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(Gizmodo)   Potential major advance in modern dentistry coming out of the UK   (gizmodo.com) divider line 40
    More: Unlikely, King's College London, tooth enamels, tooth decay, electric currents, University of Leeds  
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4910 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jun 2014 at 10:19 PM (19 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



40 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-17 07:41:01 PM  
They've discovered the toothbrush?
 
2014-06-17 08:15:34 PM  
Irony is a mineral too!!
 
2014-06-17 09:11:11 PM  
Well... that boiled food ain't gonna chew itself.
 
2014-06-17 09:51:49 PM  
Meh, every year someone makes claims, every year, nothing.

/human nature will always keep dentists in business.
 
2014-06-17 10:14:06 PM  
It's heartening to think that future generations may never know the exquisitely horrifying sound of a dental drill.

(shutter)
 
2014-06-17 10:17:48 PM  
This is based on the work of Professor Nigel B Pitts and Dr Chris Longbottom of Kings College in London.

Regardless of whether the future holds any promise for this, congratulations to both Professor Nigel B Pitts and Dr Chris Longbottom for having the most stereotypical British names since Benedict Cumberbatch...
 
2014-06-17 10:21:50 PM  
Floss ?
 
2014-06-17 10:22:04 PM  

IamKaiserSoze!!!: They've discovered the toothbrush?


But not the teethbrush. Yet.
 
2014-06-17 10:22:33 PM  

IamKaiserSoze!!!: They've discovered the toothbrush?


I was gonna go with, "A tourist left a toothbrush in their hotel room?"
 
2014-06-17 10:22:47 PM  
It's a man's life in the British Dental Association

31.media.tumblr.com
 
2014-06-17 10:22:48 PM  
i291.photobucket.com
 
2014-06-17 10:24:51 PM  
Good use of the Unlikely tag.
 
2014-06-17 10:24:58 PM  
What scares me is even though the British have horrible teeth, they still lead the world is the least number of fillings and dental work per person.
 
2014-06-17 10:29:19 PM  

limeyfellow: What scares me is even though the British have horrible teeth, they still lead the world is the least number of fillings and dental work per person.


It's almost like they all have health insurance or something.
 
2014-06-17 10:30:20 PM  
Or maybe, and this is just me spit-balling here, they could brush and floss, and get orthodontia where appropriate, and not have so many cavities in the first place.  I know it's crazy, but it just might be crazy enough to work.
 
2014-06-17 10:30:55 PM  
Waiting for the Simpsons Big Book of British Teeth.jpg ...
 
2014-06-17 10:31:23 PM  

limeyfellow: What scares me is even though the British have horrible teeth, they still lead the world is the least number of fillings and dental work per person.


I guess they chew minerals.
 
2014-06-17 10:31:58 PM  
And let's be fair. Americans don't have good teeth. They have lots of crowns. If you go somewhere the people can't afford crowns, you see funky teeth just like every other nation.
 
2014-06-17 10:32:59 PM  
www.dentalcaretoday.com.au
 
2014-06-17 10:36:01 PM  

limeyfellow: What scares me is even though the British have horrible teeth, they still lead the world is the least number of fillings and dental work per person.


I seem to recall reading somewhere, perhaps even here on Fark, that the Brits actually take care of the physical aspects of their teeth. They just don't care as much about aesthetics. So healthy teeth, just not pretty...
 
2014-06-17 10:36:31 PM  
There we go...

/can sleep now
//after I function check all the door and window locks
 
2014-06-17 10:49:36 PM  

jclaggett: I seem to recall reading somewhere, perhaps even here on Fark, that the Brits actually take care of the physical aspects of their teeth. They just don't care as much about aesthetics. So healthy teeth, just not pretty...


Add up the money me and my parents (let's face it, just my parents) spent on orthodontics versus actual dental work, and it's not even a contest.

/curious if braces and such are included in the british NHS or if it's out-of-pocket like any other cosmetic surgery.
//curious...yet too lazy to look it up
 
2014-06-17 10:49:49 PM  

Ambivalence: It's heartening to think that future generations may never know the exquisitely horrifying sound of a dental drill.

(shutter)


Did you mean shudder?
 
2014-06-17 10:56:44 PM  

Kevin72: Ambivalence: It's heartening to think that future generations may never know the exquisitely horrifying sound of a dental drill.

(shutter)

Did you mean shudder?


No he's closing the shutters so he can't hear the drills.
 
2014-06-17 11:02:40 PM  
Please Science let this be true!

/ Going in for part two of a deep clean next monday
 
2014-06-17 11:04:37 PM  
Carbide Tungsten dentures?
 
2014-06-17 11:30:57 PM  

Kevin72: Ambivalence: It's heartening to think that future generations may never know the exquisitely horrifying sound of a dental drill.

(shutter)

Did you mean shudder?


Yes, I did.  I even noticed the mistake as I hit "add comment" but didn't want to bring attention to it.  So thanks for that. :P
 
2014-06-17 11:39:17 PM  
thanks, Dr Lemming
 
2014-06-18 12:34:24 AM  
Makes sense, necessity is the abusive mother of invention and all that
 
2014-06-18 12:40:57 AM  
As someone who yesterday had ten teeth prepped for crowns with zero root canals being performed I'm getting a kick.
 
2014-06-18 01:25:51 AM  

frozenhotchocolate: As someone who yesterday had ten teeth prepped for crowns with zero root canals being performed I'm getting a kick.


10 crowns?  Sounds like you already got a kick in the teeth.
 
2014-06-18 01:28:09 AM  

frozenhotchocolate: As someone who yesterday had ten teeth prepped for crowns with zero root canals being performed I'm getting a kick.


What did I say?
 
2014-06-18 02:58:33 AM  
FTFA: Now if only there were something to protect us against crazy dentists.

Gizmodo can't possibly think I'm going to click on that.
 
2014-06-18 03:07:49 AM  
i90.photobucket.com

What an advance may look like
 
2014-06-18 06:42:10 AM  

dookdookdook: jclaggett: I seem to recall reading somewhere, perhaps even here on Fark, that the Brits actually take care of the physical aspects of their teeth. They just don't care as much about aesthetics. So healthy teeth, just not pretty...

Add up the money me and my parents (let's face it, just my parents) spent on orthodontics versus actual dental work, and it's not even a contest.

/curious if braces and such are included in the british NHS or if it's out-of-pocket like any other cosmetic surgery.
//curious...yet too lazy to look it up


My braces were covered by the NHS (after removing 4 teeth due to "overcrowding"), but it is when recommended by the dentist as necessary, so it is not treated as a purely a cosmetic procedure (given sufficiently crooked teeth can increase the risk of gum disease, etc.)


Obviously given everyone has access, perfectly straight and white teeth aren't the class marker in the UK that it is in the US, so there isn't the incentive to take it to the extremes middle class Americans tend to go to (particuarly with their kids).
 
2014-06-18 06:51:53 AM  

dookdookdook: jclaggett: I seem to recall reading somewhere, perhaps even here on Fark, that the Brits actually take care of the physical aspects of their teeth. They just don't care as much about aesthetics. So healthy teeth, just not pretty...

Add up the money me and my parents (let's face it, just my parents) spent on orthodontics versus actual dental work, and it's not even a contest.

/curious if braces and such are included in the british NHS or if it's out-of-pocket like any other cosmetic surgery.
//curious...yet too lazy to look it up


Orthodontic work is entirely covered up to the age of 18 for cases where it's judged there is a clinical need. For those over-18 or for whom orthodontic work is judged to be purely cosmetic there is no NHS support and you have to go private.

Dentistry as a whole isn't well-integrated into the NHS system. It's again free (at the point of need) up to 18 years, but check-ups and dental work after that age are subject to small charges, though still subsidised by the NHS. Most dentists are actually private practice but have contracts with the NHS to offer these subsidised services.

/That's right, 'whom'.
//Hello ladies.
 
2014-06-18 07:07:20 AM  

IamKaiserSoze!!!: They've discovered the toothbrush?


Well if it had originally been discovered somewhere besides West Virginia and called a teeth brush the brits may have found it sooner.
 
2014-06-18 11:39:05 AM  
I'm a dentist and hold a few advanced biology degrees to boot, no this won't work.  Once the ameloblast matrix is lost, it doesn't come back.  A tooth forms from the outside in.  About all this might do is occlude dentin, which would eliminate sensitivity, you still need a filling.
 
2014-06-18 11:42:14 AM  

Pocket_Fisherman: I'm a dentist and hold a few advanced biology degrees to boot, no this won't work.  Once the ameloblast matrix is lost, it doesn't come back.  A tooth forms from the outside in.  About all this might do is occlude dentin, which would eliminate sensitivity, you still need a filling.


But there's electricity involved! You know... like in the Frankenstein movies...
 
2014-06-18 04:16:07 PM  
But the article mentions the benefit of flouride!! That can't be right! I heard it from somewhere who studied next to no science at all that flouride was bought from the Chinese to make us all sterilley incompetent for our progeations!
 
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