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(NPR)   Unemployed Millennial with student debt? Logging industry is always hiring. Just ask Dexter   (npr.org) divider line 94
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5967 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Jun 2014 at 6:14 AM (49 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-18 09:03:19 AM  

Koodz: This is like that bullshiat "Just go to North Dakota!" advice, isn't it?

When I was 25 and had just gotten married, I went to Wyoming for a year to do to the oilfield thing.  My wife had some student loans and had just received Lasik and we both had cars to pay off.  I paid off everything and saved up enough money to fark off somewhere else for an easier job in a year.  As a healthy, athletic 25 year old that job broke me down.  14 hours a day, 7 days a week, for as many as 19 weeks in a row of alternating heavy labor and mind-numbing tedium without a single day off in that weather (and new guys get the night shift) was enough for me.

I'm a college student again now and looking around at the other college seniors I know maybe one or two out of ten young men I meet could do that kind of work.  Maybe one out of twenty young women.

The worst part is most of the people who did it for the "great" pay just spend it on trucks, clothes, trips somewhere expensive when they do get days off, or way more house than they can afford (and don't get to live in anyway).  Other than myself I didn't know a single guy who started that $90K/year job and didn't accumulate at least six figures worth of debt before the end of the first year, and I didn't know many new guys who made it through a year.


So in one year you were able to get completely out of debt and save up for some stuff. Sounds like a better alternative than sitting on your ass, waiting for a job to come to you
 
2014-06-18 09:07:20 AM  
-100 points for reminding me of that shiatty series finale, subby.
 
2014-06-18 09:07:47 AM  

Lsherm: AngryDragon: A little hard work shouldn't kill you, snowflakes.

I rode in a tow truck yesterday and the driver said even though they were starting brand new drivers at $48K a year - they couldn't keep enough long term.  He said half of them quit the first day it rains.  That baffled me - if you qualify (clean driving record) - then it's much better money than you'll pull down at McDonald's or Wal-Mart, and the demand isn't cyclical like construction.


painful headache from reading your thoughts
 
2014-06-18 09:09:33 AM  
Born and raised in Oregon.  My grandfather, all my uncles, my father and step-father were all loggers.  My brother did it for awhile too before grandpa begged him to do something better with his life.

Not many kids these days see anything glamorous about destroying nature.  Especially the part where you wake up before dawn to drive an hour or two into the mountains.  Break time?  Piss on a tree, eat some cold sandwiches and get back to work. Another hour or two drive and you're home after dark to bolt down dinner and crawl into bed.  Wife?  Kids?  Interacting with them will have to wait until your day off.  Which you'll spend sleeping.  And scratching your poison oak.

Everyone has accidents.  Dislocated shoulders, cuts, infections, falls etc.  My father gashed his leg open and was laid up for months.  My grandfather and uncles saw a guy get killed.

Though, my grandfather was built like a brick shiathouse well into his 60s.  So he had that goin' for him, which was nice.
 
2014-06-18 09:13:49 AM  
Medic/logistics on forest fires in the summer, had a gig with a security company as a medic for special events (raves, concerts, rodeos, you name it) for the spring/fall.

I was a medic in the patch too, big surprise. Of course, that meant I didn't work if no one got hurt, which was pretty boring. Since I've got a heavy equipment cert, I usually ended up running some form of machinery. And yeah, I'm glad I didn't have your job. Humping 9 meter sections of pipe is not my idea of fun :P I've spent time humping mud when someone got sick enough to send home, though, that's a biatch.

Fun thing is, you can get the necessary first aid skills in 2 weeks, and another week for the job-specific safety courses (H2S anyone?).  You can make enough money in your first two weeks to get the certs to never have to sling pipe again, presuming you didn't do the schooling first.

PITS in Calgary has a curriculum for people who don't want to start at the bottom. I never looked into it since I already had my skillset, but I'm told it's pretty good. My stepbrother has been on rigs everywhere from Saudi to off the coast of Vietnam, and he's doing VERY well for someone who never has to lift anything more than 20 kilos :P Mind you, he doesn't run them, he fixes them.
 
2014-06-18 09:19:06 AM  

fusillade762: Or you could join ISIS, I hear they have lots of money and are hiring. Their retirement plan is kinda shaky though


I hear they work in a zone of danger...
 
2014-06-18 09:20:51 AM  

Koodz: This is like that bullshiat "Just go to North Dakota!" advice, isn't it?

When I was 25 and had just gotten married, I went to Wyoming for a year to do to the oilfield thing.  My wife had some student loans and had just received Lasik and we both had cars to pay off.  I paid off everything and saved up enough money to fark off somewhere else for an easier job in a year.  As a healthy, athletic 25 year old that job broke me down.  14 hours a day, 7 days a week, for as many as 19 weeks in a row of alternating heavy labor and mind-numbing tedium without a single day off in that weather (and new guys get the night shift) was enough for me.

I'm a college student again now and looking around at the other college seniors I know maybe one or two out of ten young men I meet could do that kind of work.  Maybe one out of twenty young women.

The worst part is most of the people who did it for the "great" pay just spend it on trucks, clothes, trips somewhere expensive when they do get days off, or way more house than they can afford (and don't get to live in anyway).  Other than myself I didn't know a single guy who started that $90K/year job and didn't accumulate at least six figures worth of debt before the end of the first year, and I didn't know many new guys who made it through a year.


I made it to A/B Mate on an ocean tugboat, moving rigs and lay barges and other useful equipment in the gulf.  If you can work eight bells on/off for a couple months on a tug, you can do anything.  (It's kind of like the fishing TV show in the Bering Sea, except not fish.  Headache balls and wet ropes and personnel baskets and needle guns and deck scrapers.  When you're not working on direct service to the rig or barge, you're painting something.

I can't even talk about the occasional severity of the weather.  Some days, it was double static-line protection all day long.  I lost a handful of friends to fire, sinking, crushing, and falling overboard.

After about a year and a half, I asked and got transferred to the onshore dispatching office.  Easy money, baby.

Haven't slept right since that eight bells at a time BS.
 
2014-06-18 09:27:56 AM  

HaywoodJablonski: Koodz: This is like that bullshiat "Just go to North Dakota!" advice, isn't it?

When I was 25 and had just gotten married, I went to Wyoming for a year to do to the oilfield thing.  My wife had some student loans and had just received Lasik and we both had cars to pay off.  I paid off everything and saved up enough money to fark off somewhere else for an easier job in a year.  As a healthy, athletic 25 year old that job broke me down.  14 hours a day, 7 days a week, for as many as 19 weeks in a row of alternating heavy labor and mind-numbing tedium without a single day off in that weather (and new guys get the night shift) was enough for me.

I'm a college student again now and looking around at the other college seniors I know maybe one or two out of ten young men I meet could do that kind of work.  Maybe one out of twenty young women.

The worst part is most of the people who did it for the "great" pay just spend it on trucks, clothes, trips somewhere expensive when they do get days off, or way more house than they can afford (and don't get to live in anyway).  Other than myself I didn't know a single guy who started that $90K/year job and didn't accumulate at least six figures worth of debt before the end of the first year, and I didn't know many new guys who made it through a year.

So in one year you were able to get completely out of debt and save up for some stuff. Sounds like a better alternative than sitting on your ass, waiting for a job to come to you


Definitely was for me. I'm just saying it isn't for everybody, and it isn't necessarily a career.
 
2014-06-18 09:31:07 AM  

Mudd's woman: I found the Dexter finale rather disappointing.

That's all.


I loved it, but I like downer endings.  After all that "trying to be a real person" nonsense, he finally lost the one real relationship that he valued as a normal person might (Deb), and he just gave up on the whole thing and went back to serial killing.  He kept hold of the code by finding a job with a lot of transients and people who die in the workplace.

Coulda done without the big "STORM" Deb disposal, but it was a series finale.
 
2014-06-18 09:44:59 AM  

fireclown: Mudd's woman: I found the Dexter finale rather disappointing.

That's all.

I loved it, but I like downer endings.  After all that "trying to be a real person" nonsense, he finally lost the one real relationship that he valued as a normal person might (Deb), and he just gave up on the whole thing and went back to serial killing.  He kept hold of the code by finding a job with a lot of transients and people who die in the workplace.

Coulda done without the big "STORM" Deb disposal, but it was a series finale.


I see your point. But the whole question mark issue with Hannah and his son was unsatisfying unfinished business IMHO.
 
2014-06-18 09:58:08 AM  

Mudd's woman: I see your point. But the whole question mark issue with Hannah and his son was unsatisfying unfinished business IMHO.


Yup.  And that's OK.   The point of the ending was the Dex just walked away from all of it.  Plus, I figure that the kids were just magically very well cared for by either the worlds greatest and selfless nanny, or by some relatives who were willing to watch  them for long periods of time with no advance notice.  Those kids got a lot of deux ex machina.
 
2014-06-18 10:04:52 AM  

fireclown: Mudd's woman: I see your point. But the whole question mark issue with Hannah and his son was unsatisfying unfinished business IMHO.

Yup.  And that's OK.   The point of the ending was the Dex just walked away from all of it.  Plus, I figure that the kids were just magically very well cared for by either the worlds greatest and selfless nanny, or by some relatives who were willing to watch  them for long periods of time with no advance notice.  Those kids got a lot of deux ex machina.


forgive my confusion -- what other kid was there besides Harrison?
 
2014-06-18 10:07:20 AM  
How about "NOPE!", subby?   It's a deadly occupation in an admittedly "volatile industry" and the owners of the business are "middle class at best."

Doesn't sound like a worthwhile career.


/not a millennial
 
2014-06-18 10:09:40 AM  

Lsherm: I rode in a tow truck yesterday and the driver said even though they were starting brand new drivers at $48K a year - they couldn't keep enough long term.  He said half of them quit the first day it rains.  That baffled me - if you qualify (clean driving record) - then it's much better money than you'll pull down at McDonald's or Wal-Mart, and the demand isn't cyclical like construction.


If you're female, you're probably far less likely to want to be a tow truck driver.  Fear of rape and all that...
 
2014-06-18 10:14:15 AM  

Koodz: When I was 25 and had just gotten married, I went to Wyoming for a year to do to the oilfield thing. My wife had some student loans and had just received Lasik and we both had cars to pay off. I paid off everything and saved up enough money to fark off somewhere else for an easier job in a year. As a healthy, athletic 25 year old that job broke me down. 14 hours a day, 7 days a week, for as many as 19 weeks in a row of alternating heavy labor and mind-numbing tedium without a single day off in that weather (and new guys get the night shift) was enough for me.


Did you get to call yourself a "roustabout"? That would make it pretty much worth it. That's the coolest job title ever.
 
2014-06-18 10:17:37 AM  

rumpelstiltskin: Koodz: When I was 25 and had just gotten married, I went to Wyoming for a year to do to the oilfield thing. My wife had some student loans and had just received Lasik and we both had cars to pay off. I paid off everything and saved up enough money to fark off somewhere else for an easier job in a year. As a healthy, athletic 25 year old that job broke me down. 14 hours a day, 7 days a week, for as many as 19 weeks in a row of alternating heavy labor and mind-numbing tedium without a single day off in that weather (and new guys get the night shift) was enough for me.

Did you get to call yourself a "roustabout"? That would make it pretty much worth it. That's the coolest job title ever.


Alas, I was merely a "hand."
 
2014-06-18 10:18:06 AM  

Mudd's woman: forgive my confusion -- what other kid was there besides Harrison?


Astor and Cody.  His stepchildren with Rita.  Harrison was their child.  He really seemed to like the kids, but at the end, they were pretty much expendable as well.
 
2014-06-18 10:20:37 AM  

WhyteRaven74: I'm pretty sure the public seeing what raging assholes some logging company owners are on AxMen hasn't done the industry any favors.


"I wanna be a crab fisherman!"
 
2014-06-18 10:25:20 AM  

fireclown: Mudd's woman: forgive my confusion -- what other kid was there besides Harrison?

Astor and Cody.  His stepchildren with Rita.  Harrison was their child.  He really seemed to like the kids, but at the end, they were pretty much expendable as well.


ah, thanks for reminding me. At least they had already been pretty much adopted by their grandparents.
 
2014-06-18 10:26:06 AM  
The idea of a barista doing anything that would make him/her sweat is laughable. They didn't go to college just so they had to work when they got out.
 
2014-06-18 10:33:27 AM  

adamatari: Something tells me the money ain't that good, and it's not just the article.

If I wanted to destroy my body and risk my life for a payday, I would either take up commercial diving or try to be a professional athlete. At least both of those pay real money. It sounds a bit like logging doesn't even pay well by the standard of manual trades, so even being a welder or plumber or electrician would be better (and certainly be less dangerous). So either the pay has to go up or it has to get a lot safer and easier.

I know the social standard is "the harder you work with your body and the more you deal with real things, the less you make," but at some point you find nobody will work that hard and take those risks for shiat pay.


Not only that but logging requires a lot of skill and knowledge.

The risk vs. Rewards isn't there.
 
2014-06-18 10:34:32 AM  

X-boxershorts: The 10 Deadliest Jobs:
1. Logging workers
2. Fishers and related fishing workers
3. Aircraft pilot and flight engineers
4. Roofers
5. Structural iron and steel workers
6. Refuse and recyclable material collectors
7. Electrical power-line installers and repairers
8. Drivers/sales workers and truck drivers
9. Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers
10. Construction laborers

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2013/08/22/americas-10-de ad liest-jobs-2/

Welcome to the new middle class in America, where the expectations that you will work yourself to death are higher than they've ever been.


How is aircraft pilot and flight engineer #3?
 
2014-06-18 10:44:01 AM  

mschwenk: How is aircraft pilot and flight engineer #3


It isn't just commercial pilots.

But even with expiramental and "race" or stunt pilots that seems very high...
 
2014-06-18 10:47:04 AM  

liam76: mschwenk: How is aircraft pilot and flight engineer #3

It isn't just commercial pilots.

But even with expiramental and "race" or stunt pilots that seems very high...


Exactly. Plus military pilots aren't in as much danger as they used to be.
 
2014-06-18 10:54:16 AM  
I cut down and cut up firewood for our house of our property, I've had the occasional close call and I only run a saw seasonally on the weekends. Would not want to be a real logger.
 
2014-06-18 11:27:24 AM  
1. Millennial
2. Hard work

Pick one of those.
 
2014-06-18 11:45:37 AM  

The Googles Do Nothing: Manual Labor?  Sounds like something immigrants should do, eh?


Logging is mostly automated now. You're thinking ""I'm a lumberjack and I"m OK" but it's more like this:

www.prenticeforestry.com

mschwenk: liam76: mschwenk: How is aircraft pilot and flight engineer #3
It isn't just commercial pilots.
But even with expiramental and "race" or stunt pilots that seems very high...
Exactly. Plus military pilots aren't in as much danger as they used to be.


Hey, my dad was a flight engineer and he died. Accidents at work. Actually, he died in a plane crash, but there were a lot of accidents with equipment and plane parts and stuff. Those guys have to go out and inspect and repair the planes before every flight, even if it's 20 below.
 
2014-06-18 11:52:29 AM  
You have to be huge and willing to do risky things to be a lumberjack. If they want more workers, we need construction mecha suits like Ripley's loader in Aliens 3 (?).

btw I know somebody who's worked all these jobs including oil/gas prospecting, the latter sounded pretty shady. Some of these companies hire anybody but at rock-bottom wages. They got the most desperate and worst people, like stabby folks and crazy murderers on the run. No joke. They also dealt with some really weird, inbred landowners.
 
2014-06-18 11:56:53 AM  
You know what industry was decimated by the mortgage crisis, and is only 60% recovered?
 
2014-06-18 11:57:33 AM  

Koodz: GrendelMk1: Koodz: This is like that bullshiat "Just go to North Dakota!" advice, isn't it?

When I was 25 and had just gotten married, I went to Wyoming for a year to do to the oilfield thing.  My wife had some student loans and had just received Lasik and we both had cars to pay off.  I paid off everything and saved up enough money to fark off somewhere else for an easier job in a year.  As a healthy, athletic 25 year old that job broke me down.  14 hours a day, 7 days a week, for as many as 19 weeks in a row of alternating heavy labor and mind-numbing tedium without a single day off in that weather (and new guys get the night shift) was enough for me.

I'm a college student again now and looking around at the other college seniors I know maybe one or two out of ten young men I meet could do that kind of work.  Maybe one out of twenty young women.

The worst part is most of the people who did it for the "great" pay just spend it on trucks, clothes, trips somewhere expensive when they do get days off, or way more house than they can afford (and don't get to live in anyway).  Other than myself I didn't know a single guy who started that $90K/year job and didn't accumulate at least six figures worth of debt before the end of the first year, and I didn't know many new guys who made it through a year.

Uh...

I did 5 winters in the oilfield. I was in my late 20s when I started. I'm also 5'11 and 130 lbs so I'm sure as heck not He-Man.

Where in the deep hades were you working that you did 14 hours? We did 12, because 12 is half a day. The only people I ever heard of that ever stayed more than 6 weeks straight were engineers, the rig pushes, and camp staff. New guys were lease hands, who were on a 2 weeks in/1 out rotation, like the majority of the rest of the crew.

The only reason I'm not still there is a genetic predisposition to peripheral circulatory issues, which goes poorly with -40 temperatures and the fact that I'm now over 40.

And yes, just winter. Northern muskeg doesn't tend to support machinery well unless it's frozen.

Sounds to me like you had an incredibly sketchy employer.

Weatherford International. 98 hours a week. You were told its six on, two off, but only if they didn't "need" you. The official rotation meant nothing. I heard from Halliburton and Schlumberger hands that it was better for them, but I'll tell you now that my 1/3 of the big three upstream service companies was shiat.

Wyoming is year round. What did you do with the rest of the year off? That recovery time might have helped you out. Also if I can ask what did you do? I literally carried pipes bigger than you.


This guy, GrendleMk1, worked 5 winters on a drilling rig and think he knows how thole whole oilpatch operates.

He was a seasonal employee, in one small area. Yes, it tends to be busier in the winter, but we're busy most of the rest of the year too.

No wonder he doesn't understand how the other facets work. Barely understands how drilling rigs work outside of northern BC.

Whether on a drilling rig or on a pumper, an hour drive from location to the hotel was average. 12 hr shift, + travel, + crossover/safety meeting .. 14 hours a day, easy.

And if you're travelling in a company truck, that's hours at work (as per every regulatory body involved).
 
2014-06-18 11:58:20 AM  

mike_d85: I think it's time for someone to take a long, hard look at the wood industry.


dick joke?
/lumber biz
/trees are the answer
/wood is good
 
2014-06-18 12:20:17 PM  

Heims: Koodz: GrendelMk1: Koodz: This is like that bullshiat "Just go to North Dakota!" advice, isn't it?

When I was 25 and had just gotten married, I went to Wyoming for a year to do to the oilfield thing.  My wife had some student loans and had just received Lasik and we both had cars to pay off.  I paid off everything and saved up enough money to fark off somewhere else for an easier job in a year.  As a healthy, athletic 25 year old that job broke me down.  14 hours a day, 7 days a week, for as many as 19 weeks in a row of alternating heavy labor and mind-numbing tedium without a single day off in that weather (and new guys get the night shift) was enough for me.

I'm a college student again now and looking around at the other college seniors I know maybe one or two out of ten young men I meet could do that kind of work.  Maybe one out of twenty young women.

The worst part is most of the people who did it for the "great" pay just spend it on trucks, clothes, trips somewhere expensive when they do get days off, or way more house than they can afford (and don't get to live in anyway).  Other than myself I didn't know a single guy who started that $90K/year job and didn't accumulate at least six figures worth of debt before the end of the first year, and I didn't know many new guys who made it through a year.

Uh...

I did 5 winters in the oilfield. I was in my late 20s when I started. I'm also 5'11 and 130 lbs so I'm sure as heck not He-Man.

Where in the deep hades were you working that you did 14 hours? We did 12, because 12 is half a day. The only people I ever heard of that ever stayed more than 6 weeks straight were engineers, the rig pushes, and camp staff. New guys were lease hands, who were on a 2 weeks in/1 out rotation, like the majority of the rest of the crew.

The only reason I'm not still there is a genetic predisposition to peripheral circulatory issues, which goes poorly with -40 temperatures and the fact that I'm now over 40.

And yes, just winter. Northern muskeg doesn't tend to support machinery well unless it's frozen.

Sounds to me like you had an incredibly sketchy employer.

Weatherford International. 98 hours a week. You were told its six on, two off, but only if they didn't "need" you. The official rotation meant nothing. I heard from Halliburton and Schlumberger hands that it was better for them, but I'll tell you now that my 1/3 of the big three upstream service companies was shiat.

Wyoming is year round. What did you do with the rest of the year off? That recovery time might have helped you out. Also if I can ask what did you do? I literally carried pipes bigger than you.

This guy, GrendleMk1, worked 5 winters on a drilling rig and think he knows how thole whole oilpatch operates.

He was a seasonal employee, in one small area. Yes, it tends to be busier in the winter, but we're busy most of the rest of the year too.

No wonder he doesn't understand how the other facets work. Barely understands how drilling rigs work outside of northern BC.

Whether on a drilling rig or on a pumper, an hour drive from location to the hotel was average. 12 hr shift, + travel, + crossover/safety meeting .. 14 hours a day, easy.

And if you're travelling in a company truck, that's hours at work (as per every regulatory body involved).


It's actual work, too. That's rough driving. I suspect it's actually an even worse drive for loggers.
 
2014-06-18 12:20:23 PM  

liam76: mschwenk: How is aircraft pilot and flight engineer #3

It isn't just commercial pilots.

But even with expiramental and "race" or stunt pilots that seems very high...


Crop dusting is fantastically dangerous.  IIRC, agricultural aviation is the most dangerous form of civilian flying because while your expenses depend on how long you're in the air, your revenue depends on how much field you spray.  So it involves executing a lot of very tight, low-altitude, low-airspeed turns at the end of each run to maximize the time you spend spraying chemicals, all while dodging things like power lines and trees.

I believe air ambulance helicopters were second on that list, because they're always flying in a great hurry (your passengers are generally dying, after all), and you're either landing at some ad-hoc site on the side of a road or whatever, or on a heliport on the roof of a building where there are lots of up- and downdrafts, crosswinds, swirling winds, etc.
 
2014-06-18 12:54:11 PM  

Heims: This guy, GrendleMk1, worked 5 winters on a drilling rig and think he knows how thole whole oilpatch operates.
He was a seasonal employee, in one small area. Yes, it tends to be busier in the winter, but we're busy most of the rest of the year too.
No wonder he doesn't understand how the other facets work. Barely understands how drilling rigs work outside of northern BC.
Whether on a drilling rig or on a pumper, an hour drive from location to the hotel was average. 12 hr shift, + travel, + crossover/safety meeting .. 14 hours a day, easy.
And if you're travelling in a company truck, that's hours at work (as per every regulatory body involved).


My neighbor works in the oil fields, everywhere from Alaska to .....he just went to Wyoming. He doesn't get to live at home. He gets to come home when he's laid off. Then he gets another job, somewhere else, and he has to go there. I see him a few times a year.

Sounds exciting, right? Well, I've been living like that too for a couple of years, and I have to tell you: it sucks. Being a transient and living in temporary housing, or a camper, wears on you. To say nothing of the cost of maintaining your vehicle (which HAS to be running at all times), the gas, the hassle of finding a shower, a place to sleep, internet (because you're always looking for the next job)...
great fun when you're in your 20s. And it was too. Not so much fun now that I'm 30 years older.
 
2014-06-18 01:07:20 PM  
Biggest problem is that most people cant pass the drug test.
 
2014-06-18 01:27:49 PM  

stuffy: Biggest problem is that most people cant pass the drug test.


nah.  Even heavy weed smokers will start pissing clean in 45 days.  Not too long in job search terms.
 
2014-06-18 01:29:35 PM  

cryinoutloud: Heims: This guy, GrendleMk1, worked 5 winters on a drilling rig and think he knows how thole whole oilpatch operates.
He was a seasonal employee, in one small area. Yes, it tends to be busier in the winter, but we're busy most of the rest of the year too.
No wonder he doesn't understand how the other facets work. Barely understands how drilling rigs work outside of northern BC.
Whether on a drilling rig or on a pumper, an hour drive from location to the hotel was average. 12 hr shift, + travel, + crossover/safety meeting .. 14 hours a day, easy.
And if you're travelling in a company truck, that's hours at work (as per every regulatory body involved).

My neighbor works in the oil fields, everywhere from Alaska to .....he just went to Wyoming. He doesn't get to live at home. He gets to come home when he's laid off. Then he gets another job, somewhere else, and he has to go there. I see him a few times a year.

Sounds exciting, right? Well, I've been living like that too for a couple of years, and I have to tell you: it sucks. Being a transient and living in temporary housing, or a camper, wears on you. To say nothing of the cost of maintaining your vehicle (which HAS to be running at all times), the gas, the hassle of finding a shower, a place to sleep, internet (because you're always looking for the next job)...
great fun when you're in your 20s. And it was too. Not so much fun now that I'm 30 years older.


That's one thing about the Canadian oil industry - the vast majority of it is within 2 days drive (says a lot that I'd consider that close).  Of course, I totally sold out and work for The Man, so all that stuff is taken care of for me.  I just go where I'm pointed and check the bank account on payday.
 
2014-06-18 01:32:02 PM  

TerminalEchoes: 1. Millennial
2. Hard work

Pick one of those.


Oh bullshiat. The problem is that the pay is a fraction of what you'd get from working in a construction trade. Compared to construction, the conditions are worse, and the work is harder and more dangerous than even the shiattier trades like roofing. You also can often spend half the year laid off. This can happen in construction, too, of course, but you'll have less cash on hand to tide you over if you were logging. You could just be a barista, instead. The worst thing that will happen is an occasional, mild burn, or perhaps somehow, a cut. At the end of the year, your bank account will look about the same as if you'd been working in the woods.
 
2014-06-18 01:53:14 PM  
Everyone that has died from my high school class was either developmentally disabled with major health issues or logging accidents. It's a great choice if you want to destroy yourself.
 
2014-06-18 02:30:04 PM  

Robo Beat: liam76: mschwenk: How is aircraft pilot and flight engineer #3

It isn't just commercial pilots.

But even with expiramental and "race" or stunt pilots that seems very high...

Crop dusting is fantastically dangerous.  IIRC, agricultural aviation is the most dangerous form of civilian flying because while your expenses depend on how long you're in the air, your revenue depends on how much field you spray.  So it involves executing a lot of very tight, low-altitude, low-airspeed turns at the end of each run to maximize the time you spend spraying chemicals, all while dodging things like power lines and trees.

I believe air ambulance helicopters were second on that list, because they're always flying in a great hurry (your passengers are generally dying, after all), and you're either landing at some ad-hoc site on the side of a road or whatever, or on a heliport on the roof of a building where there are lots of up- and downdrafts, crosswinds, swirling winds, etc.


Didn't event hink of those.

Great point man.
 
2014-06-18 10:17:11 PM  
Thanks, subby - this is only about the 800th time the ending of Dexter has been spoiled for me.

it would have been nice to wonder if he was going to die at the end as they reached the ending, but no - he just goes off and becomes a lumberjack because - I have no idea why, but the idea of watching the last couple of seasons has been shot down.

Actually, the main reason I don't watch the rest of them is I can't even really remember which season I stopped watching.
I don't have HBO anymore either.  I'm enjoying not reading any GoT threads, but I'm sure someone will spoil the ending in a subject line soon enough.
 
2014-06-19 01:31:10 PM  
I work for the largest lumber producer in the world. The workforce is aging like crazy, and there just aren't enough workers.

However, opposed to what a lot of people here are saying...wages have shot up. Right now, someone hired for clean up duty (pushing a broom, vacuuming dust) in a mill will start at $25 (Canadian) an hour with pension and benefits.
 
2014-06-19 01:59:18 PM  

Kickstart UF: I work for the largest lumber producer in the world. The workforce is aging like crazy, and there just aren't enough workers.

However, opposed to what a lot of people here are saying...wages have shot up. Right now, someone hired for clean up duty (pushing a broom, vacuuming dust) in a mill will start at $25 (Canadian) an hour with pension and benefits.


That's in the mill. What do they pay people who run chainsaws in the woods, though?
 
2014-06-19 02:20:16 PM  

forgotmydamnusername: Kickstart UF: I work for the largest lumber producer in the world. The workforce is aging like crazy, and there just aren't enough workers.

However, opposed to what a lot of people here are saying...wages have shot up. Right now, someone hired for clean up duty (pushing a broom, vacuuming dust) in a mill will start at $25 (Canadian) an hour with pension and benefits.

That's in the mill. What do they pay people who run chainsaws in the woods, though?


Very well. The lumber mill doesn't pay those guys generally though...that's the logging companies that are contracted to do it. Fallers make more money in general than mill workers, though there are always small logging firms that hire inexperienced people for cheap, pay them poorly, and don't care if they are kept safe. I know our company attempts to minimize the use of those companies. All the jobs in logging are extremely dangerous. I hear more about people getting hurt when the skidder rolls down a hill, or guys on ATVs going from jobsite to jobsite, than fallers getting crushed by a tree though.
 
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