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(International Business Times)   Nest Labs overpriced smoke detector is back on the market, and will no longer set your house on fire   (ibtimes.com) divider line 37
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2686 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jun 2014 at 5:30 PM (27 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



37 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2014-06-17 10:54:35 AM  
What do you expect when you force Transformers to be smoke detectors?  They're probably unhappy and unsatisfied.
 
2014-06-17 02:53:20 PM  
Can I use it to build a nuclear reactor in my tool shed?
 
2014-06-17 04:55:58 PM  
no wave feature? that's the best part!

/cooks a lot
//searing meat
 
2014-06-17 05:34:54 PM  
I'm waiting for the "give it the finger" feature
 
2014-06-17 05:38:15 PM  
that nest crap is overpriced.
 
2014-06-17 05:43:25 PM  
It never set anything on fire, it just let you shut it up accidentally if someone else did.
 
2014-06-17 05:47:48 PM  
Being in hvac, I get a ligh outta the nest products... Overpriced gimmicky and wtf is the point?
 
2014-06-17 05:48:56 PM  
I don't know about this, but their thermostat is awesome.  And it's cut my energy usage by 40%.   Airwave seems to help a good bit.
 
2014-06-17 05:49:48 PM  
Simple programmable devices have been around a long time. They do the job well. The nest probably has little to no advantage. All of the marketing hype uses comparisons to a mercury switch thermostat that is never touched.
 
2014-06-17 05:50:02 PM  
Buy smoke detector that set home on fire but detects the smoke and saves your life to buy another smoke detector. Perfect marketing.
 
2014-06-17 05:50:51 PM  

Rev. Skarekroe: Can I use it to build a nuclear reactor in my tool shed?


Radioactive Boy scout?
 
2014-06-17 05:52:28 PM  
nest is all the proof you need that google isn't as smart as all that.
 
2014-06-17 05:53:41 PM  

alternaloser: nest is all the proof you need that google isn't as smart as all that.


Still smarter than Apple.

/Beats
 
2014-06-17 05:55:20 PM  
I know a lot about this product, and the wave feature was not faulty. It only temporarily disables the alarm, and was found that it could be inadvertently activated by walking under the unit. The difference with this company is that they're software developers who invented a stat and detector. I wouldn't use the stat, there are other ones that I prefer, but I like the detector.

/In HVAC for 25 years, currently technical advisor
 
2014-06-17 05:56:04 PM  

alternaloser: nest is all the proof you need that google isn't as smart as all that.


Google bought the company, they didn't invent or design anything.
 
2014-06-17 06:03:37 PM  

dpzum1: alternaloser: nest is all the proof you need that google isn't as smart as all that.

Google bought the company, they didn't invent or design anything.


yes, they spent billions on it...
 
2014-06-17 06:03:41 PM  
They don't need to design some fancy wave sensor feature to disable an accidental alarm.  It' just needs a 'off' button massive enough that a good jab with a broomstick when you're half drunk can reset the detector.  You know, for when you fall asleep on the crapper and accidentally burn your grilled cheese.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2014-06-17 06:07:23 PM  
Buy smoke detector that set home on fire but detects the smoke and saves your life to buy another smoke detector. Perfect marketing.

The other new marketing feature is a smoke detector that automatically self destructs so you have to buy a new one. It's explicit in the last detector manual I read: after 10 years of power on it will start chirping forever so you have to replace it. Planned obsolesence. It's the American way.
 
2014-06-17 06:10:50 PM  
I bought Nest thermostats for my house. They're neat little devices. I am moving soon though, and I doubt I'll be taking them with me when I sell my house. The software can be quirky and I never saw a real benefit to them. At least Google has $500+ of my money.
 
2014-06-17 06:12:34 PM  

Russ1642: Simple programmable devices have been around a long time. They do the job well. The nest probably has little to no advantage. All of the marketing hype uses comparisons to a mercury switch thermostat that is never touched.


1. Cool product comes out with great features...wait until there are cheap imitations.
2. Claim original product is overpriced and not special
3. profit??
 
2014-06-17 06:14:09 PM  

FlashHarry: no wave feature? that's the best part!

/cooks a lot
//searing meat


This.. I moved into a house in November and set off the standard smoke detector at least once a week, even if there is no really visible smoke. It is really sensitive or I need my eyes checked.

Got a Nest thermostat a few months ago and fairly happy with it so far. I wouldn't be against buying a Nest smoke alarm as well if it is smarter than my current one. Even without the 'wave' feature, it must have a way to disable accidental alarms? Also, if it can notify you that it is going off while you are not home would be great - I have pets and it is a worry that they would be trapped in the event something happened.
 
2014-06-17 06:14:22 PM  

Russ1642: Simple programmable devices have been around a long time. They do the job well. The nest probably has little to no advantage.


Talking about the thermostat, the ability to remotely turn off the AC and turn it back on 15 mins before I get home has been worth the cost of admission. I'm usually rushing out the door on the weekend and don't remember to set the T-stat to away, and even if I did then I'm facing a sweltering house when I get home. The Nest solves that problem nicely; if I'm running around for the 6 hottest hours of the day, my AC isn't wasting money keeping my couch cool. The motion sensor for occupancy is also pretty unusual and somewhat useful. I'm probably going to get a Nest Smoke Detector primarily for the additional occupancy sensor it provides for my thermostat.

For a $30-$40 premium (over an equivalent CO and photo smoke detector), the pricing is now actually pretty good.
 
2014-06-17 06:19:56 PM  

Rev. Skarekroe: Can I use it to build a nuclear reactor in my tool shed?


No, it uses an optical sensor to detect smoke.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoke_detector#Optical
 
2014-06-17 06:21:58 PM  
I think you misspelled Google.
 
2014-06-17 06:31:05 PM  
- Nest Protect's data suggests that at least one million households across the U.S., UK and Canada are exposed to high levels of carbon monoxide each year.

Good thing they used the "at least" qualifier. Their sample population is probably skewed toward the low end. Anyone able to pay $100 for a detector probably has the means to have their heating system properly serviced or rents a decent place. Anyone willing to buy one probably cares enough about such things to have the PM done.

"Our goal is that our groundbreaking research will help shed light on how actual CO events unfold. Because behind all the numbers are real people experiencing very real emergencies," the company said on its website.

"Unfold?" Something goes wrong with an appliance that uses combustion, and the CO level rises. Or sometimes an idiot runs his car in the garage. What kind of research could they be doing? I guess I don't see the value in this device. I don't need an update on my phone informing me that my house is on fire. If I'm not there, there's nothing I can do about it. The CO thing is slightly more useful; i could call someone to go get my dog. However, I'm fairly sure that one of my neighbors would hear my standard detector going off and investigate/call the fire department.
 
2014-06-17 06:38:16 PM  

Surpheon: Russ1642: Simple programmable devices have been around a long time. They do the job well. The nest probably has little to no advantage.

Talking about the thermostat, the ability to remotely turn off the AC and turn it back on 15 mins before I get home has been worth the cost of admission. I'm usually rushing out the door on the weekend and don't remember to set the T-stat to away, and even if I did then I'm facing a sweltering house when I get home. The Nest solves that problem nicely; if I'm running around for the 6 hottest hours of the day, my AC isn't wasting money keeping my couch cool. The motion sensor for occupancy is also pretty unusual and somewhat useful. I'm probably going to get a Nest Smoke Detector primarily for the additional occupancy sensor it provides for my thermostat.

For a $30-$40 premium (over an equivalent CO and photo smoke detector), the pricing is now actually pretty good.


Remote access isn't anythimg new either. Try again. I'm convinced the people who think the nest is new and innovative have been living in caves the last ten years ir so.
 
2014-06-17 06:59:02 PM  

Russ1642: Simple programmable devices have been around a long time. They do the job well. The nest probably has little to no advantage. All of the marketing hype uses comparisons to a mercury switch thermostat that is never touched.


Russ1642: Remote access isn't anythimg new either. Try again. I'm convinced the people who think the nest is new and innovative have been living in caves the last ten years ir so.


The "innovative" aspect of the Nest is it learns when you are away or not.   There was some study done that something like 90% of home programmable thermostats are not programmed, this solves that problem.  If you are good on programming your thermostat and you are really good about putting it to away when you are away then yes, this will be completely useless for you.  For the other 90% it farkING ROCKS!!

I think the only real feature left on the smoke detectors that is nice is that it helps the thermostat know when you are home or not.  Without the wave feature it is just an internet connected smoke/co detector.
 
2014-06-17 07:08:46 PM  

Russ1642: Surpheon: Russ1642: Simple programmable devices have been around a long time. They do the job well. The nest probably has little to no advantage.

Talking about the thermostat, the ability to remotely turn off the AC and turn it back on 15 mins before I get home has been worth the cost of admission. I'm usually rushing out the door on the weekend and don't remember to set the T-stat to away, and even if I did then I'm facing a sweltering house when I get home. The Nest solves that problem nicely; if I'm running around for the 6 hottest hours of the day, my AC isn't wasting money keeping my couch cool. The motion sensor for occupancy is also pretty unusual and somewhat useful. I'm probably going to get a Nest Smoke Detector primarily for the additional occupancy sensor it provides for my thermostat.

For a $30-$40 premium (over an equivalent CO and photo smoke detector), the pricing is now actually pretty good.

Remote access isn't anythimg new either. Try again. I'm convinced the people who think the nest is new and innovative have been living in caves the last ten years ir so.


Totally agree.  Its like someone decided they could make a better light bulb and thought "Hey I should use those newfangled LEDs" and then marketed the hell out of it.  Nothing Nest is doing hasn't been done before.  I prefer the control and features of the Honeywell units myself.  I would much rather input exactly what temperature I want at exactly the right time, rather than have the stupid controller try to figure out what I might prefer.
 
2014-06-17 07:28:03 PM  

Russ1642: Simple programmable devices have been around a long time. They do the job well. The nest probably has little to no advantage. All of the marketing hype uses comparisons to a mercury switch thermostat that is never touched.


What part of Honeywell do you work for?
 
2014-06-17 07:31:21 PM  

dj245: Nothing Nest is doing hasn't been done before.


This is bullshiat.

dj245: I prefer the control and features of the Honeywell units myself.


Up until I sold my house last year - I tried almost every Honeywell "smart" thermostat over the years.  They all sucked rocks.

dj245: rather than have the stupid controller try to figure out what I might prefer.


Oh - this explains it.  You've never actually used a Nest.

/should I get off your lawn too?
 
2014-06-17 07:44:35 PM  
my $15 smoke detector has a button i can push for when I'm cooking smoky foods. It disables the alarm for 15 mins.
 
2014-06-17 08:45:27 PM  
Probably best I don't have a snooze on my smoke detector cause I'm a snooze abuser
 
2014-06-18 12:57:15 AM  

dj245: Russ1642: Surpheon: Russ1642: Simple programmable devices have been around a long time. They do the job well. The nest probably has little to no advantage.

Talking about the thermostat, the ability to remotely turn off the AC and turn it back on 15 mins before I get home has been worth the cost of admission. I'm usually rushing out the door on the weekend and don't remember to set the T-stat to away, and even if I did then I'm facing a sweltering house when I get home. The Nest solves that problem nicely; if I'm running around for the 6 hottest hours of the day, my AC isn't wasting money keeping my couch cool. The motion sensor for occupancy is also pretty unusual and somewhat useful. I'm probably going to get a Nest Smoke Detector primarily for the additional occupancy sensor it provides for my thermostat.

For a $30-$40 premium (over an equivalent CO and photo smoke detector), the pricing is now actually pretty good.

Remote access isn't anythimg new either. Try again. I'm convinced the people who think the nest is new and innovative have been living in caves the last ten years ir so.

Totally agree.  Its like someone decided they could make a better light bulb and thought "Hey I should use those newfangled LEDs" and then marketed the hell out of it.  Nothing Nest is doing hasn't been done before.  I prefer the control and features of the Honeywell units myself.  I would much rather input exactly what temperature I want at exactly the right time, rather than have the stupid controller try to figure out what I might prefer.


I can tell you haven't actually used a Nest. You can indeed set the temperature you want at exactly the time you want. It's quite a nice web interface for manually setting your schedule to whatever you want.

My only complaint about my nest is that when my brother in law house sits for us, there's no way to let him set his own temporary schedule, or just put it on hold at a certain temp. Other than that, I'd say it's fine. I really do like the web interface and the iPhone app though. I haven't tried any other brands of "smart" thermostats to compare though, I went from a 7 day programmable to Nest.
 
2014-06-18 08:08:10 AM  
There are two things I would like to see from Nest:  Integrated radiator control valves and IR transmitters for controlling window/wall AC units.  I know Honeywell just released a smart thermostat with the control valves, but I haven't seen one that will control the AC units as well.
 
2014-06-18 08:10:03 AM  
Also, I think the Nest Detect is worth every bit of $99 if I never have to wake up to a low battery chirp at 4 in the morning and spend the next two hours trying to figure out which damned detector is making the noise once every 5 minutes.
 
2014-06-18 11:30:45 AM  
"The company also released a white paper on carbon monoxide based on data collected by Nest Protect smoke alarms installed in consumers' homes."

Does that say 'data collected' ?!

"forcing Nest to issue an over-the-air update"

So the smoke detectors are hackable?
 
2014-06-18 02:23:18 PM  
CSB:  My brother was awakened late one night by his smoke detector going off.  When he investigated, he found out that the detector itself was on fire.

/One of those permanently wired models.
//At least the damned thing went off!
 
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