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(ZDNet)   Apple's attempts to double the price of ebooks was more of a design feature than a "conspiracy"   (zdnet.com) divider line 36
    More: Followup, Hachette Book Group, Penguin Group, e-books, HarperCollins Publishers  
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1206 clicks; posted to Business » on 19 Jun 2014 at 12:06 AM (40 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



36 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-18 11:17:31 PM  
Ugh, Amazon is trying to become a monopoly and now has had it's right to continue in that endeavor protected by this legal settlement.

On the other hand, publishing companies are idiots for not realizing that $20+ ebook prices are utterly insane and no one in their right mind wants to pay that.  Heck, $15+ ebooks are insane, for anything published more than six months ago.

Both sides are bad, the consumers are going to get completely screwed either way. Or both ways.  Whatever.
 
2014-06-19 12:22:14 AM  
FTFA decision was called a "victory for millions of ebook readers" by the DoJ

Well ... it was a victory for at least one ebook reader ...

www.theartofdoingstuff.com
 
2014-06-19 12:58:12 AM  
This is part of the reason I'll stick with paper books for awhile.
 
2014-06-19 02:29:07 AM  

SphericalTime: Ugh, Amazon is trying to become a monopoly and now has had it's right to continue in that endeavor protected by this legal settlement.

On the other hand, publishing companies are idiots for not realizing that $20+ ebook prices are utterly insane


Same feeling I have about their battle with Hatchette; it sucks that Amazon is screwing over a smaller publisher, but OTOH, Hatchette was gouging people with their ebook prices and offering shiatty deals to writers.

Amazon is going to become a monopoly because everyone else in their industry are idiots.
 
2014-06-19 02:52:00 AM  
Amazon is just offering a 'less' shiatty deal.
 
2014-06-19 03:04:33 AM  
Would have been interesting to see how much damage it would have done to Steve Jobs "god" image if he was still alive.

Pretty clear that he drove this policy, basically "I can do what I like and to hell with cartel laws" and there was no-one at Apple brave/stupid enough to tell him it was clearly illegal
 
2014-06-19 05:15:16 AM  

mjjt: Would have been interesting to see how much damage it would have done to Steve Jobs "god" image if he was still alive.

Pretty clear that he drove this policy, basically "I can do what I like and to hell with cartel laws" and there was no-one at Apple brave/stupid enough to tell him it was clearly illegal


Jobs didn't give much of a damn about the eBook market. Apple entered it as a throwaway business only because they already had the infrastructure in place (iTunes store, millions of customer cards on file, iPads, ins with publishers to make the deals).

The only problem was Amazon's kamikaze pricing strategy wherein they basically sold eBooks at a loss to prevent anyone else from entering the marketplace. The book publishers saw where this was going, Apple saw where it was going, book industry watchers saw where it was going. The only idiots in the room were the DOJ prosecutors and the judge.

Say what you will about Apple breaking a law (one who's interpretation got severely bent out of shape to wrap Apple up in the charges), but you can thank the DOJ for turning Amazon into the monster it is today.
 
2014-06-19 07:06:27 AM  

dr-shotgun: mjjt: Would have been interesting to see how much damage it would have done to Steve Jobs "god" image if he was still alive.

Pretty clear that he drove this policy, basically "I can do what I like and to hell with cartel laws" and there was no-one at Apple brave/stupid enough to tell him it was clearly illegal

Jobs didn't give much of a damn about the eBook market. Apple entered it as a throwaway business only because they already had the infrastructure in place (iTunes store, millions of customer cards on file, iPads, ins with publishers to make the deals).

The only problem was Amazon's kamikaze pricing strategy wherein they basically sold eBooks at a loss to prevent anyone else from entering the marketplace. The book publishers saw where this was going, Apple saw where it was going, book industry watchers saw where it was going. The only idiots in the room were the DOJ prosecutors and the judge.

Say what you will about Apple breaking a law (one who's interpretation got severely bent out of shape to wrap Apple up in the charges), but you can thank the DOJ for turning Amazon into the monster it is today.


How much of the cost of a dead-tree book is contained in the materials, labor, and shipping?  OK, now remove say 90% of that from the cover price of a book.  leave the 10% because online distribution does cost *something* - just far less.  Oh, and don't forget to subtract a large chunk of the sticker price due to the farking DRM technology preventing users from reselling their ebook purchases.  There, you have the actual fair price of a book compared to its paper version.

Ebook versions should cost less than half, maybe even a third, of what dead tree versions cost - with the same profit margin to the author and publisher.
 
2014-06-19 07:15:46 AM  
Not only can you get music and first run porn via torrents, ebooks are available too.
 
2014-06-19 07:37:56 AM  
Lexx:
Ebook versions should cost less than half, maybe even a third, of what dead tree versions cost - with the same profit margin to the author and publisher.

This.

There is no reason other than greed to charge $15 for an ebook, even as a "new release."
 
2014-06-19 08:06:58 AM  

Lexx: dr-shotgun: mjjt: Would have been interesting to see how much damage it would have done to Steve Jobs "god" image if he was still alive.

Pretty clear that he drove this policy, basically "I can do what I like and to hell with cartel laws" and there was no-one at Apple brave/stupid enough to tell him it was clearly illegal

Jobs didn't give much of a damn about the eBook market. Apple entered it as a throwaway business only because they already had the infrastructure in place (iTunes store, millions of customer cards on file, iPads, ins with publishers to make the deals).

The only problem was Amazon's kamikaze pricing strategy wherein they basically sold eBooks at a loss to prevent anyone else from entering the marketplace. The book publishers saw where this was going, Apple saw where it was going, book industry watchers saw where it was going. The only idiots in the room were the DOJ prosecutors and the judge.

Say what you will about Apple breaking a law (one who's interpretation got severely bent out of shape to wrap Apple up in the charges), but you can thank the DOJ for turning Amazon into the monster it is today.

How much of the cost of a dead-tree book is contained in the materials, labor, and shipping?  OK, now remove say 90% of that from the cover price of a book.  leave the 10% because online distribution does cost *something* - just far less.  Oh, and don't forget to subtract a large chunk of the sticker price due to the farking DRM technology preventing users from reselling their ebook purchases.  There, you have the actual fair price of a book compared to its paper version.

Ebook versions should cost less than half, maybe even a third, of what dead tree versions cost - with the same profit margin to the author and publisher.


You are woefully overestimating the manufacturing and shipping costs.  The real chunk is usually about a third of the cover price for a frontlist book.  There's a lot of expensive editing, design, and marketing that goes into producing a book.
 
2014-06-19 08:28:14 AM  

Muta: Not only can you get music and first run porn via torrents, ebooks are available too.


That's what someone I know who is certainly not me does. This person who I am not is more than willing to pay a fair price for DRMed ebooks (which he or she estimates to be around $5 for hardcover and $1 for paperback), but requests that the publishers at least by him or her dinner first before trying to charge as much as they do.

To be fair, I understand that there are some books, much like there is some porn, that is very hard to find on torrent sites. Since I have no experience with illegally acquiring intellectual property though, I couldn't possibly comment.
 
2014-06-19 08:42:45 AM  

twat_waffle: Muta: Not only can you get music and first run porn via torrents, ebooks are available too.

That's what someone I know who is certainly not me does. This person who I am not is more than willing to pay a fair price for DRMed ebooks (which he or she estimates to be around $5 for hardcover and $1 for paperback), but requests that the publishers at least by him or her dinner first before trying to charge as much as they do.

To be fair, I understand that there are some books, much like there is some porn, that is very hard to find on torrent sites. Since I have no experience with illegally acquiring intellectual property though, I couldn't possibly comment.


Hardcover and paperback eBooks?
 
2014-06-19 08:44:48 AM  

twat_waffle: This person who I am not is more than willing to pay a fair price for DRMed ebooks (which he or she estimates to be around $5 for hardcover and $1 for paperback),


Oh fark off, you cheap bastard. If books retailed for $1 no author other than Stephen King or JK Rowling would ever make enough to live on.

$10 is a perfectly reasonable price for an ebook. If you can't or won't pay that for ten hours entertainment you're too poor or cheap to be entertained.
 
2014-06-19 08:53:17 AM  
"Bu-bu-but Apple was only fixing prices for our benefit!"

God damn, you Apple fantards are delusional.
 
2014-06-19 08:57:34 AM  

Delta1212: twat_waffle: Muta: Not only can you get music and first run porn via torrents, ebooks are available too.

That's what someone I know who is certainly not me does. This person who I am not is more than willing to pay a fair price for DRMed ebooks (which he or she estimates to be around $5 for hardcover and $1 for paperback), but requests that the publishers at least by him or her dinner first before trying to charge as much as they do.

To be fair, I understand that there are some books, much like there is some porn, that is very hard to find on torrent sites. Since I have no experience with illegally acquiring intellectual property though, I couldn't possibly comment.

Hardcover and paperback eBooks?


If you cheap out and buy paperback eBooks after a few reads your eReader will be a bit bent, with a cracked spine, and probably some pages will missing. So I would definitely recommend only going for the hardbacks, it is better in the long run.
 
2014-06-19 09:10:52 AM  

Gunther: twat_waffle: This person who I am not is more than willing to pay a fair price for DRMed ebooks (which he or she estimates to be around $5 for hardcover and $1 for paperback),

Oh fark off, you cheap bastard. If books retailed for $1 no author other than Stephen King or JK Rowling would ever make enough to live on.

$10 is a perfectly reasonable price for an ebook. If you can't or won't pay that for ten hours entertainment you're too poor or cheap to be entertained.


$10 is a perfectly reasonable price for a new ebook.  Then perhaps $5 after it's a couple years old.  Then perhaps $2 after it's 5 or more years old.  That model of reducing price over time has worked for paper books just fine.  First the expensive hardback, then the cheaper paperback.  Rake in the initial money from people willing to pay a premium then expand your audience with lower prices so that you squeeze as much money out as possible.

Ebook publishers don't want to do that.  They want that $10 forever.  They even want that $10 for older books that they've OCRed and then thrown up on their server without even checking to see if the OCR is clean.  I would happily buy the older Star Trek books for $2 each but I won't pay the $8.99 they want for the poorly formatted versions that they have.
 
2014-06-19 09:11:34 AM  
Clicked on the link to read the article, didn't make it past the pic of the author:

cdn-static.zdnet.com

Yum.
 
2014-06-19 09:40:01 AM  

Lexx: How much of the cost of a dead-tree book is contained in the materials, labor, and shipping?  OK, now remove say 90% of that from the cover price of a book.  leave the 10% because online distribution does cost *something* - just far less.


You've knocked like... $0.01 off the price, at least if we're talking mass market paperbacks. The physical good of a mass-market paperback is pretty much nonexistent. They cost pennies to print. Bulk shipping makes the shipping costs negligible. Shelf overhead is a fixed expense- bookstores are paying for that square footage whether or not they put books there, so that shouldn't be taken into account, ditto on the labor in shelving/disposing of unused copies.

I think people really fail to understand how worthless paper books are to the publishers. The entire economy of bookselling is built on that fact- the vast majority of books that hit the shelves lose money for the publisher. They make their money on breakout hits, which are rare, and long-tail hits, which are also rare (but turns every published work into an investment). Even hard covers are only worth a few bucks in materials and labor.

The publisher views the  content as the good sold, and from that perspective, their pricing makes perfect sense. Speaking personally, I get far more utility from a DRM-free eBook than I do from a paper book- by that logic I should be paying a premium for eBooks, not expecting them to be cheaper.
 
2014-06-19 09:45:55 AM  

umad: "Bu-bu-but Apple was only fixing prices for our benefit!"


Apple wasn't fixing prices. Apple was telling publishers that they'd all get the same agreement from Apple. The publishers all agreed among each other that they wanted to stop Amazon's wholesaling prices and wanted Apple to help them on that. It's not so much what was  done that's the problem, as much as what was  said. Publishers discussed prices and Apple was part of those discussions.

Amazon and the DoJ were arguing that, without those discussions, the shift to the agency model would never have happened (seeing the relationship between the publishers as a prisoner's dilemma scenario, the discussions allowed them to cooperate where defection might have been the stronger individual strategy).

Regardless, the conversation between Apple and the publishers seems to have basically gone this way:
Apple:You can set prices yourself, we don't care what they are.
Publishers:We want to raise prices out of Amazon's basement.
Apple:You can set prices yourself. Just remember that you can't undercut us.
Publishers:So we can raise prices?
Apple: Are you farking retarded? It's an agency agreement. You can set the price to whatever you want. We take a 30% cut.
Publishers:So we can raise prices?
 
2014-06-19 10:12:23 AM  
The whole 'agency' model was ridiculous and I don't see why anyone would think it makes sense.  Amazon should be able to sell the books for whatever they want, as long as the publisher gets the price per book that was agreed upon.  Why would they care after the fact what someone who retails their product sells it for?
 
2014-06-19 10:18:25 AM  

t3knomanser: Apple:You can set prices yourself. Just remember that you can't undercut us.


Meaning "Amazon must charge the same price we do even if they aren't taking a 30% cut like we are." AKA price-fixing.

The farking courts slapped you idiots and Apple down, and you still think you are in the right. Like I said, delusional.
 
2014-06-19 10:26:39 AM  
On a typical hardcover, the publisher sets a suggested retail price. Let's say it is $26. The bookseller will generally pay the publisher $13. Out of that gross revenue, the publisher pays about $3.25 to print, store and ship the book, including unsold copies returned to the publisher by booksellers.For cover design, typesetting and copy-editing, the publisher pays about 80 cents. Marketing costs average around $1 but may go higher or lower depending on the title. Most of these costs will decline on a per-unit basis as a book sells more copies.


http://magazine.good.is/articles/how-much-do-books-really-cost-to-mak e

Publishers don't have to drop the 3.25, which is a big deal for books that bomb.

Apple is eating less than the bookseller.

$10 seems way to high, especially for books that could be old and I as the end buyer can't re-sell.
 
2014-06-19 10:34:59 AM  
The book publishers are exactly like the music industry in 2000. For decades new books were $35 hardbacks (often with ridiculous margins and font sizes to push up the page count). Given that they were the content producers, they should have been the ones to have controlled e-books. But they were lazy, and their high prices made it easy for Amazon to come in and undercut them.
 
2014-06-19 10:39:08 AM  
Here's a thought: will e-books become so popular with libraries that publisher stop allowing libraries to have e-books because they're cutting into their sales?

I rarely buy any books anymore because the NY Public Library has such an amazing e-book collection. I borrow way more than I ever did before because I don't even need to leave my home to get the books, and, e-books remove the ick factor of handling a book that some jackass might have read on the toilet.
 
2014-06-19 11:32:51 AM  

umad: Meaning "Amazon must charge the same price we do even if they aren't taking a 30% cut like we are." AKA price-fixing.


Nooooooo. Meaning that they can't give Amazon a better price. The "most favored nation" clause has nothing to do with price fixing, and is a perfectly legal clause. It is  not why Apple got in trouble. It's a very standard clause in a lot of business agreements.

Apple got in trouble because they were party to discussions where the publishers explicitly stated they wanted to raise prices.  That's what was illegal. Not the most favored nation clause.

umad: The farking courts slapped you idiots and Apple down, and you still think you are in the right.


You may have read my post, but you didn't understand it, Otto.
 
2014-06-19 12:00:19 PM  

t3knomanser: umad: Meaning "Amazon must charge the same price we do even if they aren't taking a 30% cut like we are." AKA price-fixing.

Nooooooo. Meaning that they can't give Amazon a better price. The "most favored nation" clause has nothing to do with price fixing, and is a perfectly legal clause. It is  not why Apple got in trouble. It's a very standard clause in a lot of business agreements.

Apple got in trouble because they were party to discussions where the publishers explicitly stated they wanted to raise prices.  That's what was illegal. Not the most favored nation clause.

umad: The farking courts slapped you idiots and Apple down, and you still think you are in the right.

You may have read my post, but you didn't understand it, Otto.


"They didn't fix prices, but they fixed prices. But not intentionally. It wasn't their fault. I swear. They just happened to overhear something they shouldn't have. NOW LEAVE APPLE ALONE!!!"

Delusional. If only there was a way to look up what really happened. It would be really handy if this thread linked to some more information on the subject or something. Something like:

Manhattan-based U.S. District Judge Denise Cote has ordered the parties to submit filings detailing the terms of the settlement within 30 days, but the details have not been revealed and must still be approved in court.

In 2012, the U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ) accused Apple and five publishers of ebook price fixing, and since then, 33 states have sued Apple on behalf of their consumers. In addition, a class action lawsuit has also been filed by individual consumers.

In a non-jury hearing last year, Cote concluded that Apple orchestrated the conspiracy. The publishers accused of conspiring to fix ebook prices -- Hachette Book Group, HarperCollins Publishers, Penguin Group (USA) Inc, Macmillan and CBS-owned Simon & Schuster (ZDNet is also owned by CBS) -- agreed to pay over $160 million in settlement charges.

Originally, the state attorneys general sought $280 million in damages from Apple, but this was tripled following Cote's ruling, to $840 million. However, Apple is appealing Cote's decision, and the settlement -- as well as any damages payment -- is dependent on the outcome of such an appeal. The settlement out of court may have also been designed to avoid the tripled damages sought.


Yeah, the courts only went after Apple for 5x the fine they threw at the publishers because they felt like being big meanies. It wasn't because Apple was abso-farking-lutely guilty of what they were accused of or anything. They wouldn't do such a thing. They can do no wrong.
 
2014-06-19 01:56:55 PM  

umad: "They didn't fix prices, but they fixed prices. But not intentionally. It wasn't their fault. I swear. They just happened to overhear something they shouldn't have. NOW LEAVE APPLE ALONE!!!"


You are an idiot, aren't you. I'm not defending Apple. I'm pointing out that the idea that the most favored nation clause had anything to do with it is  wrong. I'm further pointing out that it's not the  actions that were taken which were wrong- it was the conversations which led to those actions. Apple facilitated collusion amongst publishers. This wasn't specifically because Apple had any interests in getting the publishers colluding, but because they wanted to bring the publishers into their pricing model. Apple misconducted operations and was punished for it.

People are upset because despite the price fixing, Amazon in a monospony. It's questionable whether Apple would have broken that hold at all, whether they facilitated collusion or not, but anybody interested in free markets would have  liked it if Apple (or anybody, really, but Apple stands the strongest chance at this juncture) could have done that. Essentially, the relationship between Amazon and publishers is the same relationship that we had between Apple and music labels a decade ago. The publishers aren't any happier about the arrangement, and are going to take any measure to avoid it. Apple could have helped themselves by being more careful in their dealings with the publishers.

Now, I have no love for anybody involved- none of these companies is my personal friend, and they'd all fark me if given the opportunity. My overall issue here is that Amazon's ability to fark me has only  grown since this decision.
 
2014-06-19 03:01:42 PM  

t3knomanser: umad: "They didn't fix prices, but they fixed prices. But not intentionally. It wasn't their fault. I swear. They just happened to overhear something they shouldn't have. NOW LEAVE APPLE ALONE!!!"

You are an idiot, aren't you. I'm not defending Apple. I'm pointing out that the idea that the most favored nation clause had anything to do with it is  wrong. I'm further pointing out that it's not the  actions that were taken which were wrong- it was the conversations which led to those actions. Apple facilitated collusion amongst publishers. This wasn't specifically because Apple had any interests in getting the publishers colluding, but because they wanted to bring the publishers into their pricing model. Apple misconducted operations and was punished for it.

People are upset because despite the price fixing, Amazon in a monospony. It's questionable whether Apple would have broken that hold at all, whether they facilitated collusion or not, but anybody interested in free markets would have  liked it if Apple (or anybody, really, but Apple stands the strongest chance at this juncture) could have done that. Essentially, the relationship between Amazon and publishers is the same relationship that we had between Apple and music labels a decade ago. The publishers aren't any happier about the arrangement, and are going to take any measure to avoid it. Apple could have helped themselves by being more careful in their dealings with the publishers.

Now, I have no love for anybody involved- none of these companies is my personal friend, and they'd all fark me if given the opportunity. My overall issue here is that Amazon's ability to fark me has only  grown since this decision.


Nice turd polishing. Apple colluded to raise the price of ebooks, plain and simple. Amzn keeps fighting to keep them low but somehow that's what you are afraid of.

So far I have gleaned that you would prefer ebook prices be higher.
 
2014-06-19 03:37:20 PM  

Delta1212: twat_waffle: Muta: Not only can you get music and first run porn via torrents, ebooks are available too.

That's what someone I know who is certainly not me does. This person who I am not is more than willing to pay a fair price for DRMed ebooks (which he or she estimates to be around $5 for hardcover and $1 for paperback), but requests that the publishers at least by him or her dinner first before trying to charge as much as they do.

To be fair, I understand that there are some books, much like there is some porn, that is very hard to find on torrent sites. Since I have no experience with illegally acquiring intellectual property though, I couldn't possibly comment.

Hardcover and paperback eBooks?


I'm referring to the availability of their dead tree counterparts.
 
2014-06-19 04:11:20 PM  

twat_waffle: Delta1212: twat_waffle: Muta: Not only can you get music and first run porn via torrents, ebooks are available too.

That's what someone I know who is certainly not me does. This person who I am not is more than willing to pay a fair price for DRMed ebooks (which he or she estimates to be around $5 for hardcover and $1 for paperback), but requests that the publishers at least by him or her dinner first before trying to charge as much as they do.

To be fair, I understand that there are some books, much like there is some porn, that is very hard to find on torrent sites. Since I have no experience with illegally acquiring intellectual property though, I couldn't possibly comment.

Hardcover and paperback eBooks?

I'm referring to the availability of their dead tree counterparts.


Why does that matter?
 
2014-06-19 04:28:02 PM  

Gunther: twat_waffle: This person who I am not is more than willing to pay a fair price for DRMed ebooks (which he or she estimates to be around $5 for hardcover and $1 for paperback),

Oh fark off, you cheap bastard. If books retailed for $1 no author other than Stephen King or JK Rowling would ever make enough to live on.

$10 is a perfectly reasonable price for an ebook. If you can't or won't pay that for ten hours entertainment you're too poor or cheap to be entertained.


First, ebooks have less overhead. Second, DRM means I have less freedom to do as I wish with what I have purchased, so there is less value in it for me. Third, the price points are somewhat negotiable, and $1 was not the only number I mentioned. Fourth, I've seen and read good ebooks that were priced at around the $1-2 area. My Kindle is full of them.

$10 may be a reasonable price for a new release ebook from a well-known author like Brandon Sanderson or George R.R. Martin. It is not reasonable for a ghostwritten Tom Clancy novel.

I pay for most of my entertainment. I am an Amazon Prime member and I subscribe to Netflix. Offer me a fair price and give me what I want for that fair price, and I'll buy.
 
2014-06-19 04:29:57 PM  

Delta1212: twat_waffle: Delta1212: twat_waffle: Muta: Not only can you get music and first run porn via torrents, ebooks are available too.

That's what someone I know who is certainly not me does. This person who I am not is more than willing to pay a fair price for DRMed ebooks (which he or she estimates to be around $5 for hardcover and $1 for paperback), but requests that the publishers at least by him or her dinner first before trying to charge as much as they do.

To be fair, I understand that there are some books, much like there is some porn, that is very hard to find on torrent sites. Since I have no experience with illegally acquiring intellectual property though, I couldn't possibly comment.

Hardcover and paperback eBooks?

I'm referring to the availability of their dead tree counterparts.

Why does that matter?


Because mass market paperbacks tend to be cheaper than books only available in hardcover, abd I think that ebook pricing should reflect that, if only so that newer books offer greater returns.
 
2014-06-19 04:41:55 PM  

JohnBigBootay: Apple colluded to raise the price of ebooks, plain and simple.


I debate the "simple" part, but rarely is anything in business of this scale simple.

JohnBigBootay: Amzn keeps fighting to keep them low but somehow that's what you are afraid of.


Amazon is not fighting Apple. Amazon is fighting the publishers. Apple, as far as Amazon is concerned, is just a proxy for the publishers. And this touches on the underlying problem: Amazon is clearly using its monospony power to distort the market (see: blacklisting Hachette). Apple, as a new entrant into the market, had no real power, and its attempts at collusion wouldn't have netted it much unless Amazon caved to the publishers on the agency model (which Amazon did, regardless of Apple's machinations, because their suppliers wanted agency).

That's a sign of a completely broken marketplace. Apple violated the letter of the law, but Amazon flaunts the spirit. The publishers, of course, are simply idiot dinosaurs, flailing around, fighting Amazon on one hand, and giving Amazon glorious gifts like demanding their vendor-locking DRM be slapped on every book sold. Nobody's a hero in this story-  everybody's a farking villain. Amazon is the largest and most powerful of the villains.
 
2014-06-19 07:03:34 PM  
I'm a small publisher who also reads a lot of and IMO, Amazon is the good guy, not the bad.

From a publishing stand point, it's pretty simple - the publisher sets the purchase price, and Amazon pays a royality to the publisher.

For e-books priced under $9.99, they pay 70%, for e-books priced $10.00 and up, they pay 35%  I'm no accountant, but it seems to me if you are a publisher and you sell your e-books for more than $10.00, but less than $20.00, you're  not really interested in e-book sales.  Maybe you want to prop up the price of your hard cover books or something.

But the fact is, they're making less on an e-book priced at 16.99 than they would make on an e-book priced at 9.99.

As a reader, some publishers are coming around - there's a ton of good stuff out there in the 5-10 dollar range.
 
2014-06-20 12:53:54 AM  

twat_waffle: First, ebooks have less overhead


As others have pointed out, only a few dollars less at most. Most of the price of the book goes to stuff they'd still have to pay for if they didn't make paper books.

twat_waffle: Second, DRM means I have less freedom to do as I wish with what I have purchased, so there is less value in it for me


exactly what value are you getting? are you reselling books to second hand stores for a couple bucks each? That's not gonna knock the price of a twenty dollar book down to 1-5 dollars.
 
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