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(The New Yorker)   After watching every minute of the 2010 World Cup, researchers counted 390 instances of cheating. Seems low   (newyorker.com) divider line 25
    More: Interesting, World Cup qualifiers, penalty kicks, Marco Materazzi, NCA, Cristiano Ronaldo, Zinedine Zidane, cheating, Sepp Blatter  
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937 clicks; posted to Sports » on 17 Jun 2014 at 1:49 PM (13 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-17 12:11:00 PM
I have a problem with calling it "cheating".

To me, it isn't outright cheating. Outright cheating would be using a player who had been red carded, or somehow using a 12th man on the field. Those aren't good examples because they are basically impossible, but I'm talking about flagrant and outright violation of stated rules.

Diving and trying to draw calls is technically a violation of the rules, but unlike my previous two examples where there is absolutely no gray area in whether a team is guilty or not, the referee must make a judgment call about whether a player truly was fouled or whether they were just trying to draw a call. It's just not the same to me.

Was Marco Materazzi "cheating" in World Cup 2006 when he was insulting Zidane in an attempt to get under his skin and incite a card?

I don't think you call that cheating.

Are players "cheating" when they grab a ball over the touch line, knowing full well the other team has the throw, and pitch the ball out of reach to buy a few seconds to get their teammates back into position?

I don't think you call that cheating.


It's playing within the confines of the game. Though I do agree something must be done about the really terrible dives.
 
2014-06-17 12:17:16 PM
After watching every minute of the 2010 World Cup, researchers counted 390 instances of cheating. Seems low 47,300,000,000 sheep
 
2014-06-17 02:00:53 PM
They should try doing this type of study on travelling in the NBA.
 
2014-06-17 02:02:52 PM
Is this only player cheating?  Or does it include FIFA itself too?

/buncha dingos
 
2014-06-17 02:12:44 PM
Of note, 139 of those incidents were done by Luis Suarez.
 
2014-06-17 02:13:35 PM
A conservative estimate of 10 penalties per game in the NFL playoffs would put the total of "cheating" instances at 110. When are they finally going to rein that crap in?
 
2014-06-17 02:14:47 PM
Pretty bogus study if you ask me.

390 instances of cheating in 64 games, three-quarters of which were professional/tactical fouls which most soccer players, referees and fans consider to be a normal part of the game. Usually those fouls result in yellow cards which can have a significant impact on the game. There were 241 yellow cards in the 2010 World Cup, and I bet three-quarters of those were for tactical fouls. It's quite common.

That leaves ~92 real instances of cheating in 64 games, or about 1.5 instances per game. I think that is not a large number even though zero is best.

The study didn't even mention how many cautions were given against players who were simulating fouls in the penalty area or committing other trickery. Referees do pay attention to diving, but are advised not to caution players unless the dive is made in the penalty area.

Lame study.
 
2014-06-17 02:15:07 PM

rjakobi: Of note, 139 of those incidents were done by Luis Suarez.


All of them on the bench.
 
2014-06-17 02:16:45 PM

Shame Us: A conservative estimate of 10 penalties per game in the NFL playoffs would put the total of "cheating" instances at 110. When are they finally going to rein that crap in?


How can they?  Soccer is an inexpensive sport (equipment wise) with a dynamic clock.  Perhaps they could review games and issue yellow cards after the fact, but that seems fraught with all sorts of other problems.  Maybe more refs, but the NBA still has all sorts of issues with multiple refs and subjective calls.

People knock American Football for being slow, but at least it is one of the more fair sports, what with replays and all.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-06-17 02:17:11 PM
Rev.K

Since the purpose of the game is to entertain fans, the fan poll provides a useful aid to distinguish "playing" from "cheating". Most fans disapprove of flopping, but think a handball to prevent a goal is an understandable tactic even though it's supposed to draw a red card.

In American football, compare pass interference on a wide open receiver to recording opponents' practice.  You're not supposed to do either. Fans disapprove of the latter much more than the former, and the league acted accordingly.
 
2014-06-17 02:24:15 PM

Rev.K: Are players "cheating" when they grab a ball over the touch line, knowing full well the other team has the throw, and pitch the ball out of reach to buy a few seconds to get their teammates back into position?

I don't think you call that cheating.


It's not cheating to knowingly and intentionally obstruct your opponents illegally in order to gain an advantage? Well, okay.
 
2014-06-17 02:25:35 PM
What did those poor researchers do to deserve such an inhumane fate as watching every single gd minute of the World Cup.  I hope they got something in return for their suffering.  Beer, pizza, blowjobs from the interns for life, as such.  My gawd.
 
2014-06-17 02:26:24 PM

StRalphTheLiar: They should try doing this type of study on travelling in the NBA.


img.fark.net
 
2014-06-17 02:27:27 PM

IAmRight: Rev.K: Are players "cheating" when they grab a ball over the touch line, knowing full well the other team has the throw, and pitch the ball out of reach to buy a few seconds to get their teammates back into position?

I don't think you call that cheating.

It's not cheating to knowingly and intentionally obstruct your opponents illegally in order to gain an advantage? Well, okay.


While technically you're right, everyone does it and cries bloody murder when their opponent does it. It is part of the game. In blatant circumstances (booting the ball into0 the stands after a foul, obviously holding the ball far too long, flinging the ball away after it goes out, etc.), it's often yellow carded.
 
2014-06-17 02:28:24 PM
Kuta: 390 instances of cheating in 64 games, three-quarters of which were professional/tactical fouls which most soccer players, referees and fans consider to be a normal part of the game. Usually those fouls result in yellow cards which can have a significant impact on the game. There were 241 yellow cards in the 2010 World Cup, and I bet three-quarters of those were for tactical fouls. It's quite common.

That leaves ~92 real instances of cheating in 64 games, or about 1.5 instances per game. I think that is not a large number even though zero is best.


Well, at least one of the red cards issued was an instance of real cheating, and not a professional foul. And the card wasn't issued to the guy who was cheating (See Kaka, Brazil vs. Ivory Coast http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u60GVxmcp6M). I'm guessing quite of few of the other yellow cards would be dives that the ref thought were professional fouls.
 
2014-06-17 02:45:47 PM
I'm surprised it's that low, honestly.  With all the grabbing, hooking, creating space with your arms, playing the body not the ball...i could go on.  FIFA has all these rules but only about 5 of them are ever called.
 
2014-06-17 02:50:10 PM
toetag: I'm surprised it's that low, honestly.  With all the grabbing, hooking, creating space with your arms, playing the body not the ball...i could go on.  FIFA has all these rules but only about 5 of them are ever called.

"flow of the game"
 
2014-06-17 03:00:44 PM

NeoCortex42: Is this only player cheating? Or does it include FIFA itself too?


How can FIFA cheat when the game is played on the field by the players?

Also, I find this report suspecious as it seems to imply the officials missed that many calls in so few games.  Seems unlikely.
 
2014-06-17 03:11:04 PM
That's even worse than the WWE!
 
2014-06-17 03:18:42 PM

Neeek: Kuta: 390 instances of cheating in 64 games, three-quarters of which were professional/tactical fouls which most soccer players, referees and fans consider to be a normal part of the game. Usually those fouls result in yellow cards which can have a significant impact on the game. There were 241 yellow cards in the 2010 World Cup, and I bet three-quarters of those were for tactical fouls. It's quite common.

That leaves ~92 real instances of cheating in 64 games, or about 1.5 instances per game. I think that is not a large number even though zero is best.

Well, at least one of the red cards issued was an instance of real cheating, and not a professional foul. And the card wasn't issued to the guy who was cheating (See Kaka, Brazil vs. Ivory Coast http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u60GVxmcp6M). I'm guessing quite of few of the other yellow cards would be dives that the ref thought were professional fouls.


I thought we went over this. Kaka was given a red card because HE CALLED HIMSELF KAKA! ON PURPOSE!
 
2014-06-17 03:43:26 PM
"Wait, what happened?" my wife asked, as we watched the replay once more. I found her incredulity touching. "Does that happen a lot?"

"awwww sweetums, where's my damn sandwich?"
 
2014-06-17 04:10:12 PM

IAmRight: Rev.K: Are players "cheating" when they grab a ball over the touch line, knowing full well the other team has the throw, and pitch the ball out of reach to buy a few seconds to get their teammates back into position?

I don't think you call that cheating.

It's not cheating to knowingly and intentionally obstruct your opponents illegally in order to gain an advantage? Well, okay.


The article didn't explain the distinction very well. A "professional foul" is a foul that everyone knows is a foul but is done for strategic reasons--because the violator has concluded that the benefit gained from the violation is greater than the penalty imposed. There is no attempt by the violator to deceive anyone; if the ref doesn't catch the violation that is good luck. On the other hand "classic cheating" is designed to deceive; it purpose is to trick the ref and if they get caught that's bad luck (or ineptitude).

Both can be thought of cheating in the sense that they both involve violations of the rules of the game. But classic cheating relies on deception to get its job done while a professional foul does not. In some people's eyes cheating is cheating but in other people's eyes deception based cheating is bad while the other is just smart playing.
 
2014-06-17 05:06:46 PM
Is it just me, or do they flop more in futbol than my dick after a pint of Jack?  Every tackle.  It's like they'd been hit with Ty Cobb's sharpened cleats.
 
2014-06-17 05:45:41 PM

hammettman: Is it just me, or do they flop more in futbol than my dick after a pint of Jack?  Every tackle.  It's like they'd been hit with Ty Cobb's sharpened cleats.


Warrior code.  You wouldn't understand.
 
2014-06-17 06:33:01 PM

rjakobi: Of note, 139 of those incidents were done by Luis Suarez.


Suarez also committed the smartest foul of the tournament. His handball was absolutely the right move.

It's something that's going to receive the harshest penalty in the game- ejection, disqualification for the next game, and a penalty kick. But, if you don't do it, there is no next game.

I will defend Suarez for that particular foul.
 
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