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(FullFact)   How to interpret health news stories for yourself, because the media will invariably get it wrong   (fullfact.org ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Cambridge University  
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1150 clicks; posted to Geek » on 24 Jun 2014 at 12:17 AM (2 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



14 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2014-06-23 11:56:38 PM  
um - what percentage of the population is actually qualified to analyze a medical study?
 
2014-06-24 12:24:33 AM  
I just ask one of my doctors; they are all also in research. Yay UPMC!
 
2014-06-24 12:51:39 AM  
That's not bad, as rules of thumb go.  "If the media wouldn't be able to push it as exciting were the findings the other way, they're probably misrepresenting something," essentially.

Even applies to some of the other people that use bullshiat non-science studies besides sensationalist media folks, like certain political agendas.  Is their 'new evidence' that evolution is a lie being played as shocking or brave/iconoclastic?  Then it's probably bullshiat.  Not necessarily in the sense of the study itself being false, but in the person presenting it to you using it to imply or 'inform' you of something that's an outright lie.

// Well, in the case of creationism studies the study itself is a collection of falsehoods, too, generally.  But you see what I mean there.
 
2014-06-24 12:53:44 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2014-06-24 01:08:01 AM  
If it's from research doctors you can typically trust, but verify.

If it is from engineers not trained in a health field or a scientist doing research way outside his field, it's probably bullshiat and trying to sell you something.
 
2014-06-24 01:36:41 AM  
[Open to commercial showing people enjoying doing something normal people could never afford to do]

Narrator:  "Do you miss doing what you like because of [insert some obscure condition only .01% of the population may ever contract].  Maybe you should speak to your doctor about [insert drug of the week recently approved by FDA with minimal testing]."

[Pan to elderly couple in separate outdoor bathtubs holding hands.]

Narrator:  "Only [insert drug of the week recently approved by FDA with minimal testing] is approved as treatment for [insert some obscure condition only .01% of the population may ever contract].  Side effects may include, but are not limited to; irritability, tennis elbow, toenail discoloration, big nose syndrome, happy liver disease, mobius loops, fat beets, explosive diarrhea, implosive diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting.  If you experience an erection lasting longer than 4 hours, call more hoes."

[Pan to idyllic sunset with a silhouetted couple holding hands]

Narrator:  "Speak to your doctor today about [insert drug of the week recently approved by FDA with minimal testing], the only medication for [insert some obscure condition only .01% of the population may ever contract].  Because as a large pharmaceutical company, we care about our bottom line and want to sell you every illness we can; because we care.  Don't forget to ask your doctor, because there's a pill for everything, and even if you're not sick; there's a pill for that too."

[Fade out with inspiration music]


/every drug commercial evar
 
2014-06-24 01:43:22 AM  
Protip: if it's from naturalnewsnow.com, it can be completely disregarded.
 
2014-06-24 01:49:01 AM  

buckler: Protip: if it's from naturalnewsnow.com, it can be completely disregarded.


Truer words have never been spoken.
 
2014-06-24 02:04:22 AM  

Snapper Carr: [i.imgur.com image 542x606]


Thank you. I was GISing that as I clicked the comments link. Thanks for saving me the trouble. About as apt a thread as one can be for that image.
 
2014-06-24 02:13:18 AM  

namatad: um - what percentage of the population is actually qualified to analyze a medical study?


Well, bout 30% of the adult populace has a college degree. How many of those would understand what a P value is? Long story short, not many even have the vocabulary to read a medical journal, let alone analyze it.
 
2014-06-24 02:58:11 AM  
I only get my health news from Geocities sites with lots of bright colors and animated gifs.
 
2014-06-24 07:57:33 AM  

SpdrJay: I only get my health news from Geocities sites with lots of bright colors and animated gifs.


You've invented time travel? My company would like to pay you money.
 
2014-06-24 08:55:16 AM  

Weng: SpdrJay: I only get my health news from Geocities sites with lots of bright colors and animated gifs.

You've invented time travel? My company would like to pay you money.


Several companies have paid me money for my Time Machine many times and they will continue to do so ad infinitum.
 
2014-06-24 10:16:39 AM  

meat0918: If it's from research doctors you can typically trust, but verify.

If it is from engineers not trained in a health field or a scientist doing research way outside his field, it's probably bullshiat and trying to sell you something.


And if it actually contains a plug for their supplement/pop diet book/health program then you can pretty safely disregard it even if it's a researcher in the field. Scientists try get-rich quick schemes too.
 
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