in a nut shell, content providers can set these terms.  Also, just to be able to see their pricing, you have to sign a non-disclosure agreement to sit at the table, or they wont talk to you, especially if you contact through a broker/organization that represents content providers so you are negotiating with one party instead each and every channels and spending the money on lawyers for each and every contract.

with the above package deals in place, content providers can pad their wallets (so can the cable/SAT providers).  why do you think ala carte has never been done despite customer screaming for it for at least a decade?
2014-06-25 01:44:08 PM  
1 vote:

mrmopar5287: If Netflix can start offering some streaming deals for a la carte pricing on individual TV channels that the cable companies refuse to offer, that could really take the wind out of their sails.


Many of the cable networks won't allow that.  As example, Discovery Networks supposedly requires that their Health, Destination, Heroes and Science channels all be packaged together.

Besides, à la carte TV has missed its time.  It should have been available 15-20 years ago with first generation digital cable boxes.  But now with video on demand services like Netflix, Amazon Prime, Google Play, the iStore and cable PPV, why bother paying for a channel when you only watch a few shows on it?  Just pay for the shows directly.
2014-06-25 12:14:34 PM  
1 vote:
Everyone knows cable is going away, but don't think for a second that the companies will let you save money while enjoying what they provide. Things are already changing. Internet prices will go up, caps are already going in place, and the biggest of all, they've pretty much killed net neutrality. Brag all you want about how you watch Netflix and the like, but don't think for a second that the media companies will let this continue without getting what they feel is their cut.
2014-06-25 12:05:30 PM  
1 vote:
$2400 a year is insane. You can lease a car for less than that.

I got rid of cable seven years ago and don't miss it at all. I pay about $150-200 a year for online streaming and get exactly what I want.
2014-06-25 11:24:12 AM  
1 vote:

Slam Bradley: I just bought the antenna yesterday. I think we are both (wife and I) ready to cut the cord. The major test will be in August when Dr. Who comes back. I can't for the life of me find a way to stream current episodes of Dr. Who without resorting to the dark arts of the internet.


I'm in the same boat. Which is why we usually have to wait until they come out on DVD. (And then we borrow them from the local library.) If it's something we want to watch immediately, such as the 50th anniversary special or the Christmas special, we suck it up and buy it from Amazon.

But I actually prefer waiting for it to come out on DVD and watching it all at once, so I plan to wait for the first Capaldi season to finish and then grab the disks.

Cut the cord a year ago, and while there are things I miss, I'm very happy. If I could just switch over to just a pure internet service and not have to go through AT&T, I'd be even happier.
2014-06-25 10:44:50 AM  
1 vote:
I don't know if lots of people know this about Roku but you can set the minimum Mbps on your box.

Press the HOME button 5 times
Press the REWIND button 3 times
Press the FORWARD button 2 times.

Then move from automatic to the highest speed (I think it's 3.5 which should be all HD).

It seems to have gotten rid of much of the pixelation--YouTube is never a guarantee because the posted videos aren't always the best quality.  Sometimes it tends to hand before loading. YMMV.

Here's a video on YouTube about it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXdMmpQerFA

And you don't have to enable debugging.
2014-06-25 10:20:54 AM  
1 vote:
In related news, the Supreme Court just ruled that Aereo is illegal.
2014-06-25 10:11:39 AM  
1 vote:

qorkfiend: muck1969: at some point content providers (Disney, HBO, TBS, etal) will begin to challenge any laws governing subscriptions through cable providers,

I doubt it. Immensely popular channels like that are paid enormous amounts of money to be carried on the cable networks (and in HBO's case, on top of their premium subscription fees). Someone like ESPN makes the majority of their revenue from "subscription fees" paid by the cable companies. Under the current arrangement, you're paying to subscribe to ESPN even if you don't watch ESPN. There's no reason for ESPN to change that.


That model is ending.  HBO knows it.  ESPN knows it.  Which is why both are building up their online presences.  And these days cable companies make more on their ISP services than they do on traditional TV.
2014-06-25 09:50:57 AM  
1 vote:

hej: Google Fiber with all the channels under the sun is $120.


Cost of Google Fiber = $120
Cost of Not Living in Kansas = Priceless
2014-06-25 08:22:34 AM  
1 vote:

padraig: 210 dollars for cable ? What the hell is wrong with America ?


That people pay $210/month for cable.
2014-06-25 06:08:16 AM  
1 vote:
Cable bill? What's a cable bill?
2014-06-25 02:58:42 AM  
1 vote:
Yup, as soon as your "introductory period" gets ready to expire, call to cancel you're service and say your moving to satellite or cutting the cable. 9 times out of 10, they'll give you a much, much better deal.

I got rid of my cable TV quite a while ago and get my TV from Hulu/Netflix. I called up Centurylink to cancel my DSL and told them I was moving to Comcast's internet service and quoted their latest deal to sign up. Centurylink gave me 40 megs down 20 meg up for $19 a month - 12 months, which I'm plenty happy with.

Throw in the $9 a month Netflix, and the HD OTA broadcasts and I'm getting all the entertainment I can watch for under $30.

Anyone who pays more than $200 a month for TV/internet is simply a chump.
2014-06-25 02:21:30 AM  
1 vote:

hubiestubert: Or I can just pay for an internet connection, and forget about cable entirely.


'sup, overage charges?
Every American ISP is going to have laughable data caps within two years, so good luck trying to watch more than eight streaming movies a month or, like, any Youtube.
2014-06-25 02:05:35 AM  
1 vote:

RussianPooper: I gave up cable 4 years ago. Never looked back except for sports, and hey, you find other things to do ways to watch.


FTFM.
2014-06-25 01:37:57 AM  
1 vote:

AverageAmericanGuy: Back in 2011 after the Fukushima nuclear plant meltdown, the Japanese pitched in and did what they could to conserve power. Tokyo went dark with famous landmarks like the crosswalk in Shibuya with multiple video screens and bright neon lights turning off for several months. We all tried to do our best to use only what we absolutely needed so that the diminished power supply could be shared by all.

A month of this conservation had a huge impact on the overall usage. Tepco realized that the conservation had led to lower power bills which in turn meant lower bonuses for Tepco employees. So in order to make up the shortfall, they raised rates on everyone.

The same thing is happening here. A company that should, by all rights, be seeing lower revenues is gouging their customers to make up for the inevitable decline of subscribers. It works in the complete opposite direction you'd expect supply and demand to work. It's disgusting and customers really should drop their service.


Wow that is interesting.  I did not know that (about Japanese power conservation).

Lower subscription rates could affect more than just cable prices though, it could affect the availability of content.  I can but hope that means less inane realtiy television and better internet TV (the content by streaming services has been pretty good so far).
2014-06-25 01:18:18 AM  
1 vote:
I dumped cable a decade ago when Adelphia raised my rates from $78/month for all digital channels and HBO to $130. They called me to make it sound like a good thing because I had their new 'Gold Package' deal which would 'only cost' $130/month. I told them I liked the rates I was at and didn't plan on changing anything. They said to keep the rates I was at, I'd need to dump the Digital channel box, HBO and take a pared down version of their Bronze package that would be without certain Sports channels like ESPN or 'extended program channels' like Cartoon Network and History Network. Basically, the 3 channels I watched outside of HBO. I told them to stuff it, cancelled the TV and internet and went to our local Telephone company for DSL.

Adelphia turned into Comcast/XFinity, and I refuse to pay for it. I have Netflix, Amazon Prime and Hulu+ for all my viewing needs.
2014-06-25 01:16:18 AM  
1 vote:
Back in 2011 after the Fukushima nuclear plant meltdown, the Japanese pitched in and did what they could to conserve power. Tokyo went dark with famous landmarks like the crosswalk in Shibuya with multiple video screens and bright neon lights turning off for several months. We all tried to do our best to use only what we absolutely needed so that the diminished power supply could be shared by all.

A month of this conservation had a huge impact on the overall usage. Tepco realized that the conservation had led to lower power bills which in turn meant lower bonuses for Tepco employees. So in order to make up the shortfall, they raised rates on everyone.

The same thing is happening here. A company that should, by all rights, be seeing lower revenues is gouging their customers to make up for the inevitable decline of subscribers. It works in the complete opposite direction you'd expect supply and demand to work. It's disgusting and customers really should drop their service.
2014-06-25 12:24:59 AM  
1 vote:

TuteTibiImperes: I'm paying closer to $300/month right now when you factor in Internet service.


Dude..for 300 bucks a month..is it really really worth it to see sweaty guys on a field trying to tackle each other.

And as for as HBO goes...sure it has some decent thing...but nothing you can't chill out for a year and get the DVDs from the local library.
2014-06-25 12:20:25 AM  
1 vote:

optikeye: In other news...the average consumer will say "Fark that" and go to over the air antenna and internet for movies and TV series.


I'm paying closer to $300/month right now when you factor in Internet service.  I could probably cut it back quite a bit if I went with Comcast for both and bundled instead of using Dish for TV and Comcast for Internet, but Comcast pissed me off so much with their TV service that I wanted nothing to do with them after I moved, and Dish has been awesome in terms of customer service.

I'd drop Comcast for Internet but their really the only game in town unless I want a craptastic DSL line.

I've been thinking about cutting the cord because I just don't watch that much TV anymore, maybe an hour or so after work each day.  The big things holding me back right now are HBO and NCAA football.  I'm a fan of an out-of-market team, so the only way I can see the games is by having the big sports package that gives me the out of market games.
2014-06-25 12:16:42 AM  
1 vote:

Relatively Obscure: hubiestubert: Or I can just pay for an internet connection, and forget about cable entirely.

I have cable because cable and internet cost me essentially the same as just internet, unless I wanted to downgrade to something like a 3-5 Mbps connection from the competition.


HAHAHAHAHA!

I only have Comcast.  $60 a month just for the lowest tier internet, or $70 for internet and TV.  I'm still seriously considering getting rid of the TV.

I'm not kidding - there isn't even DSL offered by anyone where I live.  Just Comcast cable internet, or Verizon wireless broadband modems that cap out at 10GB per month at $100.
2014-06-25 12:12:23 AM  
1 vote:

MaudlinMutantMollusk: I get about 30 channels for free

/I'm sure the cable companies are working hard to make sure that won't last long, too


I'm not sure they can, unless they change the law, but corporations have been known to do that sort of thing.

I used to run master control at a CBS affiliate about 15 years ago, and they were required to have the gear so that they never went off the air no matter what, because it was a matter of national, and civil defense.

They had the largest backup generator I've ever seen, and there was a generator at the transmitter site as well.
2014-06-24 11:56:09 PM  
1 vote:
What's cable?
2014-06-24 11:53:34 PM  
1 vote:
i wish my cable bill was only $200 a month.
 
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