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(io9)   Survey can determine how much people lie in surveys   (io9.com) divider line 17
    More: Unlikely, lie detectors, long list  
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849 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 Jun 2014 at 10:44 PM (5 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



17 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-06-23 09:58:16 PM
11
 
2014-06-23 10:56:05 PM
It isn't that hard. Take an experimental methodology course in college fer chrissakes.
 
2014-06-24 12:00:48 AM
I get surveyed once a week and I never lie.

Just ask my wife, Morgan Fairchild. She helps me with the answers.
 
2014-06-24 12:02:03 AM
 
2014-06-24 12:14:29 AM
6.

Consider that the score may be off for people depending on their personality or individual quirks. The test presume I lied when I said I never take a long trip without inspecting my vehicle or that I don't resent being asked to return a favor. But for me as someone who has a meticulous and prepared mindset as well as a very capitalistic "equal exchange of value for value" sense of morality, both of those statements are indeed true.

And that's just me. I would imagine others will get questions "wrong" even though they did answer truthfully because the test presumes everyone will fit into the majority.

The test would have been more interesting if the taker didn't know it was about determining honesty in surveys before the fact. Know that's what the survey is about, it's much more likely one will answer truthfully than if it were claimed to be about something else, like how good of a person you are or something.
 
2014-06-24 12:17:31 AM
14.

Completely average. Figures.
 
2014-06-24 01:06:29 AM
5.
FARK YOU ALL.
 
2014-06-24 02:03:12 AM

Kuta: 5.
FARK YOU ALL.


Just out of curiosity, which ones did you correctly answer but the test thought you were lying? The test seems to assume that since the vast majority of people tend to do a certain action, that all must. Obviously that's not true. There are people who do always research candidates, or check their cars before a long trip. Just because most don't, it's not very accurate to assume that if you say you do, you're prone to lying on surveys.
 
2014-06-24 02:21:08 AM

metztli: It isn't that hard. Take an experimental methodology course in college fer chrissakes.


Seriously.

CSB:
I had a friend recently confide in me she always lied on those "personality tests" that big corporate employers often give because she thinks they're BS, and had to answer some awkward questions in her job interviews as a result. (Jobs she didn't get.) I pointed out that one of the main purposes of those tests is to weed out liars.
 
2014-06-24 03:10:22 AM
I do surveys for I-Say and I try my best to fit whatever they're looking for even if I have to lie cause I want the points to get Amazon gift cards.
 
2014-06-24 03:49:12 AM

Jensaarai: metztli: It isn't that hard. Take an experimental methodology course in college fer chrissakes.

Seriously.

CSB:
I had a friend recently confide in me she always lied on those "personality tests" that big corporate employers often give because she thinks they're BS, and had to answer some awkward questions in her job interviews as a result. (Jobs she didn't get.) I pointed out that one of the main purposes of those tests is to weed out liars.


I took one of those once when I was much younger.  Answered honestly and didn't get the job.  The interviewer seemed shocked that I said I'd stolen things.  Yep.  A Hot Wheels knockoff when I was a kid (grandma found it and took me back to the store to apologize) and Playboy/Penthouse mags when I was a teen.  Apparently that rated the same as stealing quarries and stadiums because I was never asked  what I stole.

Many years later, I'd been working for a company for years when the owner decided to try out some sort of aptitude test she'd been using on potential employees.  Business was slow and she wanted to see how some of the better employees fared on the test.  Of course, she did it wrong.  There was a math section with somewhere around 20 questions across 10 pages.  It was the longest section so far.  After two minutes she said, "Time's up!"  How could time be up?  That's 6 seconds per question, many of them quite wordy in their setup.  I read fast but I hadn't even finished skimming the questions, let alone working them.  "I never would have hired you for your job based on this.  You did great in spatial perception and logic but terrible in math.  But you work with numbers all day and you're our go-to on tough projects.  Maybe that test isn't such a good idea."  I suggested that 2 minutes probably wasn't the right amount of time for the math section but that couldn't have been right because it would mean she'd made a mistake.  Everyone she tested did horrible in math and she'd given the test correctly so the test was faulty.  I assume that was the conclusion because I never saw anyone take the test again.  Since I did good in the logic section, I'm probably right.
 
2014-06-24 06:29:43 AM
Recursion (n) See: Recursion
 
2014-06-24 07:41:28 AM
7. I'm a terrible person.
 
2014-06-24 08:45:08 AM

FatherChaos: Do you eat beans?  Would you like to see a new movie starring George Wendt?


I didn't come here specifically for this, but that was a brilliant reminder of those memories. I didn't even have to click the link...
 
2014-06-24 10:13:24 AM

jtown: Jensaarai: metztli: It isn't that hard. Take an experimental methodology course in college fer chrissakes.

Seriously.

CSB:
I had a friend recently confide in me she always lied on those "personality tests" that big corporate employers often give because she thinks they're BS, and had to answer some awkward questions in her job interviews as a result. (Jobs she didn't get.) I pointed out that one of the main purposes of those tests is to weed out liars.

I took one of those once when I was much younger.  Answered honestly and didn't get the job.  The interviewer seemed shocked that I said I'd stolen things.  Yep.  A Hot Wheels knockoff when I was a kid (grandma found it and took me back to the store to apologize) and Playboy/Penthouse mags when I was a teen.  Apparently that rated the same as stealing quarries and stadiums because I was never asked  what I stole.

Many years later, I'd been working for a company for years when the owner decided to try out some sort of aptitude test she'd been using on potential employees.  Business was slow and she wanted to see how some of the better employees fared on the test.  Of course, she did it wrong.  There was a math section with somewhere around 20 questions across 10 pages.  It was the longest section so far.  After two minutes she said, "Time's up!"  How could time be up?  That's 6 seconds per question, many of them quite wordy in their setup.  I read fast but I hadn't even finished skimming the questions, let alone working them.  "I never would have hired you for your job based on this.  You did great in spatial perception and logic but terrible in math.  But you work with numbers all day and you're our go-to on tough projects.  Maybe that test isn't such a good idea."  I suggested that 2 minutes probably wasn't the right amount of time for the math section but that couldn't have been right because it would mean she'd made a mistake.  Everyone she tested did horrible in math and she'd given the test correctly so the test was faulty.  I assume that was the conclusion because I never saw anyone take the test again.  Since I did good in the logic section, I'm probably right.


I see that attitude a lot and it is frustrating. "There must be something wrong with this because the problem certainly isn't me."

When someone points out one of my mistakes, I thank them for it.

/Ok, no, I generally feel embarrassed and annoyed, but I still fix the mistake instead of carrying on like the problem is someone else's screw up
 
2014-06-24 11:39:58 AM
What do you do if some of those are objectively true for you?  Like I take 16-20 hours once every couple years to do thorough research on every single candidate in my local elections(soil and water manager who was a regular poster at stormfront was a fun discovery).  I'm not trying to make myself look good to the survey, but just honestly responding to how I approach that particular thing.  It seems like the survey is built on the premise that there's no threshold for which you aren't lying about the item to make yourself look good.

//I do occasionally hesitate to help people, I guess
 
2014-06-24 04:17:50 PM
My local newspaper's website has a survey for almost every goddamn article you click on. I intentionally lie on every single one of them, and give absurd answers when you're able to type text.

"How many times do you exercise a week?"
Answer: "I'm a bed ridden 800lb man"

"What do you look for in a cable TV provider?"
Answer: "Will the installer be hot with big boobs?"

etc.

fark required online surveys.
 
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