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(USA Today)   So not only are fish-eating spiders a thing but they're everywhere, too   (usatoday.com) divider line 37
    More: Scary, freshwater fish, University of Western Australia, Southeastern United States, spiders, University of Basel, salamanders, insects  
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9624 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jun 2014 at 5:40 AM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-19 12:24:31 AM  
I'm a Pisces, should I be worried?
 
2014-06-19 02:25:01 AM  
FTFA: the University of Western Australia

I can't believe there aren't active plans for a moon-base while we're trapped on a planet with Australia.
 
2014-06-19 03:16:38 AM  
"Spiders are pretty well known as good hunters, feeding mainly on other insects..."

I stopped reading right there.  Spiders are not insects, they are arachnids.  Insects have 6 legs, spiders have 8.
 
2014-06-19 05:51:37 AM  
I'm moving to Antartica
 
2014-06-19 05:57:46 AM  
Waiting for a fish to swim by:

www.joeydevilla.com
 
2014-06-19 06:03:10 AM  
No need to fear:
www.visualphotos.com
Except for me personally. Spiders are meh. Wasps and hornets scare the living bejesusing crapnuggets out of me.
 
2014-06-19 07:06:40 AM  
Spiders, in my urethra?

It's more likely than you think
 
2014-06-19 07:17:16 AM  
They're here in the USA. I had one drop into my canoe once. Thankfully we had just landed or my wife and son would've flipped the canoe in their rush to jump out of the canoe.
 
2014-06-19 07:21:50 AM  
I honestly read that as "flesh-eating" spiders.
 
2014-06-19 07:57:24 AM  
"Most of these fish-killing spiders are semi-aquatic"

youdontsay.jpg
 
2014-06-19 07:59:22 AM  
I figured these were pretty common, just usually away from cities. Here in Nova Scotia, I've seen a large number of "fishing spiders" over the past couple of years. They perform just like the article says (anchor hind legs at water's edge). They will also hop the surf to get away from you. Around here, they are about the size of an adult hand (that I've seen). They also seem to hiss when threatened.
 
2014-06-19 08:03:28 AM  
Fish-eating spiders? In my day, we called them crabs.
 
2014-06-19 08:08:25 AM  

Copperbelly watersnake: They're here in the USA. I had one drop into my canoe once. Thankfully we had just landed or my wife and son would've flipped the canoe in their rush to jump out of the canoe.


You said canoe three times.
 
2014-06-19 08:20:12 AM  

bikerbob59: Copperbelly watersnake: They're here in the USA. I had one drop into my canoe once. Thankfully we had just landed or my wife and son would've flipped the canoe in their rush to jump out of the canoe.

You said canoe three times.


Maybe he likes canoes

Smoking GNU: No need to fear:
[www.visualphotos.com image 650x452]
Except for me personally. Spiders are meh. Wasps and hornets scare the living bejesusing crapnuggets out of me.


Wasps and hornets don't bother me. It's spiders that scare the living bejesus out of me. Well, not all spiders. But a lot of them.
 
2014-06-19 08:32:59 AM  
I assumed this was a well-known behavior, and that it was common for some species. I've seen it take place. The spider was what I assumed to be related to a wolf spider (though wikipedia suggests not), but they were of similar sizes and superficially of similar body shape. These aren't the orb weaver, sit around and wait for a meal kind of spiders, they are fast and semi-active hunters.

Anyway, they're very common around these parts, particularly around streams and ponds with grassy banks. The biggest fish I've seen them eat and catch were mosquito fish / minnows. We're not talking about a spider that can catch a catfish or anything.
 
2014-06-19 08:39:39 AM  
I'm more worried about smart spiders.

The portia genus is too smart for my comfort level.  TO THE WIKI!
 
2014-06-19 08:39:52 AM  

bikerbob59: Copperbelly watersnake: They're here in the USA. I had one drop into my canoe once. Thankfully we had just landed or my wife and son would've flipped the canoe in their rush to jump out of the canoe.

You said canoe three times.


You count words in a post.
 
2014-06-19 08:45:51 AM  
Damn nature, you scary!
 
2014-06-19 08:51:35 AM  
Spiders have been around LONG before insects made the scene. They obviously had to eat somehow, so some that tried water as a new hunting ground (so to speak) were rewarded.

I remember seeing an episode of QI where they talked about why there are things like sea spiders but not sea insects, and it came down to the theory that insects developed along with exclusively land-based flowering plants and trees (angiosperms) 160 MYA, which was well after spiders existed (~300 MYA) and had already found that water was a good place to hunt. Insect evolution was just an added bonus for the spiders. "Yay! More food!"

/The More You Know
 
2014-06-19 08:56:06 AM  

Smoking GNU: No need to fear:
[www.visualphotos.com image 650x452]
Except for me personally. Spiders are meh. Wasps and hornets scare the living bejesusing crapnuggets out of me.


Polka band name.
 
2014-06-19 09:05:38 AM  
The study in the journal PLOS ONE ...

What's the matter, buddy, couldn't get it published in a good journal?

On a less serious note, I finally got around to watching Big Ass Spider. Those people were having way too much fun making that movie.
 
2014-06-19 09:23:22 AM  
Not sure why this is a big deal all of a sudden. Spiders have been known to eat...

Lizards
pixdaus.com

Birds
matem1.files.wordpress.com

Bats
www.csmonitor.com

Robert Smith:
i86.photobucket.com
 
2014-06-19 09:29:33 AM  
Cool spider story time.  Up in the Algonquin, Muskoka and Haliburton Highlands area of Ontario, Canada lives a spider called The Dock Spider.  It's also called the fishing spider or minnow spider -and the local sciencey-minded  people call them nursery web spiders because they keep their thousand or so babies in a small web.  Most are a few inches long, a few can become about 6 inches long body and legs, and a few lucky ladies manage to live several years and grow to mammoth proportions.  They aren't rare, but they are often overlooked because their coloration matches the rocks that rim many of these deep cold lakes.  Here's the one that lives under and around the dock at the family cottages
www.lincatz.com
This lovely lady is a bit larger than a DVD and blends in quite well with her surroundings.  Occasionally she likes to sun herself on the dock itself, where her greyness blends in with the weathered wood even more successfully than with the rocks. Her fangs can go through flip flops -but not crocs. They usually are quite docile and don't bite, but a big human foot stomping near them will rouse them into a biting frenzy.  As much as I despise crocs -it's what is needed to avoid nasty surprises when one inevitably steps on one of these. If we swim under the dock there's a webbed net with her little progeny all consuming large numbers of water critters -including the ubiquitous mosquito. So we take the good: fewer blood suckers -with the bad: giant spiders The science-type name is nopenopenope -I mean dolomedes -the two species of the group are impossible to tell without microscopes.  They are members of the Wolf Spider clan, distant relatives to tarantulas.  Shortly after this picture was taken she returned to the water's edge where she calmly caught and devoured a small minnow.
 
2014-06-19 09:41:19 AM  
Spiders, wasps and bees freak me out...I really have to remember not to come into spider threads....
 
2014-06-19 09:49:20 AM  

20/20: I honestly read that as "flesh-eating" spiders.


I don't think many spiders are herbivores, so aren't most of spiders flesh-eating spiders?
 
2014-06-19 10:02:35 AM  

xria: 20/20: I honestly read that as "flesh-eating" spiders.

I don't think many spiders are herbivores, so aren't most of spiders flesh-eating spiders?


A lot of them eat spiders.
I like jumping spiders, they can do some cool things, and they're smart.
Sometimes they watch TV (not sure if that makes them smart, tho).
 
2014-06-19 10:09:26 AM  

MrHappyRotter: I assumed this was a well-known behavior, and that it was common for some species. I've seen it take place. The spider was what I assumed to be related to a wolf spider (though wikipedia suggests not), but they were of similar sizes and superficially of similar body shape. These aren't the orb weaver, sit around and wait for a meal kind of spiders, they are fast and semi-active hunters.

Anyway, they're very common around these parts, particularly around streams and ponds with grassy banks. The biggest fish I've seen them eat and catch were mosquito fish / minnows. We're not talking about a spider that can catch a catfish or anything.


Good. Fishing's tough enough without more competition.

/doesn't fish for the fish ;-)
 
2014-06-19 10:15:34 AM  

smd31: Spiders, wasps and bees freak me out...I really have to remember not to come into spider threads....


Bees don't bother me.  Wasps and hornets?  They're just capricious fewkars....
 
2014-06-19 11:04:59 AM  
I particularly liked this part "Researchers still don't know the full extent of the nutritional value of fish, but it is most likely "high quality prey," Nyffeler said. The researchers hope to conduct a new study expanding on their findings."
There is a bold new topic that bears investigating! Pass me another pop tart and a mountain dew while I study this spider...
 
2014-06-19 11:43:49 AM  

20/20: I honestly read that as "flesh-eating" spiders.


Oh good. I'm not the only one
 
2014-06-19 11:45:53 AM  
Working at a sushi bar, I know about these things, and let me tell you they're worst then mice. I'll be cutting fish and a $50 loin of maguro will just start drifting towards the ceiling. It's ridiculous.
 
2014-06-19 12:04:05 PM  

Lincatz: Cool spider story time.  Up in the Algonquin, Muskoka and Haliburton Highlands area of Ontario, Canada lives a spider called The Dock Spider.  It's also called the fishing spider or minnow spider -and the local sciencey-minded  people call them nursery web spiders because they keep their thousand or so babies in a small web.  Most are a few inches long, a few can become about 6 inches long body and legs, and a few lucky ladies manage to live several years and grow to mammoth proportions.  They aren't rare, but they are often overlooked because their coloration matches the rocks that rim many of these deep cold lakes.  Here's the one that lives under and around the dock at the family cottages
[www.lincatz.com image 641x656]
This lovely lady is a bit larger than a DVD and blends in quite well with her surroundings.  Occasionally she likes to sun herself on the dock itself, where her greyness blends in with the weathered wood even more successfully than with the rocks. Her fangs can go through flip flops -but not crocs. They usually are quite docile and don't bite, but a big human foot stomping near them will rouse them into a biting frenzy.  As much as I despise crocs -it's what is needed to avoid nasty surprises when one inevitably steps on one of these. If we swim under the dock there's a webbed net with her little progeny all consuming large numbers of water critters -including the ubiquitous mosquito. So we take the good: fewer blood suckers -with the bad: giant spiders The science-type name is nopenopenope -I mean dolomedes -the two species of the group are impossible to tell without microscopes.  They are members of the Wolf Spider clan, distant relatives to tarantulas.  Shortly after this picture was taken she returned to the water's edge where she calmly caught and devoured a small minnow.


And this is exactly why I continually admonish my Mother for wanting every spider she finds immediately squished.
 
2014-06-19 12:11:03 PM  

MrHappyRotter: I assumed this was a well-known behavior, and that it was common for some species. I've seen it take place. The spider was what I assumed to be related to a wolf spider (though wikipedia suggests not), but they were of similar sizes and superficially of similar body shape. These aren't the orb weaver, sit around and wait for a meal kind of spiders, they are fast and semi-active hunters.

Anyway, they're very common around these parts, particularly around streams and ponds with grassy banks. The biggest fish I've seen them eat and catch were mosquito fish / minnows. We're not talking about a spider that can catch a catfish or anything.


I would seriously hope not. If spiders ever grow evolved large enough to catch and eat catfish I'm ready to move to MARS.
 
2014-06-19 12:58:57 PM  

lindalouwho: I'm a Pisces, should I be worried?


No need to worry if you are a man, but If you are a women... Well, all I can say is bath often.
 
2014-06-19 01:41:51 PM  

Mein Fuhrer I Can Walk: And this is exactly why I continually admonish my Mother for wanting every spider she finds immediately squished.


I live out in the stix, and we have wolf spiders, some of them pretty big.  It is my hope that some day they will figure out how to eat stinkbugs.
 
2014-06-19 03:21:49 PM  
But new research is showing just how many of them are good at catching - and dining on - fish as well.

I'm really disappointed that these spiders aren't utilizing proper catch-and-release techniques. You would think that a creature that spends its entire life outdoors would be more ecologically responsible.
 
2014-06-19 05:13:32 PM  
Wolf Spider in Wisconsin

oi57.tinypic.com
largest one I've ever seen
 
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