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(Quartz)   Good to see these teachers aren't letting a fear of school shootings go to waste   (qz.com ) divider line 34
    More: Interesting, school shootings, Daniel Nietzel  
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2356 clicks; posted to Business » on 23 Jun 2014 at 1:18 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



34 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-06-23 12:05:26 PM  
Heh. Good idea really.
 
2014-06-23 12:20:24 PM  
The Sleeve: The Product That Is Buying You Time, When Time Is Not For Sale.

That's one hell of a motto. It sure beats the hell out of 'A Gun In Every Classroom'.
 
2014-06-23 01:21:26 PM  
That is actually a well designed product and a clever solution to that problem.
 
2014-06-23 01:29:44 PM  
That should make those folks some money.  Good on them.
 
2014-06-23 01:35:07 PM  
"There's not a teacher that goes to work every day that doesn't somewhere in the back of their mind think that could be a possibility," Nietzel tells Quartz. "When a locker slams in the doorway at a time of day that it shouldn't, you go like, was that a gun shot?"

No, actually that's an unhealthy level of paranoia.
 
2014-06-23 01:36:45 PM  
Huh. And here I assumed it was going to be something retarded. That's actually pretty brilliant.

/although if I were a teenage psychopath intent on massacring my classmates, I might start looking into explosives or chemical weapons if I knew classroom doors were now impenetrable
 
2014-06-23 01:36:54 PM  
I like the idea. But take it one step further. I'd think that with four different models and a school that might use all four, somewhere along the line the wrong sleeve will end up in the wrong room. Since the sleeve just stops those pivot arms from moving, develop some kind of hose clamp thing that would work on almost any door, regardless of the type of opening system. Heck, a heavy duty zip tie might work, as long as you developed something that wouldn't slip off. But at least it's a start, and something better will come along one day.
 
2014-06-23 01:37:33 PM  

Felgraf: That is actually a well designed product and a clever solution to that problem.


I agree.

Can we stop pushing gun control on law abiding citizens now?
 
2014-06-23 01:42:50 PM  
I look forward to seeing this on CNN in 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 days.
 
2014-06-23 01:45:06 PM  

OregonVet: Heh. Good idea really.


Market a device to teachers that lets them fiddle with school property (I'm guessing a nono in many districts) and probably violates a few fire codes as well?
 
2014-06-23 01:47:08 PM  
www.dave-cushman.net
Keep It Simple.
 
2014-06-23 01:47:56 PM  
Spend $65.00 for a metal sleeve that will most likely get misplaced over time or spend $1.99 on one of these?

www.trudoor.com

This isn't rocket science people.
 
2014-06-23 01:48:20 PM  
What about a door knob that you can pop off from the inside? It would still function from inside the room.
You could even add a battery and transponder and control them all from the office.
 
2014-06-23 01:49:06 PM  

pueblonative: OregonVet: Heh. Good idea really.

Market a device to teachers that lets them fiddle with school property (I'm guessing a nono in many districts) and probably violates a few fire codes as well?


This is a good point - although the chances of anyone actually needing to ever use this are pretty close to zero. These would just collect dust, until the students saw them sitting in the corner and the teacher steps out of the room - then the "sleeve" gets used...
 
2014-06-23 01:51:27 PM  
Just wait until some pranksters get a hold of these and lock the teacher out of the classrooms. Then they'll do marijuana and play Pokemon and listen to Justin Timberlake tapes while the teacher tries getting into the classroom. Mass hysteria I tell ya.
 
2014-06-23 01:59:07 PM  
The next question many teachers ask is how to protect their classroom, which is actually harder than it might seem...

No, it's not hard. We just won't do it.

It's a clever solution to a problem we choose to allow, though, I'll give him that.
 
2014-06-23 02:01:00 PM  

eKonk: [www.dave-cushman.net image 256x133]
Keep It Simple.


ReapTheChaos: Spend $65.00 for a metal sleeve that will most likely get misplaced over time or spend $1.99 on one of these?

[www.trudoor.com image 610x329]

This isn't rocket science people.


Neither of you has siblings, eh?

A well-placed kick from even a not-so-heavy person will rip either of those off the wall, unless you're riveting them into the steel doorframe or something. The beauty of the sleeve is that you've got to overcome incredible amounts of inertia to bend the sleeve's frame and force that door open.
 
2014-06-23 02:02:40 PM  
Why is that site so badly coded?
 
2014-06-23 02:09:25 PM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Huh. And here I assumed it was going to be something retarded. That's actually pretty brilliant.



Except for those large windows right next to the door...
 
2014-06-23 02:09:57 PM  

skozlaw: The next question many teachers ask is how to protect their classroom, which is actually harder than it might seem...

No, it's not hard. We just won't do it.

It's a clever solution to a problem we choose to allow, though, I'll give him that.


Yeah, this. If teachers feel the protection in their classrooms is insufficient, and the local, state, and federal governments will not (or cannot) improve that protection, then I'm not at all surprised that some teachers are taking steps on their own.
 
2014-06-23 02:19:27 PM  

Dr Dreidel: eKonk: [www.dave-cushman.net image 256x133]
Keep It Simple.

ReapTheChaos: Spend $65.00 for a metal sleeve that will most likely get misplaced over time or spend $1.99 on one of these?

[www.trudoor.com image 610x329]

This isn't rocket science people.

Neither of you has siblings, eh?

A well-placed kick from even a not-so-heavy person will rip either of those off the wall, unless you're riveting them into the steel doorframe or something. The beauty of the sleeve is that you've got to overcome incredible amounts of inertia to bend the sleeve's frame and force that door open.


First of all, schools and most commercial buildings have either metal or solid wood doors as compared to the hollow core doors found in most homes.

Secondly, if you had noticed the video in the article, in order for that sleeve to work the of closure needs to be mounted on the inside of the door, which mean the door opens outward. Kicking would do no good, it as it takes pulling action to open it.
 
2014-06-23 02:24:29 PM  
redlami.files.wordpress.com
 
2014-06-23 02:25:35 PM  

ReapTheChaos: First of all, schools and most commercial buildings have either metal or solid wood doors as compared to the hollow core doors found in most homes.


Good point. I had neglected that.

Secondly, if you had noticed the video in the article, in order for that sleeve to work the of closure needs to be mounted on the inside of the door, which mean the door opens outward. Kicking would do no good, it as it takes pulling action to open it.

"Forced", then. (And, if you add the weight of the non-hollow door to the forces pushing against the latch during an attempted entry, it becomes easier to shear it off the wall just by pushing/pulling on the door.)

Anyway, I've seen enough of those hook-and-eye and latch closures fail in enough of a variety of ways to know not to trust them with anything important (I don't even like trusting them in bathroom stalls). They're also not idiot-proof to install (not nothing when you're talking about thousands of them nationwide).
 
2014-06-23 02:38:52 PM  

Dr Dreidel: ReapTheChaos: First of all, schools and most commercial buildings have either metal or solid wood doors as compared to the hollow core doors found in most homes.

Good point. I had neglected that.

Secondly, if you had noticed the video in the article, in order for that sleeve to work the of closure needs to be mounted on the inside of the door, which mean the door opens outward. Kicking would do no good, it as it takes pulling action to open it.

"Forced", then. (And, if you add the weight of the non-hollow door to the forces pushing against the latch during an attempted entry, it becomes easier to shear it off the wall just by pushing/pulling on the door.)

Anyway, I've seen enough of those hook-and-eye and latch closures fail in enough of a variety of ways to know not to trust them with anything important (I don't even like trusting them in bathroom stalls). They're also not idiot-proof to install (not nothing when you're talking about thousands of them nationwide).


also, i think you may be ignoring a key reason why class room doors can't be locked inside: the students will lock the teacher out of the classroom for shiats and giggles.  that's why they don't want interior locks easily accessible to students.  it would make every day stupid.  have this device on the teacher, and you lock the door without creating a day to day problem.

however, you do create the "oh shiat, where did i put that lock thing" problem in the event of emergency.

which leads one to the only available conclusion, this product is a placebo.  It serves to give you the illusion of security, when in reality, you probably would not have the wherewithal, preparation, or clear headedness to implement the device in the event of an emergency.
 
2014-06-23 02:40:32 PM  
When a locker slams in the doorway at a time of day that it shouldn't, you go like, was that a gun shot?


What kind of pathetic idiot lives their life that way? Yeah, bad shiat happens. It happens all the time. But it doesn't happen anymore often than it used to, and the chances of it happening to you are incredibly slim. I bet these same cowardly idiots drive cars to work and eat fast food.
 
2014-06-23 02:51:03 PM  

Dr Dreidel: eKonk: [www.dave-cushman.net image 256x133]
Keep It Simple.

ReapTheChaos: Spend $65.00 for a metal sleeve that will most likely get misplaced over time or spend $1.99 on one of these?

[www.trudoor.com image 610x329]

This isn't rocket science people.

Neither of you has siblings, eh?

A well-placed kick from even a not-so-heavy person will rip either of those off the wall, unless you're riveting them into the steel doorframe or something. The beauty of the sleeve is that you've got to overcome incredible amounts of inertia to bend the sleeve's frame and force that door open.


The doors open outward, so there's no way in hell kicking it would gain you entry, and a deadbolt would be plenty to resist somebody trying to pull it open.
 
2014-06-23 02:54:33 PM  

That Guy Jeff: What kind of pathetic idiot lives their life that way? Yeah, bad shiat happens. It happens all the time. But it doesn't happen anymore often than it used to, and the chances of it happening to you are incredibly slim. I bet these same cowardly idiots drive cars to work and eat fast food.


Well, I carry a gun and I AM a coward, so there might be some truth to that. I don't "know kung-fu". I'm not a "MMA fighter, bro". I just a nerdy white guy whose never been in a fight in his life. I have no interest in ever fighting fair with someone. I much prefer my Equalizer. Old man, nerd, woman: all can be every bit as strong as 25-year-old Robert Deziel, recently dispatched piece of sh*t whose removal has made the world a better place. Deep thoughts, with "That Guy Jeff"
 
2014-06-23 03:12:02 PM  

skozlaw: That Guy Jeff: What kind of pathetic idiot lives their life that way? Yeah, bad shiat happens. It happens all the time. But it doesn't happen anymore often than it used to, and the chances of it happening to you are incredibly slim. I bet these same cowardly idiots drive cars to work and eat fast food.

Well, I carry a gun and I AM a coward, so there might be some truth to that. I don't "know kung-fu". I'm not a "MMA fighter, bro". I just a nerdy white guy whose never been in a fight in his life. I have no interest in ever fighting fair with someone. I much prefer my Equalizer. Old man, nerd, woman: all can be every bit as strong as 25-year-old Robert Deziel, recently dispatched piece of sh*t whose removal has made the world a better place. Deep thoughts, with "That Guy Jeff"


Did you have a point? Are you comparing "being prepared for things" with "jumping at every noise"?
 
2014-06-23 03:16:29 PM  

That Guy Jeff: Are you comparing "being prepared for things" with "jumping at every noise"?


Prepared? Is that how the scouts spell their famous motto? "I-a-m-a-c-o-w-a-r-d"?

Huh. I was unaware. Must be Latin.
 
2014-06-23 03:20:53 PM  

pute kisses like a man: also, i think you may be ignoring a key reason why class room doors can't be locked inside: the students will lock the teacher out of the classroom for shiats and giggles. that's why they don't want interior locks easily accessible to students. it would make every day stupid. have this device on the teacher, and you lock the door without creating a day to day problem.

however, you do create the "oh shiat, where did i put that lock thing" problem in the event of emergency.


I was just pondering this - if the sleeve is attached to the door somehow (I was thinking a length of chain, or a holster by the top of the jamb), how are students prevented from misusing it (we want them to be able to slap that thing on in the event of emergency) while also affording our shorter teachers access?

which leads one to the only available conclusion, this product is a placebo. It serves to give you the illusion of security, when in reality, you probably would not have the wherewithal, preparation, or clear headedness to implement the device in the event of an emergency.

Easier to use this absent training or steady hands than, say, a Glock 9mm (which some would prefer as a solution). It's definitely most useful as a salve for the fears of (largely) white suburbanites, but a fine step forward in "room security".

// and the first time someone defeats it, or a student locks Teach out of class for an hour, we'll learn how to beat the Sleeve-defeater
// and the defense/anti-defense tech arms race continues
 
2014-06-23 03:28:00 PM  

Cork on Fork: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Huh. And here I assumed it was going to be something retarded. That's actually pretty brilliant.


Except for those large windows right next to the door...


Windows?

My high school was a bunker, a marvel of 1970s brutalist architecture rendered as a cube of reinforced concrete and cast iron, and sunk into a hillside. The Nazis built submarine pens with less armor. There were no windows anywhere in the building, much less next to the classroom doors.

So I guess the idea of a school with windows seems hilarious to me.
 
2014-06-23 03:50:59 PM  
Another interesting thought about this. It's kind of like closing a bulkhead door on a submarine. If you're going to make it work, you have to be willing to lock out all the fleeing students in the hallway.
 
2014-06-23 07:37:24 PM  

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Cork on Fork: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Huh. And here I assumed it was going to be something retarded. That's actually pretty brilliant.


Except for those large windows right next to the door...

Windows?

My high school was a bunker, a marvel of 1970s brutalist architecture rendered as a cube of reinforced concrete and cast iron, and sunk into a hillside. The Nazis built submarine pens with less armor. There were no windows anywhere in the building, much less next to the classroom doors.

So I guess the idea of a school with windows seems hilarious to me.


My school was also a product of the 70s; it originally had an interior courtyard (that later became the cafeteria).  So even classrooms that didn't boarder outside walls had windows.

/shudder to think what would happen if there was a shooting there
 
2014-06-24 12:11:30 PM  
Sleeve, a steel piece that slides onto the door closer hinge at the top of classroom doors, and prevents the door from opening.


YMMV depending on your local building code.

There is a reason why the "Classroom Lockset" was developed by door hardware manufacturers.

"Classroom Lockset: Outside and inside lockable by key. Inside always unlocked"

What this Sleeve product does is takes an egress door (doors along a path of egress cannot be locked) and secures it shut, and does so in a manner that would be hard to release in a panic situation by an average occupant (in this case, "average occupant" in a classroom is a tiny kid who cant reach that high). You cant just assume that the teacher will always be of capacity to remove the device if needed.
 
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