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(CityLab)   Texas company to replicate Japanese transportation system with 200-mph bullet train line connecting Dallas and Houston in hassle-free 90-minute trip   (citylab.com) divider line 117
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1864 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Jun 2014 at 7:50 AM (12 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



117 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-06-20 01:23:00 AM
Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes
 
2014-06-20 01:37:37 AM

Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes


Not when you take into account getting to the airport early to get through security, time spent boarding, taxiing, waiting to take off, and then waiting to deplane at the destination.

I'm sure there will be some waiting involved on the train to, but it should be faster to get on, get going, and get off.

Cost will be a factor though I'm sure.  Since this is being privately developed you can bet it won't be cheap. If it's more expensive than a flight it may be hard to get takers.
 
2014-06-20 01:41:02 AM

Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes


If you want to get digitally raped by a fat black woman with a penlight, there's craigslist.

For everyone else, there's bullet trains.
 
2014-06-20 02:13:41 AM
Why in the name of all holy would you want to go to Houston?!
 
2014-06-20 05:30:03 AM

Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes


I can tell you don't fly much.

Posted from O'Hare.
 
2014-06-20 06:34:27 AM
But I have been assured by people who know such things that bullet trains are Un-American.
 
2014-06-20 06:39:25 AM
That's barely enough time to have sexy adventures!
1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2014-06-20 06:43:46 AM
i.telegraph.co.uk


Shinkansen are either on elevated tracks or in tunnels.  They never cross vehicle traffic.

I don't know if they're planning on elevating the tracks in Texas, but otherwise a vehicular collision with a 300 KPH train could be... bad.
 
2014-06-20 06:46:52 AM

HawgWild: Why in the name of all holy would you want to go to Houston Dallas?!


FTFY. I do love the train system in Japan, and I'm glad it will be linking together parts of TX. Too bad it waited until I moved away to do it.
 
2014-06-20 06:47:24 AM
Shinkansen is the best way to travel. Ever. It's one of the few things I actually like about Japan (besides rail thin, submissive women with perfect hair).
 
2014-06-20 06:53:43 AM
It just a matter of one incident before the TSA screens train and bus passengers, crushing those out of competitiveness.
 
2014-06-20 06:55:41 AM
Will the summer Texas heat mess up the rails, or whatever it will run on? If tunnels, then never mind.
 
2014-06-20 07:02:27 AM

HawgWild: Why in the name of all holy would you want to go to Houston?!


Trains go both ways.

/like subby.
// NTTAWWT
 
2014-06-20 07:03:00 AM

AMonkey'sUncle: Will the summer Texas heat mess up the rails, or whatever it will run on? If tunnels, then never mind.


You're right. That is an engineering problem, and everyone knows that engineers have absolutely no clue how to solve engineering problems.
 
2014-06-20 07:18:52 AM
lh5.googleusercontent.com

Make sure it's underground so they'll have a way to travel in the future.

Keep the stalagtites, too.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2014-06-20 07:27:11 AM

doglover: Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes

If you want to get digitally raped by a fat black woman with a penlight, there's craigslist.

For everyone else, there's bullet trains.


You really believe that there won't be security for the train too?
 
2014-06-20 07:30:01 AM

Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes


Is that including the 2 1/2 hours you need to be at the airport prior to departure for the TSA to do their cavity search?
 
2014-06-20 07:45:06 AM
Connecting Dallas and Houston? Wait a minute, they're connecting two places where people actually live? An actual practical use for a high-speed rail line? Are they even allowed to do that?

I thought high-speed rail was only essential infrastructure if it cost $100 billion and connected Bakersfield and Bumfark.
 
2014-06-20 07:59:23 AM

Gulper Eel: Connecting Dallas and Houston? Wait a minute, they're connecting two places where people actually live? An actual practical use for a high-speed rail line? Are they even allowed to do that?

I thought high-speed rail was only essential infrastructure if it cost $100 billion and connected Bakersfield and Bumfark.


This. I've been suspecting that the rail industry in the US is some sort of Producers level scam because other than the NE corridor, no proposed line makes sense because every congressman tries to get it to go through their podunk district
 
2014-06-20 08:00:06 AM
Since it's Texas they will strip all of the safety devices out for cost and rely on prayer to keep the trains safe.
 
2014-06-20 08:05:49 AM
What's wrong with just driving from Dallas to Houston?

hahahaha  yeah, ok, I'm trolling.
 
2014-06-20 08:23:06 AM
Unfortunately, whichever way you go, you're still in Texas.
 
2014-06-20 08:24:55 AM
Being done for profit so it has a much better chance of success!
 
2014-06-20 08:35:59 AM
Part of what makes the Shinkansen so successful is that the trains run every ten minutes or so -- it doesn't matter if you miss your train. Hard to see that frequency happening here.

And in general, the Japanese public transportation system in cities and between them makes the US look like a third world country.
 
2014-06-20 08:36:54 AM
This really sounds like more of a Shelbyville idea.
 
2014-06-20 08:37:52 AM

vpb: doglover: Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes

If you want to get digitally raped by a fat black woman with a penlight, there's craigslist.

For everyone else, there's bullet trains.

You really believe that there won't be security for the train too?


There isn't security for the train. I take Acela all the damn time. I don't get x-raped.
 
2014-06-20 08:39:01 AM

HawgWild: Why in the name of all holy would you want to go to Houston?!


Because you were in Dallas.
 
2014-06-20 08:40:17 AM

wildcardjack: It just a matter of one incident before the TSA screens train and bus passengers, crushing those out of competitiveness.


Am I the only one who foresees the airlines staging a "false flag" security incident on the train deliberately to foist the same security theater on their competition and drag them down to their level?

Too cynical?
 
2014-06-20 08:42:40 AM
This actually sounds like a great location for this.  If it is successful then maybe we can have them in other parts of the country.  Any time it's brought up here it's seen as a money pit.

www.banklawyersblog.com
/It would be a money pit unless people's attitudes towards public transit change.
//Attitudes won't change.
 
2014-06-20 08:44:29 AM
The company trying to build this is doing so on the assumption that both cities metro populations will double by 2035. I highly doubt that is going to happen.
 
2014-06-20 08:46:55 AM
I cannot wait to see the aftermath the first time one of them hits a steer.
 
2014-06-20 08:54:06 AM
It would consider federal financing, says Lawless, but it will not accept subsidies even if the line fails to turn a profit.

LOL
 
2014-06-20 09:07:29 AM

maddogdelta: AMonkey'sUncle: Will the summer Texas heat mess up the rails, or whatever it will run on? If tunnels, then never mind.

You're right. That is an engineering problem, and everyone knows that engineers have absolutely no clue how to solve engineering problems.


You're right. There are sometimes Amtrak/NJ Transit delays because overhead wires melt in the heat. Where are those engineers now?

Hint: Not driving the train because no power.
 
2014-06-20 09:09:36 AM

AMonkey'sUncle: maddogdelta: AMonkey'sUncle: Will the summer Texas heat mess up the rails, or whatever it will run on? If tunnels, then never mind.

You're right. That is an engineering problem, and everyone knows that engineers have absolutely no clue how to solve engineering problems.

You're right. There are sometimes Amtrak/NJ Transit delays because overhead wires melt in the heat. Where are those engineers now?


Probably requesting a budget to deal with overhead wires that overheat.
 
2014-06-20 09:10:26 AM
Federal government wants to build more train lines: NEVER UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES
Private company wants to build more train lines: GIVE THEM FEDERAL FUNDING
 
2014-06-20 09:13:00 AM
If this high speed rail has a stop in Austin, I will pray to whatever god they worship to make this happen.  Flying out of Austin Sucks, with most flights stopping in Houston or Dallas anyway.  Being able to take a 45 minute train ride to Dallas and flying out from there would be awesome.
 
2014-06-20 09:17:14 AM
When it's done it'll travel 85mph, cost twice as much as a plane ticket and move 5 people between the cities per trip at a crippling loss.
 
2014-06-20 09:21:50 AM

TheGogmagog: Any time it's brought up here it's seen as a money pit.


Because it's usually a government conceived/funded project that's being discussed.
 
2014-06-20 09:22:19 AM

TuteTibiImperes: Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes

Not when you take into account getting to the airport early to get through security, time spent boarding, taxiing, waiting to take off, and then waiting to deplane at the destination.

I'm sure there will be some waiting involved on the train to, but it should be faster to get on, get going, and get off.

Cost will be a factor though I'm sure.  Since this is being privately developed you can bet it won't be cheap. If it's more expensive than a flight it may be hard to get takers.


And landing 30 minutes (with no traffic) and up to an hour (with traffic) from downtown from IAH and 20 minutes/40 minutes from Hobby.
 
2014-06-20 09:37:47 AM
TheGogmagog:
Any time it's brought up here it's seen as a money pit.

For a financial comparison, let's look at the California system versus the Texas one:

California: 520 miles, connecting a very large city to one large city and a bunch of little ones.
Texas: 240 miles, connecting two very large cities

California: $100 billion or so, to be completed some time in a couple of decades. Maybe.
Texas: $10 billion, to be completed in about ten years.
 
2014-06-20 09:40:38 AM
High-speed rail already works.  It's always just been just a question of how badly people want it.

People love it once they try it out.  Even the Acela, which is all hype.
 
2014-06-20 09:42:24 AM
thornhil:
Part of what makes the Shinkansen so successful is that the trains run every ten minutes or so -- it doesn't matter if you miss your train. Hard to see that frequency happening here.

The big thing that made the Shinkansen so successful was going bankrupt.

You see, the original system, as built, was losing a crapload of money. The cost of the right-of-way was killing them and the Shinkansen was never going to make money. So they went broke, were bought out for a fraction of their incurred debt, and are now back in business only because of that massive elimination of debt.

They also have the benefit of legal protection - the airlines are specifically prohibited from competing with the Shinkansen on its most "profitable" routes.
 
2014-06-20 09:44:56 AM

Dancin_In_Anson: Being done for profit so it has a much better chance of success!


And we know how profits guarantee success!

stocklogos.com

And government sponsorship is a pre-requisite for failure
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2014-06-20 09:48:00 AM

TuteTibiImperes: Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes

Not when you take into account getting to the airport early to get through security, time spent boarding, taxiing, waiting to take off, and then waiting to deplane at the destination.

I'm sure there will be some waiting involved on the train to, but it should be faster to get on, get going, and get off.

Cost will be a factor though I'm sure.  Since this is being privately developed you can bet it won't be cheap. If it's more expensive than a flight it may be hard to get takers.


Nice thing is, it's private money. If it doesn't work out, taxpayers aren't out the dough the way we here in California will be when "high speed rail" fails spectacularly.
 
2014-06-20 09:51:45 AM

Fano: Gulper Eel: Connecting Dallas and Houston? Wait a minute, they're connecting two places where people actually live? An actual practical use for a high-speed rail line? Are they even allowed to do that?

I thought high-speed rail was only essential infrastructure if it cost $100 billion and connected Bakersfield and Bumfark.

This. I've been suspecting that the rail industry in the US is some sort of Producers level scam because other than the NE corridor, no proposed line makes sense because every congressman tries to get it to go through their podunk district


That's the beauty of building one entirely inside one state. They don't have to build unnecessary spur lines get votes from Oklahoma and New Mexico.

Inside a state urban legislators would favor direct links. The rural districts in the rail corridor get construction crews coming it to rent rooms and buy food. San Antonio and Austin don't win anything this time, but it establishes a precedent which may include them in the future.
 
2014-06-20 09:54:32 AM
TuteTibiImperes:
Cost will be a factor though I'm sure. Since this is being privately developed you can bet it won't be cheap.

Um... what?

You really meant "Since this is being privately developed you can bet it will be insanely cheaper than the ones proposed and developed by governments." Right?

The per-mile cost of this one is proposed to be between 1/4 and 1/5 the price of California's boondoggle, for example... and between two cities that have a large business commuter population already, as opposed to the California one, where the demand for a SF/LA link is lacking, to say the least.

There's a Florida medium-high speed (80 to 125 MPH) rail proposal in the works, too - a private one this time, between Orlando and Miami (there's that magical 200 to 250 mile distance again...) And, again, the price is supposed to be a fraction of the last government-sponsored HSR link between those cities. The cost for this one will be much lower than the commuter rail system (SunRail) in Orlando.
 
2014-06-20 09:54:53 AM

PC LOAD LETTER: vpb: doglover: Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes

If you want to get digitally raped by a fat black woman with a penlight, there's craigslist.

For everyone else, there's bullet trains.

You really believe that there won't be security for the train too?

There isn't security for the train. I take Acela all the damn time. I don't get x-raped.


I go to our local county fair. For the past 5 years or so, we've been subjected to the same kind of procedures that airports have: no liquids, metal detectors, no knives, long lines, blah blah. The only thing missing so far is the body x-rays, and I'm sure it's coming as soon as these power-mad idiots can buy the necessary equipment. If some effing morons can amp up this kind of security for a damned fair, do you think high speed rail is going to get left off the list for long? I don't.
 
2014-06-20 09:57:36 AM
cgraves67:
San Antonio and Austin don't win anything this time, but it establishes a precedent which may include them in the future.

The future plans for the Texas system already include a triangular-shaped route, with lines connecting San Antonio, Austin, Dallas, and Houston, with a couple of stops in between (College Station and Waco, for example).
 
2014-06-20 09:59:46 AM

maddogdelta: And we know how profits guarantee success!


No guarantee but a much better chance. But you know that. Or at least I hope you know that.
 
2014-06-20 10:00:21 AM
i'll never ride it.

i won't step one foot in Texas.
 
2014-06-20 10:03:53 AM
solokumba:
i'll never ride it.

i won't step one foot in Texas.


Those old warrants are still active, huh?
 
2014-06-20 10:06:41 AM
Been in Lubbock a month now. WTB 200 mph train to... anywhere...
 
2014-06-20 10:11:25 AM

Dancin_In_Anson: No guarantee but a much better chance. But you know that. Or at least I hope you know that


Actually, I have found that the possibility for profit only guarantees that there are people involved who only want money.  In the US Navy, we weren't particularly concerned with profit. Neither was the space program.

As soon as profit is invloved, people start getting the urge to cut many corners to maximize profit.
 
2014-06-20 10:11:35 AM

HawgWild: Why in the name of all holy would you want to go to Houston?!


you want to be gainfully employed
 
2014-06-20 10:12:10 AM
Don't worry, General Motors, Firestone, Chevron and ConocoPhillips will group together and destroy this like they did the world class light rail systems America used to have.
 
2014-06-20 10:14:09 AM

Baron Harkonnen: [i.telegraph.co.uk image 620x387]


Shinkansen are either on elevated tracks or in tunnels.  They never cross vehicle traffic.

I don't know if they're planning on elevating the tracks in Texas, but otherwise a vehicular collision with a 300 KPH train could be... bad.


You'd have to elevate it, though I wonder what the actual planned route is, since there's farmland between here and there
 
2014-06-20 10:15:36 AM

Mentat: What's wrong with just driving from Dallas to Houston?

hahahaha  yeah, ok, I'm trolling.


bucee's creates traffic jams at Madisonville
 
2014-06-20 10:16:40 AM

Learned Hand Job: Been in Lubbock a month now. WTB 200 mph train to... anywhere...



Buddy Holly, Mac Davis, Lloyd Maines, and freight trains going right through downtown.
Dude, you are in the most Texas city that ever Texased.
 
2014-06-20 10:17:14 AM

HawgWild: Why in the name of all holy would you want to go to Houston?!


Yea, it triggers my claustrophobia. But then again, so does Dallas. All of those tall buildings.

/I'll stay forever in smaller cities and BFE, thank you.
 
2014-06-20 10:18:10 AM

qorkfiend: Federal government wants to build more train lines: NEVER UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES
Private company wants to build more train lines: GIVE THEM FEDERAL FUNDING


yeehaw! /fires pistols into air
 
2014-06-20 10:23:10 AM

Learned Hand Job: Been in Lubbock a month now.


What are you doing up that way?
 
2014-06-20 10:25:34 AM

cgraves67: Fano: Gulper Eel: Connecting Dallas and Houston? Wait a minute, they're connecting two places where people actually live? An actual practical use for a high-speed rail line? Are they even allowed to do that?

I thought high-speed rail was only essential infrastructure if it cost $100 billion and connected Bakersfield and Bumfark.

This. I've been suspecting that the rail industry in the US is some sort of Producers level scam because other than the NE corridor, no proposed line makes sense because every congressman tries to get it to go through their podunk district

That's the beauty of building one entirely inside one state. They don't have to build unnecessary spur lines get votes from Oklahoma and New Mexico.

Inside a state urban legislators would favor direct links. The rural districts in the rail corridor get construction crews coming it to rent rooms and buy food. San Antonio and Austin don't win anything this time, but it establishes a precedent which may include them in the future.


You could make it a triangle with a Hou-DFW then DFW - SA (through Austin) then SA to Hou (Through Bryan/College Station)
 
2014-06-20 10:27:06 AM

cirby: solokumba:
i'll never ride it.

i won't step one foot in Texas.

Those old warrants are still active, huh?


That or all his exes live in texas


that's why he doesn't live in tennesee
 
2014-06-20 10:28:10 AM
maddogdelta:
As soon as profit is invloved, people start getting the urge to cut many corners to maximize profit.

...and when corporate profit is not involved, people start getting the urge to spend like crazy, with few real controls over the end price, because it can either increase their own personal power (and their personal profit) or set them up for bribes (again, personal profit).

Profit is always a part of the equation - it's just that government-level profits (paid to bureaucrats and such) have a much larger disconnect between reality and the final cost. We're not even talking about bribes, specifically - a bureaucrat in charge of a government program has a strong personal interest to keep that program going - with higher costs and more government employees as underlings. And government employees never seem to get fired for going grossly over budget, or doing a bad job.
 
2014-06-20 10:29:59 AM
qorkfiend:
Federal government wants to build more train lines: NEVER UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES
Private company wants to build more train lines: GIVE THEM FEDERAL FUNDING


Private company doesn't want Federal funding: PRETEND THEY DON'T EXIST, THAT'S CRAZY TALK. GOVERNMENT IS MANDATORY.
 
2014-06-20 10:31:09 AM

HawgWild: Why in the name of all holy would you want to go to Houston?!


To get the fark out of southern oklahoma, a.k.a. Dallas?

This is a dumb idea anyway, its farking Dallas and Houston - once you are there, you need a car anyway.
 
2014-06-20 10:31:11 AM

maddogdelta: Dancin_In_Anson: No guarantee but a much better chance. But you know that. Or at least I hope you know that

Actually, I have found that the possibility for profit only guarantees that there are people involved who only want money.  In the US Navy, we weren't particularly concerned with profit. Neither was the space program.

As soon as profit is invloved, people start getting the urge to cut many corners to maximize profit.


odd, that happens pretty damn frequently in government contracts as well
 
2014-06-20 10:32:33 AM

Dancin_In_Anson: Learned Hand Job: Been in Lubbock a month now.

What are you doing up that way?


New job.
 
2014-06-20 10:36:29 AM

The Beatings Will Continue Until Morale Improves: Since it's Texas they will strip all of the safety devices out for cost and rely on prayer to keep the trains safe.


Eh, bad schools aside, Texas leads among utility stuff, and certain breeds of technology (oil and gas). Between center point, Oncor, and the other guys, texas has one of the biggest smart meter coverages in the world, or at least was one of the earliest. A lot of places imitate Oncor.
 
2014-06-20 10:45:20 AM

lilplatinum: HawgWild: Why in the name of all holy would you want to go to Houston?!

To get the fark out of southern oklahoma, a.k.a. Dallas?

This is a dumb idea anyway, its farking Dallas and Houston - once you are there, you need a car anyway.


By the time this is done, Houston's lightrail will cover most of downtown with branches connecting several other neighborhoods, airports, stadiums, etc.

Also, Houston is growing inner city, so by the time this is complete it will be much more dense as well.
 
2014-06-20 10:46:49 AM

Learned Hand Job: Been in Lubbock a month now. WTB 200 mph train to... anywhere...


Like Clovis?
 
2014-06-20 10:50:30 AM

plcow: TuteTibiImperes: Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes

Not when you take into account getting to the airport early to get through security, time spent boarding, taxiing, waiting to take off, and then waiting to deplane at the destination.

I'm sure there will be some waiting involved on the train to, but it should be faster to get on, get going, and get off.

Cost will be a factor though I'm sure.  Since this is being privately developed you can bet it won't be cheap. If it's more expensive than a flight it may be hard to get takers.

And landing 30 minutes (with no traffic) and up to an hour (with traffic) from downtown from IAH and 20 minutes/40 minutes from Hobby.


Or 90 min from DFW because 635 is a giant hole in the ground
 
2014-06-20 11:03:57 AM

Gulper Eel: Connecting Dallas and Houston? Wait a minute, they're connecting two places where people actually live? An actual practical use for a high-speed rail line? Are they even allowed to do that?

I thought high-speed rail was only essential infrastructure if it cost $100 billion and connected Bakersfield and Bumfark.


There's actually a certain logic to that.  Basically, that section will eventually be part of the San Francisco to Los Angeles route.  However, the parts nearer the big cities are harder to build on, and more importantly, full of people suing to stop the project, while the area in "bumfark" is flat and has all the locals support the thing.  So, the theory is, start there, and then build the other pieces when the lawsuits are settled ten years from now.
 
2014-06-20 11:06:00 AM

cirby: TuteTibiImperes:
Cost will be a factor though I'm sure. Since this is being privately developed you can bet it won't be cheap.

Um... what?

You really meant "Since this is being privately developed you can bet it will be insanely cheaper than the ones proposed and developed by governments." Right?

The per-mile cost of this one is proposed to be between 1/4 and 1/5 the price of California's boondoggle, for example... and between two cities that have a large business commuter population already, as opposed to the California one, where the demand for a SF/LA link is lacking, to say the least.

There's a Florida medium-high speed (80 to 125 MPH) rail proposal in the works, too - a private one this time, between Orlando and Miami (there's that magical 200 to 250 mile distance again...) And, again, the price is supposed to be a fraction of the last government-sponsored HSR link between those cities. The cost for this one will be much lower than the commuter rail system (SunRail) in Orlando.


The price for the California rail system was supposed to be $10 billion too, instead of the current $68 billion or whatever.  That is, there's no way that the cost of this stays anywhere near as low as they are now saying it will be.
 
2014-06-20 11:08:25 AM

plcow: By the time this is done, Houston's lightrail will cover most of downtown with branches connecting several other neighborhoods, airports, stadiums, etc


as someone from houston allow me to laugh at your naiveté


metro sucks, those trains while nice are running at street level, they may as well have put in bus lines, nor will they ever be extended past the inner loop


metro can't think past it's historic routes and rarely adds new ones while the city itself grows


hell they barely have bus service on weekends
 
2014-06-20 11:11:10 AM

cirby: thornhil:
Part of what makes the Shinkansen so successful is that the trains run every ten minutes or so -- it doesn't matter if you miss your train. Hard to see that frequency happening here.

The big thing that made the Shinkansen so successful was going bankrupt.

You see, the original system, as built, was losing a crapload of money. The cost of the right-of-way was killing them and the Shinkansen was never going to make money. So they went broke, were bought out for a fraction of their incurred debt, and are now back in business only because of that massive elimination of debt.

They also have the benefit of legal protection - the airlines are specifically prohibited from competing with the Shinkansen on its most "profitable" routes.


How exactly are they barred from competing -- they cannot run flight routes between certain cities? Or they cannot advertise as having routes?
 
2014-06-20 11:16:57 AM

Learned Hand Job: New job.


Drop me a note eh? I get up there now and then and might be able to point out a few things that will make living there a little more bearable. EIP

(The Jack White show last month was hopefully that start of better things to come for LBB and it was a damn good show)
 
2014-06-20 11:17:15 AM
WIll it travel through the fertilizer plant? Kinda like Disney Monorail travels through the contemporary?
 
2014-06-20 11:21:47 AM
There are three reasons why this won't happen.

1) The will be a private enterprise..that will receive it's funding from taxpayers.
2) Texans hate public transportation and anything that doesn't burn more oil. Citation:
http://www.teslamotors.com/advocacy_texas Tesla not able to sell to the public in texas.
3) I can't remember the third thing.
 
2014-06-20 11:23:45 AM

Geotpf: cirby: TuteTibiImperes:
Cost will be a factor though I'm sure. Since this is being privately developed you can bet it won't be cheap.

Um... what?

You really meant "Since this is being privately developed you can bet it will be insanely cheaper than the ones proposed and developed by governments." Right?

The per-mile cost of this one is proposed to be between 1/4 and 1/5 the price of California's boondoggle, for example... and between two cities that have a large business commuter population already, as opposed to the California one, where the demand for a SF/LA link is lacking, to say the least.

There's a Florida medium-high speed (80 to 125 MPH) rail proposal in the works, too - a private one this time, between Orlando and Miami (there's that magical 200 to 250 mile distance again...) And, again, the price is supposed to be a fraction of the last government-sponsored HSR link between those cities. The cost for this one will be much lower than the commuter rail system (SunRail) in Orlando.

The price for the California rail system was supposed to be $10 billion too, instead of the current $68 billion or whatever.  That is, there's no way that the cost of this stays anywhere near as low as they are now saying it will be.


It's almost as if Texas is pretty flat and doesn't have to build for earthquakes and California is mountainous and has to build earthquake age tracks.
 
2014-06-20 11:35:30 AM

cirby: qorkfiend:
Federal government wants to build more train lines: NEVER UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES
Private company wants to build more train lines: GIVE THEM FEDERAL FUNDING

Private company doesn't want Federal funding: PRETEND THEY DON'T EXIST, THAT'S CRAZY TALK. GOVERNMENT IS MANDATORY.


Can you name a single large corporation that doesn't request govt funding in the form of contracts, grants, or tax breaks?
 
2014-06-20 11:39:28 AM

cirby: TuteTibiImperes:
Cost will be a factor though I'm sure. Since this is being privately developed you can bet it won't be cheap.

Um... what?

You really meant "Since this is being privately developed you can bet it will be insanely cheaper than the ones proposed and developed by governments." Right?

The per-mile cost of this one is proposed to be between 1/4 and 1/5 the price of California's boondoggle, for example... and between two cities that have a large business commuter population already, as opposed to the California one, where the demand for a SF/LA link is lacking, to say the least.

There's a Florida medium-high speed (80 to 125 MPH) rail proposal in the works, too - a private one this time, between Orlando and Miami (there's that magical 200 to 250 mile distance again...) And, again, the price is supposed to be a fraction of the last government-sponsored HSR link between those cities. The cost for this one will be much lower than the commuter rail system (SunRail) in Orlando.


They may be able to build it for less by bypassing potentially unprofitable stops/routes and paying less to those who build/run it, but they still have to turn a profit on operating it.

A government backed rail project doesn't have to earn a profit.  It can consistently run in the red and continue to exist because it provides a valuable service to the community.

Using FL's example, Orlando to Miami is nice for those who make that trip a lot, but a high speed rail system that connected more cities such as Tallahassee, Jacksonville, Tampa, Fort Myers, Naples, Daytona, etc, would be better as it would benefit more people, even if it couldn't run at a profit and had to be subsidized through tax revenue.
 
2014-06-20 11:43:40 AM
geoptf:
The price for the California rail system was supposed to be $10 billion too, instead of the current $68 billion or whatever. That is, there's no way that the cost of this stays anywhere near as low as they are now saying it will be.

The initial cost of the California system was $38 billion, but that didn't last long. The initial allocation of money was only $10 billion.

And, once again - public versus private funding. The private HSR lines might have cost overruns, but nowhere near what everyone gets from public sources.
 
2014-06-20 11:44:13 AM
And it will be derailed by wild hogs.
 
2014-06-20 11:50:30 AM

plcow: By the time this is done, Houston's lightrail will cover most of downtown with branches connecting several other neighborhoods, airports, stadiums, etc.

Also, Houston is growing inner city, so by the time this is complete it will be much more dense as well.


Thats a bit ambitious a timeline, the current schedule is by 2030 the light rail will be expanded to go from "useless unless you live downtown and want to get to a Texans game without having to drive drunk" to "only moderately useless."   Not to mention that, as a city built in a farking disgusting swamp, no one wants to be outside for 2 seconds longer than normal - not really conducive to not having a vehicle.

The market is not there for someone to deal with the issue of not having a car in order to shave a couple hours off your commute, especially in state where so many people view driving as something enjoyable rather than the horrible pain in the ass it is.
 
2014-06-20 11:51:49 AM

thornhill: Part of what makes the Shinkansen so successful is that the trains run every ten minutes or so -- it doesn't matter if you miss your train. Hard to see that frequency happening here.

And in general, the Japanese public transportation system in cities and between them makes the US look like a third world country.


6 years ago we were in Europe for vacation. Almost every country we were in (Baltics) made the US look like a third world country. But that's not the beauty part. The beauty part was Rostok, Germany. Not even 20 years removed from the stagnation and repression of Communism. It isn't a big city. More like a big town. And it had light rail for getting around that was cheap and easy to use. And it was being used, And it's public places were clean, pleasant, and had the relaxed air of prosperity. American public places -- even in our wealthiest cities like NYC, LA, Seattle, and San Francisco -- seem to be Potemkin masks covering up menace and fear.
 
2014-06-20 11:54:56 AM

cirby: geoptf:
The price for the California rail system was supposed to be $10 billion too, instead of the current $68 billion or whatever. That is, there's no way that the cost of this stays anywhere near as low as they are now saying it will be.

The initial cost of the California system was $38 billion, but that didn't last long. The initial allocation of money was only $10 billion.

And, once again - public versus private funding. The private HSR lines might have cost overruns, but nowhere near what everyone gets from public sources.


How much of the difference is due to the scope of the project?

No one will even try to build a for-profit line unless there's a solid business case there.  In private enterprise the first question is always 'Can we make money doing this?' while in a publicly funded project the first question is 'Can we make people's lives better by doing this?'.
 
2014-06-20 11:59:01 AM

SpdrJay: This really sounds like more of a Shelbyville idea.


Hey, it put Ogdenville, Brockway, and North Haverbrook on the map.
 
2014-06-20 12:13:23 PM

loonatic112358: plcow: By the time this is done, Houston's lightrail will cover most of downtown with branches connecting several other neighborhoods, airports, stadiums, etc

as someone from houston allow me to laugh at your naiveté


metro sucks, those trains while nice are running at street level, they may as well have put in bus lines, nor will they ever be extended past the inner loop


metro can't think past it's historic routes and rarely adds new ones while the city itself grows


hell they barely have bus service on weekends


???

By the end of the year it will extend north past the inner loop.  It already connects every major stadium to downtown.  The next expansion will connect IAH.  And the red line is one of the highest ridership rails in the country.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_light_rail_system s_ by_ridership (look at boardings per mile to see a normalized number.)

Care to comment about naivete again?
 
2014-06-20 12:13:45 PM
TuteTibiImperes:
A government backed rail project doesn't have to earn a profit. It can consistently run in the red and continue to exist because it provides a valuable service to the community.

Using FL's example, Orlando to Miami is nice for those who make that trip a lot, but a high speed rail system that connected more cities such as Tallahassee, Jacksonville, Tampa, Fort Myers, Naples, Daytona, etc, would be better as it would benefit more people, even if it couldn't run at a profit and had to be subsidized through tax revenue.


Except that's why we're spending increasingly large amounts of money on things that almost nobody actually wants or needs.

An Orlando to Miami - or a Dallas to Houston - HSR line can be a good idea if it supplies a service that makes sense. The "we can always subsidize it" idea comes from that stupid "the taxpayers will always have more money we can take" mindset.

No, we CAN'T "always subsidize it."

A link between two places that already have a large amount of traffic between them can be a good idea. That's why the SFW/Houston and Orlando-Miami links could make sense. They're far enough apart to make a car trip annoying, but too close for airlines to work comfortably, either.

The problem with the California system is that they took two big cities without a lot of traffic between them - LA and SF - and decided that it would be nice and cool to have a train between them. Unfortunately, they did what you did. They ignored the actual costs versus actual demand. They decided to build a system, undercut the price estimates (by a factor of two or three), overstated the demand (by a factor of at least ten), and still came up with a system that will lose money.

Sure, some people will benefit. Some will get jobs, others will be able to travel the length of the state without having to deal with their fear of flying, and the like. However, that $100 billion could sure have been spent on something more useful, like bailing out the state's broken pension system...
 
2014-06-20 12:20:45 PM
TuteTibiImperes:
How much of the difference is due to the scope of the project?

Look at my numbers again:

California: 520 miles, connecting a very large city to one large city and a bunch of little ones.
Texas: 240 miles, connecting two very large cities

California: $100 billion or so, to be completed some time in a couple of decades. Maybe.
Texas: $10 billion, to be completed in about ten years.

On a cost-per-mile basis, the California HSR system is somewhere between four and five times more expensive PER MILE. No, it's not earthquake-proofing that causes that. The trains are pretty much identical, so it's not the tech. A certain amount might be land prices, but the cost of a piece of farmland is about the same in both areas.

No one will even try to build a for-profit line unless there's a solid business case there. In private enterprise the first question is always 'Can we make money doing this?' while in a publicly funded project the first question is 'Can we make people's lives better by doing this?'.

No - the first question for a publicly funded project is usually "what political benefits do the politicians get out of this?" If your question was the primary source, they'd never build it - more people's lives will be measurably worse because of the project than the handful who will measurably benefit.
 
2014-06-20 12:26:51 PM

yakmans_dad: thornhill: Part of what makes the Shinkansen so successful is that the trains run every ten minutes or so -- it doesn't matter if you miss your train. Hard to see that frequency happening here.

And in general, the Japanese public transportation system in cities and between them makes the US look like a third world country.

6 years ago we were in Europe for vacation. Almost every country we were in (Baltics) made the US look like a third world country. But that's not the beauty part. The beauty part was Rostok, Germany. Not even 20 years removed from the stagnation and repression of Communism. It isn't a big city. More like a big town. And it had light rail for getting around that was cheap and easy to use. And it was being used, And it's public places were clean, pleasant, and had the relaxed air of prosperity. American public places -- even in our wealthiest cities like NYC, LA, Seattle, and San Francisco -- seem to be Potemkin masks covering up menace and fear.


New York City has the only public transportation system in America that can compete with what you'll find in just about any other Western city (and what's really amazing is how good public transit systems are in relatively small cities in other countries). And I'm not talking about just the subway, but the whole integrated system of subway, bus, elevated train, and trains operated by other agencies, and the low cost of the MTA system.

And as good as the MTA is, they are still way behind other cities. For example, the countdown clocks in the subway are still relatively new, and they're only on the IRT lines (it could be many years until the BMT lines get them).
 
2014-06-20 12:30:26 PM

cirby: California: $100 billion or so, to be completed some time in a couple of decades. Maybe.Texas: $10 billion, to be completed in about ten years.


Comparing the actual amount spent in California to the proposal in Texas? Does that seem like an honest comparison to you?
 
2014-06-20 12:47:29 PM
img.fark.net
 
2014-06-20 12:53:06 PM

AMonkey'sUncle: Will the summer Texas heat mess up the rails, or whatever it will run on? If tunnels, then never mind.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Track_%28rail_transport%29#Continuous_w el ded_rail
"Most modern railways use continuous welded rail (CWR), sometimes referred to as ribbon rails [...] Welded rails are more expensive to lay than jointed tracks, but have much lower maintenance costs. The first welded track was used in Germany in 1924 and the US in 1930[10] and has become common on main lines since the 1950s.

If not restrained, rails would lengthen in hot weather and shrink in cold weather. To provide this restraint, the rail is prevented from moving in relation to the sleeper by use of clips or anchors. Anchors are more common for wooden sleepers, whereas most concrete or steel sleepers are fastened to the rail by special clips which resist longitudinal movement of the rail. There is no theoretical limit to how long a welded rail can be. However, if longitudinal and lateral restraint are insufficient, the track could become distorted in hot weather and cause a derailment. Distortion due to heat expansion is known in North America as sun kink, and elsewhere as buckling. In North America a rail broken due to cold-related contraction is known as a pull-apart. Attention needs to be paid to compacting the ballast effectively, including under, between, and at the ends of the sleepers, to prevent the sleepers from moving. In extreme hot weather special inspections are required to monitor sections of track known to be problematic.

After new segments of rail are laid, or defective rails replaced (welded-in), the rails can be artificially stressed if the temperature of the rail during laying is different from what is desired. The stressing process involves either heating the rails causing them to expand,[11] or stretching the rails with hydraulic equipment. They are then fastened (clipped) to the sleepers in their expanded form. This process ensures that the rail will not expand much further in subsequent hot weather. In cold weather the rails try to contract, but because they are firmly fastened, cannot do so. In effect, stressed rails are a bit like a piece of stretched elastic firmly fastened down.

CWR rail is laid (including fastening) at a temperature roughly midway between the extremes experienced at that location (this is known as the "rail neutral temperature"). This installation procedure, along with normal track structure strength, is intended to prevent tracks from buckling in summer heat or pulling apart in winter cold. In North America, because broken rails are typically detected by the signaling system; they are seen as less of a problem than heat kinks which are not detected."
 
2014-06-20 01:05:14 PM

cirby: TuteTibiImperes:
How much of the difference is due to the scope of the project?

Look at my numbers again:

California: 520 miles, connecting a very large city to one large city and a bunch of little ones.
Texas: 240 miles, connecting two very large cities

California: $100 billion or so, to be completed some time in a couple of decades. Maybe.
Texas: $10 billion, to be completed in about ten years.

On a cost-per-mile basis, the California HSR system is somewhere between four and five times more expensive PER MILE. No, it's not earthquake-proofing that causes that. The trains are pretty much identical, so it's not the tech. A certain amount might be land prices, but the cost of a piece of farmland is about the same in both areas.

No one will even try to build a for-profit line unless there's a solid business case there. In private enterprise the first question is always 'Can we make money doing this?' while in a publicly funded project the first question is 'Can we make people's lives better by doing this?'.

No - the first question for a publicly funded project is usually "what political benefits do the politicians get out of this?" If your question was the primary source, they'd never build it - more people's lives will be measurably worse because of the project than the handful who will measurably benefit.


I think you're more than a bit jaded, many politicians do want to serve the community they represent and aren't in it purely for personal gain.

You're also underestimating the number of people such a system could be useful for. I had the opportunity to spend an extended period of time in London, and in addition to the Underground (which is awesome) the entire country has a great light rail system that makes it easy to get from city to city affordably, easily, and quickly.

There's no reason why we couldn't have similar systems here in the US. People would use it, and it would be good for the economy by encouraging more travel and tourism spending.
 
2014-06-20 01:14:32 PM

maddogdelta: Dancin_In_Anson: Being done for profit so it has a much better chance of success!

And we know how profits guarantee success!

[stocklogos.com image 750x400]

And government sponsorship is a pre-requisite for failure
[upload.wikimedia.org image 734x600]


LOL. Noice.

Orbital Bootstraps, away!
 
2014-06-20 01:37:11 PM

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: I cannot wait to see the aftermath the first time one of them hits a steer.


Um - happens all the time in Europe. Exploded steer/cow etc.

The train is 1,000 tonnes and built for the impact.
 
2014-06-20 01:45:17 PM
they'll need more powerful engines to move all that Texas fat.
 
2014-06-20 01:58:03 PM

plcow: By the end of the year it will extend north past the inner loop.  It already connects every major stadium to downtown.  The next expansion will connect IAH.  And the red line is one of the highest ridership rails in the country.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_light_rail_ system s_ by_ridership (look at boardings per mile to see a normalized number.)Care to comment about naivete again?



oh yes, because a mile or so outside of 610 on one line is woooo
the redline gets high ridership because it's running from downtown to the dome, so it connects all the park and ride routes by metro to the medcenter and the dome, which would explain the highridership

The Richmond/university line is on hold because of an asshole


The Uptown line is going to be a bus lane, no really not rail, it's a bus in a dedicated lane


Which brings me back to those trains while nice are running at street level, they may as well have put in bus lines,

While I haven't had a chance to ride rail in many other cities, I can tell you from riding the redline that running at street level was a shiatty idea, and that from riding the DART line once that the green line to Royal Lane was done well. Downtown was at street level, then it went under or above. At the stop I went to the buses stopped below the train stop making it a hub.


I still stand by my comment towards you, because I wasn't complaining just about the trains, the entire metro layout is bad, and does not connect the city and surrounding areas as it should. You from here, I am, and I'd love to take the bus to work. when I did I rode downtown from the burbs, then rode a meandering path through the heights to catch a bus running along crosstimbers/34th, 2 hours minimum. I should have been able to hop a bus from the burbs, get off at 610, then catch a local route by the office. There is no 610 circular, there is no b8 circular, and there are no local buses along the major freeways all of the park and rides are setup to get you downtown and that's where metro fails.
 
2014-06-20 02:06:09 PM

cirby: No - the first question for a publicly funded project is usually "what political benefits do the politicians get out of this?"


But Navy! NASA!

SovietCanuckistan: LOL. Noice.

Orbital Bootstraps, away!


See what I mean?
 
2014-06-20 02:28:06 PM

StopLurkListen: AMonkey'sUncle: Will the summer Texas heat mess up the rails, or whatever it will run on? If tunnels, then never mind.

...Useful info...


Thanks.
 
2014-06-20 02:49:16 PM

Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes


Will you have to take off your shoes and submit to a genital grope before getting on the train?

/I suspect so.
 
2014-06-20 02:55:24 PM

flondrix: Trance750: Ore you can just hop on Southwest Airlines and beat the train by 45 minutes

Will you have to take off your shoes and submit to a genital grope before getting on the train?

/I suspect so.


One of the original selling points for California's high-speed rail project was that one could travel quickly between San Francisco and Los Angeles without being subjected to a Freedom Grope(tm) or any of the other time-consuming hassles of getting through an airport, thereby making the trip at least as fast as flying.

/should have ignored the Atherton NIMBY's and built the first stretch along the San Francisco peninsula
 
2014-06-20 04:14:08 PM
Quick math. I live 26mi away from IAH. Most Houstonians probably live further than this but I am inside the loop 610. It takes me on average 60-90 mins in rush-hour to get to IAH with parking considered. On the conservative side, I would estimate checking in for the train + departure would take 30 mins. I would also wager than once I arrived at my destination, I would have a 30 minute departure time and the time it takes to get a cab/rent a car. If the train ride takes 90 minutes, there is a 30 minute check-in/departure, 90 minute travel, and 30 minute arrival - that's 4 hours. It takes me about 4 hours as it is to drive to Dallas, and once I arrive I am at my ACTUAL destination with mobility. So, really outside of being a luxury of not having to do the grueling drive, it doesn't save me any or much time. Even on the BEST case it only took me 30 minutes to get to the station, 15 through check-in, 90 min travel, and 30 min to final destination/departure, that is almost 3 hours only saving me an hour in the car.

I would assume that it would actually be even worse going to Austin or San Antonio since both of those commutes by car are far less. I would still have the same amount of time tied up going to the station etc.

As posters above have mentioned, mass-transit is never approached correctly here and absolutely sucks. Any sort of rail system put in or bus system by-and-large goes unused and adds a shiat ton to folks commutes - or do not have the available routes. They need to fix all of that shiat, before they start looking at putting in rail.
 
2014-06-20 04:37:37 PM
TuteTibiImperes:
I think you're more than a bit jaded, many politicians do want to serve the community they represent and aren't in it purely for personal gain.

Great. Name five at the national level who support Federally-funded high speed rail. Heck, name two, and I'll give you Jerry Brown as a freebie.

You're also underestimating the number of people such a system could be useful for. I had the opportunity to spend an extended period of time in London, and in addition to the Underground (which is awesome) the entire country has a great light rail system that makes it easy to get from city to city affordably, easily, and quickly.

So now you're talking light rail instead of high speed rail? I guess you gave up on that aspect, since you changed the subject. You might note, however, that I live in a city that just started up a multi-billion-dollar light rail system - that carries a total of about 4000 passengers a day. During limited hours. And not on weekends. They're praying for a huge increase in the price of oil to try and get more riders.

Whenever people start talking about rail travel, they always bring up Europe and Japan. What they never seem to realize is that those places rely on much, much higher population densities and lower car ownership levels than the US. They also had existing passenger train rights-of-way to install those HSR and light rail systems.

The part that gets ugly is when you get much past 350 miles. At that distance, airplanes start to gain in popularity due to shorter travel times (yes, even including security), and the cost per passenger-mile starts improving. Most people don't realize it, but modern airliners are pretty energy-efficient, and they allow for much more flexible scheduling and routing.

There's no reason why we couldn't have similar systems here in the US. People would use it, and it would be good for the economy by encouraging more travel and tourism spending.

There is one HUGE reason. We don't have that many places where HSR makes sense. There's the big metropolitan area along the East Coast (BosNyWash), there are a few others (Dallas/Houston, Orlando/Miami), and a helluva lot of places where there just isn't a demand worth spending multiple billions of dollars to allow someone to travel by train instead of by air or car or bus. The US is just too spread out. Light rail? Every city I go to with a light rail system is very proud of their (usually empty and always money-losing) system.

Everywhere you find a "successful" passenger rail system, it's in one sort of place: connecting large, multi-million-population cities. And usually losing money.
 
2014-06-20 04:46:51 PM
the money is in the banana stand:
Even on the BEST case it only took me 30 minutes to get to the station, 15 through check-in, 90 min travel, and 30 min to final destination/departure, that is almost 3 hours only saving me an hour in the car.

That's similar to the reason the Orlando/Tampa HSR system got canceled. By the time you got to the station, rode the train to the other end, and found your way to your actual destination, it was going to take more time than driving - and cost much more, even for a single person in a car. The HSR folks tried to justify the route - by pretending that about ten to twenty times as many people would travel from Orlando to Tampa each day than currently do. For what? The same in California - they believe that the same sort of increase in travel from LA to SF will happen - when neither city has the lodging or transit systems to support that increase.

Once you considered multiple riders, It was literally adding up to "cheaper for the state to pay to rent everyone a car than to build the train."
 
2014-06-20 04:47:23 PM

the money is in the banana stand: Any sort of rail system put in or bus system by-and-large goes unused and adds a shiat ton to folks commutes - or do not have the available routes


IMO Houston blew a great opportunity on the Katy corridor.
 
2014-06-20 05:06:35 PM

cirby: The problem with the California system is that they took two big cities without a lot of traffic between them - LA and SF


Clearly you have never lived in California because that is bullshiat. You can argue all you want about private vs public transportation projects, but LA to San Francisco is the second busiest air route in the US (6,306,638 boardings in 2009) and in the top ten worldwide.

We're talking about a route between the primary cities of a state that, if it were a country, would have one of the largest economies in the world. It is extremely well traveled and there are dozens of flights a day between the bay area and greater LA, not to mention all the people who drive between the two cities.
 
2014-06-20 05:17:57 PM

Dancin_In_Anson: the money is in the banana stand: Any sort of rail system put in or bus system by-and-large goes unused and adds a shiat ton to folks commutes - or do not have the available routes

IMO Houston blew a great opportunity on the Katy corridor.


I don't know if it was the city, metro or txdot that foo'd that pooch
 
2014-06-20 05:43:55 PM
Mitt Romneys Tax Return:
Clearly you have never lived in California because that is bullshiat. You can argue all you want about private vs public transportation projects, but LA to San Francisco is the second busiest air route in the US (6,306,638 boardings in 2009) and in the top ten worldwide.

...except that route is a "through route" for most passengers That means they're boarding connecting flights from LAX to SFO, often for international flights. Your own cite (the 2009 data) is "outbound plus inbound, including connecting passengers." Not that many people actually fly just from LAX to SFO or the reverse. The number's been dropping, too - from 1999 to 2009, that route shrank 10%...

For direct, LAX/SFO-only travel, you're looking at a fraction of that number. Instead of 6.3 million passengers, you're looking at about 1.6 million at most. Probably a lot less.

Actual numbers? Just under 4400 actual LAX-SFO air travelers a day (at most), many of which are discount tickets or connecting to other places.

The California HSR ridership estimates rely on about 50,000 passengers a day to break even, for a trip that won't be cheaper, and will take two to four times as long. That means another 45,000 or so extra people PER DAY are going to decide to travel from one of those cities to the other for reasons that don't exist right now. That's not going to happen.
 
2014-06-20 07:01:17 PM
static.tvtropes.org
Why take the train when you can drive?
 
2014-06-20 07:22:04 PM
I've seen this movie before. We were supposed to get the Train of Grand Vitesse back in the '90s.
The only way to get it done is to give Southwest the concession to run it. Otherwise, it's D-O-A.
 
2014-06-20 07:51:32 PM

loonatic112358: Mentat: What's wrong with just driving from Dallas to Houston?

hahahaha  yeah, ok, I'm trolling.

bucee's creates traffic jams at Madisonville


God in Heaven isn't that just the tackiest damn place ever?! I would give up the adrenaline rush of blowing down Highway 21 at 80mph for a train if it meant avoiding Bucees.
 
2014-06-21 03:06:38 PM

ShutYerBeak: God in Heaven isn't that just the tackiest damn place ever?! I would give up the adrenaline rush of blowing down Highway 21 at 80mph for a train if it meant avoiding Bucees.


It's the best little crap house in texas and the coffee ain't bad, but I avoid it like the plague when it's tourist season
 
2014-06-21 05:23:20 PM
If anyone else has NHK World channel on their cable or satellite systems, or has been to Japan in the past 20 years, they will see how well developed their rail systems are. Inter and intra-city rail, subways and high speed rail, trolleys and single car trains that run the length of the country, as well as ferries everywhere. Just last moth I saw a documentary that had a gaijin who traveled from the furthest point north in the island chain to the most southern point just on trains and ferries. All his in an area just slightly smaller than California.

The first thought I have when watching this channel and I see how they deal with transit, then look at the crap we have in this country, even in large metro areas like NYC and DC, is "why don't we have nice sh*t like this"?

Then I realize where I live, and the mindset of the people here.
 
2014-06-21 05:30:44 PM

loonatic112358: ShutYerBeak: God in Heaven isn't that just the tackiest damn place ever?! I would give up the adrenaline rush of blowing down Highway 21 at 80mph for a train if it meant avoiding Bucees.

It's the best little crap house in texas and the coffee ain't bad, but I avoid it like the plague when it's tourist season


Admittedly, they do have clean rest rooms.
 
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