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(NPR)   Unemployed Millennial with student debt? Logging industry is always hiring. Just ask Dexter   (npr.org) divider line 11
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5944 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jun 2014 at 6:14 AM (10 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-18 07:42:44 AM
3 votes:
This is like that bullshiat "Just go to North Dakota!" advice, isn't it?

When I was 25 and had just gotten married, I went to Wyoming for a year to do to the oilfield thing.  My wife had some student loans and had just received Lasik and we both had cars to pay off.  I paid off everything and saved up enough money to fark off somewhere else for an easier job in a year.  As a healthy, athletic 25 year old that job broke me down.  14 hours a day, 7 days a week, for as many as 19 weeks in a row of alternating heavy labor and mind-numbing tedium without a single day off in that weather (and new guys get the night shift) was enough for me.

I'm a college student again now and looking around at the other college seniors I know maybe one or two out of ten young men I meet could do that kind of work.  Maybe one out of twenty young women.

The worst part is most of the people who did it for the "great" pay just spend it on trucks, clothes, trips somewhere expensive when they do get days off, or way more house than they can afford (and don't get to live in anyway).  Other than myself I didn't know a single guy who started that $90K/year job and didn't accumulate at least six figures worth of debt before the end of the first year, and I didn't know many new guys who made it through a year.
2014-06-18 01:27:15 AM
3 votes:
Good luck with that. My dad logged for 40 years. He retired at 75 years old. He really should be dead after cutting himself open several times and breaking his neck not once, not twice, but THREE times.

At 75 he was the oldest logger he or anybody else had ever known.
2014-06-18 07:59:52 AM
2 votes:

Koodz: This is like that bullshiat "Just go to North Dakota!" advice, isn't it?

When I was 25 and had just gotten married, I went to Wyoming for a year to do to the oilfield thing.  My wife had some student loans and had just received Lasik and we both had cars to pay off.  I paid off everything and saved up enough money to fark off somewhere else for an easier job in a year.  As a healthy, athletic 25 year old that job broke me down.  14 hours a day, 7 days a week, for as many as 19 weeks in a row of alternating heavy labor and mind-numbing tedium without a single day off in that weather (and new guys get the night shift) was enough for me.

I'm a college student again now and looking around at the other college seniors I know maybe one or two out of ten young men I meet could do that kind of work.  Maybe one out of twenty young women.

The worst part is most of the people who did it for the "great" pay just spend it on trucks, clothes, trips somewhere expensive when they do get days off, or way more house than they can afford (and don't get to live in anyway).  Other than myself I didn't know a single guy who started that $90K/year job and didn't accumulate at least six figures worth of debt before the end of the first year, and I didn't know many new guys who made it through a year.


Uh...

I did 5 winters in the oilfield. I was in my late 20s when I started. I'm also 5'11 and 130 lbs so I'm sure as heck not He-Man.

Where in the deep hades were you working that you did 14 hours? We did 12, because 12 is half a day. The only people I ever heard of that ever stayed more than 6 weeks straight were engineers, the rig pushes, and camp staff. New guys were lease hands, who were on a 2 weeks in/1 out rotation, like the majority of the rest of the crew.

The only reason I'm not still there is a genetic predisposition to peripheral circulatory issues, which goes poorly with -40 temperatures and the fact that I'm now over 40.

And yes, just winter. Northern muskeg doesn't tend to support machinery well unless it's frozen.

Sounds to me like you had an incredibly sketchy employer.
2014-06-18 07:52:04 AM
2 votes:
Yes. I can go out into the woods with a bunch of alcoholic ex-cons and get crushed to death or sliced in half when one of them screws up.

That's livin'. That's a real man's livin'.
2014-06-18 06:53:11 AM
2 votes:
The 10 Deadliest Jobs:
1. Logging workers
2. Fishers and related fishing workers
3. Aircraft pilot and flight engineers
4. Roofers
5. Structural iron and steel workers
6. Refuse and recyclable material collectors
7. Electrical power-line installers and repairers
8. Drivers/sales workers and truck drivers
9. Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers
10. Construction laborers

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2013/08/22/americas-10-de ad liest-jobs-2/

Welcome to the new middle class in America, where the expectations that you will work yourself to death are higher than they've ever been.
2014-06-18 06:47:02 AM
2 votes:
It's almost like people don't want to work in a hyper dangerous career with no long term benefits, an unstable monetary reward and guaranteed health risk for "almost middle class in bumfark nowhere" rewards
2014-06-18 09:09:33 AM
1 votes:
Born and raised in Oregon.  My grandfather, all my uncles, my father and step-father were all loggers.  My brother did it for awhile too before grandpa begged him to do something better with his life.

Not many kids these days see anything glamorous about destroying nature.  Especially the part where you wake up before dawn to drive an hour or two into the mountains.  Break time?  Piss on a tree, eat some cold sandwiches and get back to work. Another hour or two drive and you're home after dark to bolt down dinner and crawl into bed.  Wife?  Kids?  Interacting with them will have to wait until your day off.  Which you'll spend sleeping.  And scratching your poison oak.

Everyone has accidents.  Dislocated shoulders, cuts, infections, falls etc.  My father gashed his leg open and was laid up for months.  My grandfather and uncles saw a guy get killed.

Though, my grandfather was built like a brick shiathouse well into his 60s.  So he had that goin' for him, which was nice.
2014-06-18 07:57:40 AM
1 votes:

freewill: Yes. I can go out into the woods with a bunch of alcoholic ex-cons and get crushed to death or sliced in half when one of them screws up.


You said it... brother
2014-06-18 07:36:49 AM
1 votes:

proteus_b: Well, cops are the bad guys to criminals, and debt collectors are the bad guys to people who don't pay their bills and so on... It's not the tow truck drivers' fault that some moran parked his car in a tow zone


Yeah, but people are known to be rational and accepting of their own faults. The tow away guy can get shot for doing his job.

/Especially repo work
2014-06-18 06:38:32 AM
1 votes:

AngryDragon: A little hard work shouldn't kill you, snowflakes.


I rode in a tow truck yesterday and the driver said even though they were starting brand new drivers at $48K a year - they couldn't keep enough long term.  He said half of them quit the first day it rains.  That baffled me - if you qualify (clean driving record) - then it's much better money than you'll pull down at McDonald's or Wal-Mart, and the demand isn't cyclical like construction.
2014-06-18 03:20:20 AM
1 votes:
Would I get to wear high heels, suspenders and a bra?
 
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