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(Marketwatch)   The average monthly cable bill is now predicted to reach $200 by 2020. It's time to bundle up   (marketwatch.com) divider line 164
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1403 clicks; posted to Business » on 25 Jun 2014 at 1:58 AM (21 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-25 11:45:35 AM  
I don't understand how they get away with advertising prices that are so far from reality.  "some fees may apply"  Yeah, right.  The various fees, taxes etc balloon the price by 50% or more.  The price doesn't even include a single cable box rental, so right off the bat it's a lie.
 
2014-06-25 11:51:04 AM  

Alkoholiker: padraig: MmmmBacon: SlothB77: i wish my cable bill was only $200 a month.

I was paying about $210 when I dumped cable TV entirely last year. I've been doing only Cable Internet since, and that is still overpriced at $76.95/month for 50Mbps down and 12Mbps down.

210 dollars for cable ? What the hell is wrong with America ?

35€ for HD and sports package. 150mbps


Yeah, but you guys don't have the Free Market like we do! Dirty commies!
 
2014-06-25 11:53:51 AM  
The average monthly cable bill is now predicted to reach $200 by 2020.

Yeah, I had to dump mine when it got to $190 two years ago, but kept DSL internet. Having that extra $125/mo sure does come in handy.
 
2014-06-25 11:56:26 AM  

grinding_journalist: pueblonative: No snark, but if more people follow your path I'm guessing we're going to hear a slew of stories about people complaining about receiving their fifth copyright violation notice after going to youtube, or why their internet is as slow as fark yet costs almost as much as their old cable bill. And that "new media" model sounds a lot like the old broadcasting standard.

Except for the part where you didn't have to pay for broadcast TV. Not that you do now for OTA stuff, but how many people are actually getting "broadcast" TV from an antenna these days?


So it now sounds like cable in the old days.  How long did that remain relatively ad free?  You honestly think those ad companies aren't going to go after people who have disposable income and who have proven that they will spend it?  You don't think they're not going to start increasing the number of commercials?  if I'm a salesman I'm actively looking for those people and how many ads I can pitch them.  The number of ads you have to watch to "pay" for your content is going to go up and up and up.


Why are you suggesting that people would start getting slammed for IP/copyright infringement by "cutting the cord" en masse? Underhanded retaliation from cable companies? As the revenue stream dries up, so will their power and influence.

It's not like those companies have nothing but spider webs in their war chest.  They have a fark ton of money, and as we see the merger of content producers with distributors (i.e. NBCUniversalComcastTime) they're gonna find ways to maintain the financial stream.  Maybe it's not something as blatantly obvious as a copyright warning.  Maybe you start getting cap warnings, or an extra ten dollars tacked onto your bill with a suggestion that if you want to trim your bill to go through streampix, which is included with your internet and doesn't impact your cap.  Or they just start raising the price of your internet.  Try to go with somebody else?  They're gonna get throttled.  They're going to get their money, one way or another.  Net neutrality?  We've already seen where that has gone.
 
2014-06-25 11:58:22 AM  

StopLurkListen: When I first moved into this box canyon I installed an unpowered analog antenna on the roof -- haha! No way. I could only get one station's signal from San Jose, 30 miles away. Otherwise, the hills blocked the much closer San Francisco signals.

Anyone have any experience with powered HD antennas in hill country? Thanks!


You need to get a mast tower to get your antenna up higher.  The hills are blocking your signal and an amplifier won't help.  You'll just amplify signals that have been distorted by the hills.
 
2014-06-25 11:59:20 AM  

Target Builder: lilplatinum: Target Builder: With a bit of luck we'll see college sports turn into amateur athletics for students to play recreationally and have the current NFL training camp teams split off into a second division professional league.

Yeah, then we can move away from the boredom of college football and turn it into the excitement of AAA baseball or the D-League!

You'd have the same athletes playing the same sport.


You would have far less of them and nobody would give a shiat because they aren't affiliated with schools.  No one gives a shiat about any other minor league, other than maybe to ocassionally see a cheap baseball game on dollar beer or hotdog night.  Take college out of football and it would be ignored like every other minor or semi professional league.
 
2014-06-25 12:05:30 PM  
$2400 a year is insane. You can lease a car for less than that.

I got rid of cable seven years ago and don't miss it at all. I pay about $150-200 a year for online streaming and get exactly what I want.
 
2014-06-25 12:07:30 PM  

dascott: I don't understand how they get away with advertising prices that are so far from reality.  "some fees may apply"  Yeah, right.  The various fees, taxes etc balloon the price by 50% or more.  The price doesn't even include a single cable box rental, so right off the bat it's a lie.


I remember when Comcast started promising digital adapters free for as long as you had the service. . .or until the FCC ruled that it was legal to encrypt your signals, whichever came first.  Guess which came first?
 
2014-06-25 12:14:34 PM  
Everyone knows cable is going away, but don't think for a second that the companies will let you save money while enjoying what they provide. Things are already changing. Internet prices will go up, caps are already going in place, and the biggest of all, they've pretty much killed net neutrality. Brag all you want about how you watch Netflix and the like, but don't think for a second that the media companies will let this continue without getting what they feel is their cut.
 
2014-06-25 12:15:45 PM  

Slam Bradley: I just bought the antenna yesterday.  I think we are both (wife and I) ready to cut the cord.  The major test will be in August when Dr. Who comes back.  I can't for the life of me find a way to stream current episodes of Dr. Who without resorting to the dark arts of the internet.

/Red Sox picked a good season to really phone it in so I am not feeling horrible about missing sports at the moment


VPN for $5/month & BBC iPlayer.
 
2014-06-25 12:30:57 PM  

HempHead: Slam Bradley: I just bought the antenna yesterday.  I think we are both (wife and I) ready to cut the cord.  The major test will be in August when Dr. Who comes back.  I can't for the life of me find a way to stream current episodes of Dr. Who without resorting to the dark arts of the internet.

/Red Sox picked a good season to really phone it in so I am not feeling horrible about missing sports at the moment

VPN for $5/month & BBC iPlayer.


Data caps really don't care how many boxy-proxies you hide behind.
 
2014-06-25 12:33:33 PM  

dascott: I don't understand how they get away with advertising prices that are so far from reality.  "some fees may apply"  Yeah, right.  The various fees, taxes etc balloon the price by 50% or more.  The price doesn't even include a single cable box rental, so right off the bat it's a lie.


That's what infuriated me in the USA : the hidden fees. The price advertised NEVER was the price you'd pay.
 
2014-06-25 12:37:42 PM  

pueblonative: HempHead: Slam Bradley: I just bought the antenna yesterday.  I think we are both (wife and I) ready to cut the cord.  The major test will be in August when Dr. Who comes back.  I can't for the life of me find a way to stream current episodes of Dr. Who without resorting to the dark arts of the internet.

/Red Sox picked a good season to really phone it in so I am not feeling horrible about missing sports at the moment

VPN for $5/month & BBC iPlayer.

Data caps really don't care how many boxy-proxies you hide behind.


How big can an episode of Dr Who be?

BBC iPlayer even gives you the option to stream SD or HD.
 
2014-06-25 12:45:19 PM  

hubiestubert: Or I can just pay for an internet connection, and forget about cable entirely.


Pretty much this. Two hundred channels of nothing I want to watch and two channels of occasionally decent programming is not a good value proposition. Better to pay for Netflix, Hulu, and Crunchyroll for the kid.

I'm surprised their business model has lasted this long but with the proliferation of content providers offering their own streaming services the days of the cable company in its current form are numbered which is probably why their looking to screw with net neutrality so they can start squeezing content providers as well as their traditional customers.
 
2014-06-25 12:50:46 PM  
Dumped my cable when it got to $150.  Only reason why I kept it as long as I did was because the wife watches her Asian soap operas during the day, and Comcast won't let you add those channels without buying their premium cable package.  Thankfully, Dish came along and offered DishWorld app for iPads/iPhones for $15/month, not satellite or cable needed.

Now my wife watches all her same shows, and with the app mirrored on Apple TV, the quality and sharpness is actually even better than what Comcast was providing.  Saving us $100 per month (Internet and DishWorld/Hulu/Netflix/Amazon Prime only).  That is practically two trips to Disneyland each year.
 
2014-06-25 01:02:18 PM  
I have 30Mbps interwebs for like $51 after taxes.  No cable TV.
 
2014-06-25 01:10:43 PM  
If Netflix can start offering some streaming deals for a la carte pricing on individual TV channels that the cable companies refuse to offer, that could really take the wind out of their sails.
 
2014-06-25 01:36:21 PM  

HempHead: pueblonative: HempHead: Slam Bradley: I just bought the antenna yesterday.  I think we are both (wife and I) ready to cut the cord.  The major test will be in August when Dr. Who comes back.  I can't for the life of me find a way to stream current episodes of Dr. Who without resorting to the dark arts of the internet.

/Red Sox picked a good season to really phone it in so I am not feeling horrible about missing sports at the moment

VPN for $5/month & BBC iPlayer.

Data caps really don't care how many boxy-proxies you hide behind.

How big can an episode of Dr Who be?

BBC iPlayer even gives you the option to stream SD or HD.



Tom Baker alone as the doctor is around 30 gigs in 480p...

then you have steam summer sales which rape your bandwidth as much as your wallet

and the icing on the cake is there are isp's who say, and get quite offended when you point out their bullshi@t, "25GB/mo is more than anyone should ever need... but just in case here is 10GB more (one time transaction for the month it is purchased in) for $15.
 
2014-06-25 01:40:55 PM  
The only cable shows I watch are nature / science / history things on Discovery, National Geographic, Animal Planet, etc.Unfortunately, Hulu, Netflix, etc do not carry those type of shows. Is there any way I can still watch those shows without cable? Or does cable have me by the balls?
 
2014-06-25 01:44:08 PM  

mrmopar5287: If Netflix can start offering some streaming deals for a la carte pricing on individual TV channels that the cable companies refuse to offer, that could really take the wind out of their sails.


Many of the cable networks won't allow that.  As example, Discovery Networks supposedly requires that their Health, Destination, Heroes and Science channels all be packaged together.

Besides, à la carte TV has missed its time.  It should have been available 15-20 years ago with first generation digital cable boxes.  But now with video on demand services like Netflix, Amazon Prime, Google Play, the iStore and cable PPV, why bother paying for a channel when you only watch a few shows on it?  Just pay for the shows directly.
 
2014-06-25 01:47:41 PM  

MBA Whore: The only cable shows I watch are nature / science / history things on Discovery, National Geographic, Animal Planet, etc.Unfortunately, Hulu, Netflix, etc do not carry those type of shows. Is there any way I can still watch those shows without cable? Or does cable have me by the balls?


The PBS app on my xbox has a ton of Nature shows, and there are a crap load of documentaries on Netflix
 
2014-06-25 01:53:50 PM  

mrmopar5287: If Netflix can start offering some streaming deals for a la carte pricing on individual TV channels that the cable companies refuse to offer, that could really take the wind out of their sails.


problem is in part the channels themselves.  To illustrate (based on 2001 knowledge) they say the following:

Channel 1 - 7.50 per month per customer AND 90% or more of your customers have access AND you have to carry Channel 1A or penalty rate
Channel 1A - 4.75 per month per customer AND 90% or more of your customers have access AND you have to carry Channel 1B or penalty rate
Channel 1B - 2.00 per month per customer AND 70% or more of your customers have access or penalty rate

Channel 2 - 1.00 per month per customer AND you have to carry Channel 3, Channel 4, Channel 14 and Channel xyz in the same tiers or get none

Channels 2, 3, 4, 14 & xyz are all owned by the same company, but the channels are likely unrelated in their content (i.e. Discovery, Spike & Scifi, etc "this not accurate for ownership)

Channel 1* can bully you like this cause they cover sports and much of your customer base will flee if you dont have them

in a nut shell, content providers can set these terms.  Also, just to be able to see their pricing, you have to sign a non-disclosure agreement to sit at the table, or they wont talk to you, especially if you contact through a broker/organization that represents content providers so you are negotiating with one party instead each and every channels and spending the money on lawyers for each and every contract.

with the above package deals in place, content providers can pad their wallets (so can the cable/SAT providers).  why do you think ala carte has never been done despite customer screaming for it for at least a decade?
 
2014-06-25 02:06:32 PM  

Dinjiin: Besides, à la carte TV has missed its time.  It should have been available 15-20 years ago with first generation digital cable boxes.  But now with video on demand services like Netflix, Amazon Prime, Google Play, the iStore and cable PPV, why bother paying for a channel when you only watch a few shows on it?  Just pay for the shows directly.


There is something to be said about having ESPN and other sports networks for live sporting events.  I bet there are a lot of people who would love to buy the NFL Sunday Ticket thing without having to have DirecTV with all the other channels and instead just get it through Netflix.
 
2014-06-25 02:21:30 PM  

Enuratique: /seriously though, Popcorn Time is the shiz


I thought they shut down Popcorn Time after one awesome week? I kept the app installed up until a couple of weeks ago, but every time I started it up it never worked. The screen would only be blank.

/we'll always have vodly.too
//maybe PT has been blocked in the US
 
2014-06-25 02:24:18 PM  
Funny, I already over-pay that.  But I'm a fool and too lazy to figure out how to get off the "FIOS-grid".
 
2014-06-25 02:27:57 PM  

mrmopar5287: Dinjiin: Besides, à la carte TV has missed its time.  It should have been available 15-20 years ago with first generation digital cable boxes.  But now with video on demand services like Netflix, Amazon Prime, Google Play, the iStore and cable PPV, why bother paying for a channel when you only watch a few shows on it?  Just pay for the shows directly.

There is something to be said about having ESPN and other sports networks for live sporting events.  I bet there are a lot of people who would love to buy the NFL Sunday Ticket thing without having to have DirecTV with all the other channels and instead just get it through Netflix.


Pretty much this...sports is the only thing keeping us from cutting the cord entirely.

However, if you have more than one major cable provider in your area, you can just switch back and forth every year or two, and get a "new customer" discount. They count on customers just staying once the promo pricing runs out, because it's a minor hassle to switch. It's really not if you have web-based email. For instance, WOW is giving us extended basic (no HD), 15Mb internet, and phone for around $150/mo. Charter offered us all that, plus HD, plus 60Mb internet, plus all 3 HBO, all 3 Showtime, and all 3 Cinemax for a little over $100/mo, cable cards for the Tivos and a free DVR for the bedroom included. Guess who's coming out tomorrow to hook up? We'll stay with them for the 2 years that they guarantee the price, then either switch back to WOW or cut the cord entirely.

Oh, and there's no contract, so we can get out at any time.
 
2014-06-25 02:36:17 PM  
$200 cable bill?  Cute.  Project your home's real estate taxes out to 2020 or better yet, 2030

replygif.net
 
2014-06-25 02:55:15 PM  

Zeb Hesselgresser: $200 cable bill?  Cute.  Project your home's real estate taxes out to 2020 or better yet, 2030

[replygif.net image 245x163]


2020 is only 5 1/2 years away. Nothing should go up more than about 10-15% over that span without a specific cause.

I can't fathom the average cable bill being $200, and I'm hardly a "I don't own a TV" type. I have HD cable (not a premium package, but all the normal stuff, ESPN, etc), an HD DVR, and 50 Mbps internet for $104/mo. I don't know what I could add to make that $200 just 5 years from now, aside from upgrading to 500 Mbps internet which is like $500/mo and quite unnecessary.

There's got to be a lot of folks out there with just TV service paying $70/mo and I can't believe there are enough people paying $300+/mo to balance them out.
 
2014-06-25 02:56:44 PM  

MBA Whore: The only cable shows I watch are nature / science / history things on Discovery, National Geographic, Animal Planet, etc.Unfortunately, Hulu, Netflix, etc do not carry those type of shows. Is there any way I can still watch those shows without cable? Or does cable have me by the balls?


Maybe you're looking for very specific things, but Netflix has a tremendous amount of nature and science shows. Perhaps you haven't checked in a long time?

Searching on Netflix for "Discovery Channel" brings up at least 100 different shows- Mythbusters, Dirty Jobs, Into the Universe, dinosaur stuff, ocean stuff, more space stuff, more dinosaur stuff, etc.

They seem to have a weird fixation on Alaska...

Searching for National Geographic brings up over 200 shows, but a lot of those are one-off documentaries.

Searching for Animal Planet brings up about 20 or 30 shows.


I can't find a way for non-subscribers to search their streaming library, but their "Documentaries" page has a lot of that kind of stuff. Look for the titles with the Discover, Nat. Geo., and Animal Planet logos.

http://www.netflix.com/WiGenre?agid=6839
 
2014-06-25 02:58:14 PM  
I just saw that you can narrow the browsing to "Science and Nature Documentaries"

http://www.netflix.com/WiGenre?agid=2595&orderBy=su&pl=6839
 
2014-06-25 02:58:20 PM  
I always laugh when people are like, 'Hahaha cable TV?  Just ditch it and use the internet!'

Okay Buddy, tell me, where are you going to get your blazing fast high-speed internet connection that will allow you and your family to stream all this media?  What's that?  The CABLE COMPANY?  Or maybe you'll go to the PHONE COMPANY.  In either case, you'll be getting screwed, just like everyone else.  The last time I was in the US, ~4 years ago, with Comcast, internet only cost me $50 and internet only + basic cable was like $55.
 
2014-06-25 03:00:35 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Okay Buddy, tell me, where are you going to get your blazing fast high-speed internet connection that will allow you and your family to stream all this media?  What's that?  The CABLE COMPANY?  Or maybe you'll go to the PHONE COMPANY.  In either case, you'll be getting screwed, just like everyone else.  The last time I was in the US, ~4 years ago, with Comcast, internet only cost me $50 and internet only + basic cable was like $55.


That varies a lot by market.

We've got a reliable 30Mbps down, no caps, for $40/mo in St. Louis. I think that rate expires in two years and will eventually go up to $60/mo. Then we'll just switch to another provider and take advantage of their promo rate for a year or two.

I'm really hoping that Google Fiber makes it's way over from KC.
 
2014-06-25 03:18:26 PM  

dookdookdook: havana_joe: With cable it's just so much easier to scroll through channels or the listings and find something to put on.

See, what you need isn't cable, it's a white noise machine.


this. I got rid of cable 8 years ago and have found that I no longer lose afternoons watching Waterworld on the couch. My children don't have a set TV time schedule based upon the aired programming, they have to actively seek out what they want to see. Honestly, that is the biggest upside to it.
 
2014-06-25 03:41:29 PM  
Internet streaming only is not currently a viable alternative to cable television for any real TV watcher. The content is simply not there. The majority of cable stations do not make their shows available streaming to people that can't prove they subscribe to cable. The few shows that do stream on Hulu are often edited, and full of just as many ads as if you were to watch on TV. The content on Netflix is mostly stale, and takes a long time to get updated. Slow connection speeds and data caps make streaming not viable for many people. I have AT&T DSL, and heaven forbid I should want to watch something on Netflix while browsing something that is even slightly data heavy in the internet, forget about it, nothing works.

So yeah, cutting the cord is fine if you don't like watching TV in the first place, don't mind waiting (sometimes a long time) to see new episodes of the shows you watch, and have an internet connection to support streaming. Unfortunately for those of us that like sports or shows on cable, streaming just isn't a viable option as of yet, without resorting to illegal downloads or streaming. I have the cheapest tier available from DirecTV and I pay less than $50 a month, and it's fine.
 
2014-06-25 03:42:10 PM  

TommyymmoT: I'm making arrangements to drop Time Warner completely.
$143 a month for cable, HBO, and internet, and it works whenever it feels like it.
I don't need 12 shopping channels, over 70 sports channels that I couldn't give a rat's ass about (right now they're showing JV high school soccer on one of the channels), and several pay channels featuring 30 year old movies.

I've changed boxes 3 times, and I still have to reboot this Cisco based piece of crap at least once a day.
My internet speeds are crap for fully 1/2 the day despite having the the best modem available and a squeaky clean i7 with no bloatware.


Boys or girls JV high school soccer?
 
2014-06-25 03:44:33 PM  
Fubini, Netflix won't give me much info unless I sign up for a free trial. What is the range of subscriptions? What I mean is: Is there only one subscription or is it like cable where pricier subscriptions give you more content, speed or both?
 
2014-06-25 03:46:14 PM  

oh_please: mrmopar5287: Dinjiin: Besides, à la carte TV has missed its time.  It should have been available 15-20 years ago with first generation digital cable boxes.  But now with video on demand services like Netflix, Amazon Prime, Google Play, the iStore and cable PPV, why bother paying for a channel when you only watch a few shows on it?  Just pay for the shows directly.

There is something to be said about having ESPN and other sports networks for live sporting events.  I bet there are a lot of people who would love to buy the NFL Sunday Ticket thing without having to have DirecTV with all the other channels and instead just get it through Netflix.

Pretty much this...sports is the only thing keeping us from cutting the cord entirely.

However, if you have more than one major cable provider in your area, you can just switch back and forth every year or two, and get a "new customer" discount. They count on customers just staying once the promo pricing runs out, because it's a minor hassle to switch. It's really not if you have web-based email. For instance, WOW is giving us extended basic (no HD), 15Mb internet, and phone for around $150/mo. Charter offered us all that, plus HD, plus 60Mb internet, plus all 3 HBO, all 3 Showtime, and all 3 Cinemax for a little over $100/mo, cable cards for the Tivos and a free DVR for the bedroom included. Guess who's coming out tomorrow to hook up? We'll stay with them for the 2 years that they guarantee the price, then either switch back to WOW or cut the cord entirely.

Oh, and there's no contract, so we can get out at any time.


I am ready to do that soon.  I called Charter this weekend to get my $200 bill down to a more reasonable rate (all cable channels, internet and phone).  I looked up their new customer price and the same package I have is $136 a month.  AT&T's similiar package is $134 (slower internet).  The three people I talked to said that last year Charter dropped their 'renegotiate every year' policy that kept my rates pretty reasonable and now going with new and current customer rates.  Nothing else.  I asked for the rate someone who hasn't been a customer for 10 years would get and was told there was no other option.  When I explained that there were at least 2 other options (AT&T and DirectTV) the supervisor seemed confused and told me how their 'market research' developed this model.  She didn't get the sarcasm when I asked if the 'market research' included talking to customers about their $200 bill.  It turns out that if I switch just the cable to AT&T and use Charter for Internet (100mb is hard to give up) and Phone, my total monthly bill would be about the same as a new customer with either company.
 
2014-06-25 03:54:53 PM  

DORMAMU: HempHead: pueblonative: HempHead: Slam Bradley: I just bought the antenna yesterday.  I think we are both (wife and I) ready to cut the cord.  The major test will be in August when Dr. Who comes back.  I can't for the life of me find a way to stream current episodes of Dr. Who without resorting to the dark arts of the internet.

/Red Sox picked a good season to really phone it in so I am not feeling horrible about missing sports at the moment

VPN for $5/month & BBC iPlayer.

Data caps really don't care how many boxy-proxies you hide behind.

How big can an episode of Dr Who be?

BBC iPlayer even gives you the option to stream SD or HD.


Tom Baker alone as the doctor is around 30 gigs in 480p...

then you have steam summer sales which rape your bandwidth as much as your wallet

and the icing on the cake is there are isp's who say, and get quite offended when you point out their bullshi@t, "25GB/mo is more than anyone should ever need... but just in case here is 10GB more (one time transaction for the month it is purchased in) for $15.


Unfortunately, BBC iPlayer only ever keeps a few recent, past episodes.

It would be great if they had entire libraries of shows.
 
2014-06-25 04:12:53 PM  

mcmnky: TommyymmoT: I'm making arrangements to drop Time Warner completely.
$143 a month for cable, HBO, and internet, and it works whenever it feels like it.
I don't need 12 shopping channels, over 70 sports channels that I couldn't give a rat's ass about (right now they're showing JV high school soccer on one of the channels), and several pay channels featuring 30 year old movies.

I've changed boxes 3 times, and I still have to reboot this Cisco based piece of crap at least once a day.
My internet speeds are crap for fully 1/2 the day despite having the the best modem available and a squeaky clean i7 with no bloatware.

Boys or girls JV high school soccer?


Boys. I'm not going to pay to watch a bunch of two legged zits kick a ball around thinking it's important.
 
2014-06-25 04:36:01 PM  

TommyymmoT: mcmnky: TommyymmoT: I'm making arrangements to drop Time Warner completely.
$143 a month for cable, HBO, and internet, and it works whenever it feels like it.
I don't need 12 shopping channels, over 70 sports channels that I couldn't give a rat's ass about (right now they're showing JV high school soccer on one of the channels), and several pay channels featuring 30 year old movies.

I've changed boxes 3 times, and I still have to reboot this Cisco based piece of crap at least once a day.
My internet speeds are crap for fully 1/2 the day despite having the the best modem available and a squeaky clean i7 with no bloatware.

Boys or girls JV high school soccer?

Boys. I'm not going to pay to watch a bunch of two legged zits kick a ball around thinking it's important.


[this is an outrage.jpg]
 
2014-06-25 04:45:14 PM  
mcmnky:

[this is an outrage.jpg]

============

Damned right it's an outrage Sparky.
Fully half my bill goes to pay for channels that the majority of people wouldn't watch even if it were the only programming available.
 
2014-06-25 04:46:43 PM  

bluenote13: oh_please: mrmopar5287: Dinjiin: Besides, à la carte TV has missed its time.  It should have been available 15-20 years ago with first generation digital cable boxes.  But now with video on demand services like Netflix, Amazon Prime, Google Play, the iStore and cable PPV, why bother paying for a channel when you only watch a few shows on it?  Just pay for the shows directly.

There is something to be said about having ESPN and other sports networks for live sporting events.  I bet there are a lot of people who would love to buy the NFL Sunday Ticket thing without having to have DirecTV with all the other channels and instead just get it through Netflix.

Pretty much this...sports is the only thing keeping us from cutting the cord entirely.

However, if you have more than one major cable provider in your area, you can just switch back and forth every year or two, and get a "new customer" discount. They count on customers just staying once the promo pricing runs out, because it's a minor hassle to switch. It's really not if you have web-based email. For instance, WOW is giving us extended basic (no HD), 15Mb internet, and phone for around $150/mo. Charter offered us all that, plus HD, plus 60Mb internet, plus all 3 HBO, all 3 Showtime, and all 3 Cinemax for a little over $100/mo, cable cards for the Tivos and a free DVR for the bedroom included. Guess who's coming out tomorrow to hook up? We'll stay with them for the 2 years that they guarantee the price, then either switch back to WOW or cut the cord entirely.

Oh, and there's no contract, so we can get out at any time.

I am ready to do that soon.  I called Charter this weekend to get my $200 bill down to a more reasonable rate (all cable channels, internet and phone).  I looked up their new customer price and the same package I have is $136 a month.  AT&T's similiar package is $134 (slower internet).  The three people I talked to said that last year Charter dropped their 'renegotiate every year' policy that kept my ...


Seriously, DO NOT get ATT DSL, unless you have one computer and just check your email/Facebook.

Quite frankly, I think it farking sucks that cable providers couldn't give a damn about their existing customers. I told WOW what Charter was offering,  said I want to stay with them, they basically told me, "too bad for you", and the rep spent all her time trying to bash Charter and telling me how awful it would be to have to change my email address. Really, that was their argument. I told her I wanted to speak with someone in customer retention, she said she was a "customer retention specialist". I told her she didn't do her job.
 
2014-06-25 05:58:51 PM  

MBA Whore: Fubini, Netflix won't give me much info unless I sign up for a free trial. What is the range of subscriptions?


Streaming (to 2 devices simultaneously) is $7.99 per month.

DVD plans ranged from $7.99 to $19.99 per month (depending on the number of discs (1-3) and whether you get blu+ray discs)
 
2014-06-25 06:10:00 PM  

oh_please: Pretty much this...sports is the only thing keeping us from cutting the cord entirely.


Given the blackout and merchandising rules of the NFL, MLB, and NBA, I am amazed that US TV sports fans even exist any more.

From where I sit it looks like fans are in a co-dependent relationship with someone who visits only to beat money out of the fan.
 
2014-06-25 06:10:57 PM  
We have Comcast triple-play and our bill is around 200 a month. Kathryn loves to watch TV and watches a revolving diet of perhaps 50 channels. I enjoy watching HGTV, Food Channel, Destination, Travel Channel, and a few more. The TV is probably on a minimum of 10-12 hours a day since she teaches at night and is home grading papers during the day. So, until it gets a lot more expensive, I imagine we will stick with it. I have to say that my dealings with Comcast, with only a few exceptions, has been just fine. My cable TV has only really gone out once in over 10 years and that was when the Twin Cities got hit by straight-line winds in excess of 70 MPH and EVERYONE lost power and cable for the weekend across the city. Our internet service so far has had, maybe, one glitchy moment, and our phone service (yes, we still have a land line) is perfect. So, I guess I don't mind (much) paying a premium price for service that is virtually uninterrupted with no real problems, plus enough variety on the TV that it keeps Kathryn entertained. If it was just me, I might cut way back, but this is one of her real pleasures in life (she watches lots of documentaries, stuff on BBC America, and other channels that bore me to tears)...so I'm not going to deny that.
 
2014-06-25 06:13:49 PM  

Target Builder: So - we've basically worked out we're paying around $1000 a year to watch get Game of Thrones, which feels pretty steep.

I figure if I get a move on with reading the books I won't need to worry about spoilers next season and am looking at going with Internet + Netflix + Amazon Prime combined with theoccasional iTunes buy.

Has anyone done this?
What have your pros and cons been?
Any recommendations on internet speed I should go with? For practical purposes is anything over 10Mbps going to benoticeable?


Just buy game of thrones blu-Ray after it comes out. Target is usually half price and you can link it to your Ultraviolet account for streaming.

You'll want 10-15 if you stream a lot. Upload you dont care.
 
2014-06-25 06:18:42 PM  
Comcast keeps trying to get me to put my phone on their service.  I ask them "why would I put my phone on my most unreliable service provider"?  I need my phone to call Comcast when the Comcast connection is down.
 
2014-06-25 06:22:55 PM  
R       O       K      U.com


is all i have to say.  Thank you Lord of Internet and Content without F*cking Cable TV and its worthless commercials.


i've forgotten about cable TV and Satellite ever since.
 
2014-06-25 06:24:12 PM  

Raoul Eaton: Comcast keeps trying to get me to put my phone on their service.  I ask them "why would I put my phone on my most unreliable service provider"?  I need my phone to call Comcast when the Comcast connection is down.



Callcentric.com


Thank you Lord of All that is VOIP.   it finally set me free.
 
2014-06-25 06:26:46 PM  

Jiro Dreams Of McRibs: Roku



yea, that works. but remember, you'll bust your monthly ISP cap sooner, depending on if you have a cap and how much it is.

Roku delivered me from the Evil.    i sure miss all those mindless commercials too.  did i mention it's much cheaper too??
 
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