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(New York Daily News)   If you want to convince skeptical doctors that you actually are having a stroke, keep your smartphone handy (w/ video of what having a stroke looks like)   (nydailynews.com) divider line 15
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808 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Jun 2014 at 12:27 PM (45 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



15 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2014-06-18 09:15:43 AM  
That's some might fine doctorin there farksticks.
 
2014-06-18 11:23:01 AM  
She's malingering to get those addictive stroke drugs.
 
2014-06-18 12:41:01 PM  
Well, that wasn't technically a stroke, it was probably a TIA.
 
2014-06-18 01:11:58 PM  

BigLuca: Well, that wasn't technically a stroke, it was probably a TIA.


TIAs are still strokes.
 
2014-06-18 01:20:15 PM  
Most folks who have strokes can barely croak let alone operate a phone and video tape themselves. If you can actually pull out your phone, record the stroke, and keep the video orientation horizontal, how bad can it be?
 
2014-06-18 01:20:50 PM  
Yes, I know there's no video tape in a phone.

Heh.
 
2014-06-18 01:31:58 PM  

ReverendJynxed: Most folks who have strokes can barely croak let alone operate a phone and video tape themselves. If you can actually pull out your phone, record the stroke, and keep the video orientation horizontal, how bad can it be?


How many strokes have you seen? IANAD, but here's the Cincinatti Prehospital Stroke Scale which has a reasonably high specificity. Granted, there could be something else going on such as Bell's Palsy, but someone doesn't have to be incapacitated to be having a stroke. Also, since you can't diagnose where the stroke is occurring with a phone, it's sort of irresponsible to say it's non-emergent when you don't know which part of the brain is deprived of blood due to lack of blood flow (ischemia) or because a vessel burst (hemorrhagic).
 
2014-06-18 01:58:20 PM  

Summoner101: ReverendJynxed: Most folks who have strokes can barely croak let alone operate a phone and video tape themselves. If you can actually pull out your phone, record the stroke, and keep the video orientation horizontal, how bad can it be?

How many strokes have you seen? IANAD, but here's the Cincinatti Prehospital Stroke Scale which has a reasonably high specificity. Granted, there could be something else going on such as Bell's Palsy, but someone doesn't have to be incapacitated to be having a stroke. Also, since you can't diagnose where the stroke is occurring with a phone, it's sort of irresponsible to say it's non-emergent when you don't know which part of the brain is deprived of blood due to lack of blood flow (ischemia) or because a vessel burst (hemorrhagic).


She raised her eyebrows a couple times.
 
2014-06-18 02:05:02 PM  

Summoner101: BigLuca: Well, that wasn't technically a stroke, it was probably a TIA.

TIAs are still strokes.


?
They really aren't.  Strokes cause cell death, TIAs don't. .
 
2014-06-18 02:25:41 PM  

Summoner101: ReverendJynxed: Most folks who have strokes can barely croak let alone operate a phone and video tape themselves. If you can actually pull out your phone, record the stroke, and keep the video orientation horizontal, how bad can it be?

How many strokes have you seen? IANAD, but here's the Cincinatti Prehospital Stroke Scale which has a reasonably high specificity. Granted, there could be something else going on such as Bell's Palsy, but someone doesn't have to be incapacitated to be having a stroke. Also, since you can't diagnose where the stroke is occurring with a phone, it's sort of irresponsible to say it's non-emergent when you don't know which part of the brain is deprived of blood due to lack of blood flow (ischemia) or because a vessel burst (hemorrhagic).


Seen a few actually. Happens all the time at the VFW.
 
2014-06-18 02:40:09 PM  
headline says "stoke"

therefore, not a stroke.
 
2014-06-18 02:45:34 PM  

BigLuca: Summoner101: BigLuca: Well, that wasn't technically a stroke, it was probably a TIA.

TIAs are still strokes.

?
They really aren't.  Strokes cause cell death, TIAs don't. .


TIAs can cause cell death as well since TIAs ARE ischemic strokes except they resolve themselves within 24 hours without fibrinolytics or surgery. Cell death in the brain takes minutes.
 
2014-06-18 03:23:49 PM  

Summoner101: BigLuca: Summoner101: BigLuca: Well, that wasn't technically a stroke, it was probably a TIA.

TIAs are still strokes.

?
They really aren't.  Strokes cause cell death, TIAs don't. .

TIAs can cause cell death as well since TIAs ARE ischemic strokes except they resolve themselves within 24 hours without fibrinolytics or surgery. Cell death in the brain takes minutes.


Ah, I see where we differ. You are using the older, time based definition of TIA.  The one used modernly is a tissue based definition.  If there is tissue death it is an infarction (stroke), if there is no tissue death it is a TIA. Period.  It makes categorizing simpler since you don't need to look at timing and symptoms and all that.

From UpToDate:
Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is a brief episode of neurologic dysfunction resulting from focal temporary cerebral ischemia not associated with cerebral infarction.

TIA was originally defined clinically by the temporary nature (<24 hours) of the associated neurologic symptoms. However, the arbitrary nature of the 24-hour time limit and lack of specific pathophysiologic meaning hampered the clinical and research utility of the term "TIA." Recognition of these problems led to a change to a tissue-based definition of TIA. The change was driven by advances in neuroimaging that enabled very early identification of ischemic brain injury.

As endorsed by consensus statements from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA), transient ischemic attack (TIA) is defined as a transient episode of neurologic dysfunction caused by focal brain, spinal cord, or retinal ischemia, without acute infarction [1]. Central nervous system (CNS) infarction is defined as brain, spinal cord, or retinal cell death attributable to ischemia, based on neuropathologic, neuroimaging, and/or clinical evidence of permanent injury [2]. Ischemic stroke is defined as an episode of neurologic dysfunction caused by focal cerebral, spinal, or retinal infarction. Silent CNS infarction is defined as imaging or neuropathological evidence of CNS infarction without a history of acute neurological dysfunction attributable to the lesion.
 
2014-06-18 03:24:47 PM  
Why would i want to convince my doctor i'm having a stroke?

that's a bit personal to be telling your doctor.  it's none of his business.  unless you're having phone sex with your doctor.
 
2014-06-18 07:53:39 PM  
Some of the posters in this thread were born with a stroke it seems.
 
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