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(CBS News)   Why are glasses so expensive? And how is that Laissez Faire thing working out for you?   (cbsnews.com) divider line 104
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3426 clicks; posted to Business » on 16 Jun 2014 at 12:02 PM (6 weeks ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2014-06-16 09:34:32 AM
How is that not a monopoly?  What about the anti-trust regulations involved in forcing competitors to either do business the Luxotica way or be assimilated?
 
2014-06-16 10:42:22 AM
I've got a handful of RayBans and Armani frames left on the boards. Once they've sold, I'll be completely Luxottica free.
 
2014-06-16 11:22:38 AM
I've been buying my glasses at zennioptical.com.  They usually run me between 12 and 20 dollars.  Tinting is an extra 5 bucks.
 
2014-06-16 11:28:29 AM
...you could easily be spending hundreds and hundreds of dollars for a pair that cost just $30 15 years ago.

15 years ago, a $30 pair of glasses would either have been a pair of cheap, non-prescription sunglasses or an *incredibly* cheap pair of clear, basic Rx (you +4.00's and -8.00's need not apply), single vision glasses. If you could wear them for more than a few hours without a headache, or a month before they fell apart, you were way ahead of the curve. Those glasses still exist. Sure, they're in the $50-90 price range now, but not "hundreds and hundreds of dollars".

The ones that cost hundreds and hundreds today, weren't $30 back then. I charge $99 for basic single vision lenses. I have for nearly 20 years now (they were $89 before that). I have decent quality frames for $150-180. A similar frame would have cost maybe $30 less back then. So, that's $229-259 then versus $249-279 now.


And it's not as though things have changed that much: they're still made of a couple of pieces of plastic or wire, some screws and glass.

Things have changed a lot. Titanium, stainless steel, spring hinges, layered plastic frames, A/R treatments, photochromics. And there are very few lenses made from glass anymore (even 15 years ago, it was rare). If you come to me and ask for glass, I'm going to spend a half an hour trying to talk you out of it. Even the way we manufacture lenses has changed, and is more expensive. Gone are the days of simply grabbing a negative and grinding the lens against it to make an Rx. It's all digital lathes now. It makes for a more accurate and customizable lens, but it's more expensive.


Which he says is why glasses in general cost so much, even at your local optician's.

Glasses cost so much more than the raw materials for the same reason that a custom piece of furniture costs so much more than a pile of wood and nails. That is, you're not buying raw materials, you're buying a finished, custom-made product. I just bought (literally, the install finished up on Friday) a new piece of equipment that allows me to take the raw materials and craft them into a finished pair of glasses. I got it on sale for $120K. The very skilled guy who runs it has been honing his craft for over a decade. That kind of skilled labor doesn't come cheap. Neither does the skill the guy out front has who made sure you picked out a frame that both fits your and your Rx's needs and wants and who then took the very precise measurements to give to the guy in back and who will also make sure that at delivery the glasses are adjusted and fitting you properly to make sure that you'll be able to see as well and as comfortably as possible in your new glasses.

You want cheap glasses? You can get them. Try America's Best. They usually have some "Two Pair for $100" or glasses and an exam for $79" special going on. (I just checked, you can get two pair and an exam for $69.95). Just don't expect that "Made in China" frame that cost America's Best less than a dollar, to ever hold its adjustment or last more than a year before it falls apart. Also, the cheap lenses they got for two dollars were made in a facility that only has one interest: speed. They literally do not care if they are the right prescription, or the right PD, or too small so that they keep falling out, or too big so that the frame is contorted. Thick and heavy? Don't care. Adjustments? HA! You'll have the receptionist hand you the glasses and bid you a good day. If you ask, they'll probably tell you to come see me. Saves them money. Costs me.

But hey, you showed the man and got 'Cheap glasses'!
 
2014-06-16 11:29:39 AM

Gecko Gingrich: I've got a handful of RayBans and Armani frames left on the boards. Once they've sold, I'll be completely Luxottica free.


Dang.  They make a lot of the brands I like to wear.
 
2014-06-16 11:31:23 AM

question_dj: Dang. They make a lot of the brands[full stop].

 
2014-06-16 11:33:53 AM

Gecko Gingrich: question_dj: Dang. They make a lot of the brands[full stop].


Most of the brands they make, I have destroyed in some way, within a few years.  The Modo frames I'm currently wearing, while the finish is chipping off, they've been almost indestructible.  I've never had a problem with them.  My Polo or Armani frames on the other hand, I've had issues with them breaking, screws coming loose, posts bending/breaking.  It's frustrating.

Now, what I really want to know is, who makes the best lenses?
 
2014-06-16 11:35:18 AM
Luxottica(Lenscrafters) does not make high quality lenses. The ABBE value of their products are abysmal. Their stores don't use Trivex, Spectralite, or any other decent material.
 
2014-06-16 11:46:15 AM

question_dj: Now, what I really want to know is, who makes the best lenses?


There is no one answer for that. What's your Rx? What are you going to be using them for? Single vision? Lined Bi/tri-focal? Progressive/"no line"/invisible? Sunglasses? A/R? Photochromic? What frame?

For progressives and A/R, I like Essilor and Hoya and I dislike Zeiss and Rodenstock. For single vision, it depends a bit on your script and the frame, but Essilor and Hoya again mostly because their A/R's are the best, the actual plastic underneath is fairly even across all manufactures. If you want photochromic, you want Transitions (owned by Essilor, but licensed to just about eveyone).

I don't have a "one size fits all" answer. There are too many factors to take into account. About the only hard and fast rule I've got is: don't use polycarbonate, unless there literally isn't any other choice. Optically, it's horrible. If you need impact resistant lenses, get Trivex. It's better optically, more impact resistant and about the same price as poly.

Also, spend the extra cash and make sure you get a high quality A/R. If the full price is less than $150, it's not high quality. If it's from Zeiss, it's not high quality. Get Crizal Avance or Super Hi-Vision. There are more expensive options, but they aren't worth the extra money.
 
2014-06-16 11:46:51 AM

InterruptingQuirk: Luxottica(Lenscrafters) does not make high quality lenses. The ABBE value of their products are abysmal. Their stores don't use Trivex, Spectralite, or any other decent material.


Featherweights! Featherweights for all!
 
2014-06-16 11:51:28 AM

Gecko Gingrich: question_dj: Now, what I really want to know is, who makes the best lenses?

There is no one answer for that. What's your Rx? What are you going to be using them for? Single vision? Lined Bi/tri-focal? Progressive/"no line"/invisible? Sunglasses? A/R? Photochromic? What frame?

For progressives and A/R, I like Essilor and Hoya and I dislike Zeiss and Rodenstock. For single vision, it depends a bit on your script and the frame, but Essilor and Hoya again mostly because their A/R's are the best, the actual plastic underneath is fairly even across all manufactures. If you want photochromic, you want Transitions (owned by Essilor, but licensed to just about eveyone).

I don't have a "one size fits all" answer. There are too many factors to take into account. About the only hard and fast rule I've got is: don't use polycarbonate, unless there literally isn't any other choice. Optically, it's horrible. If you need impact resistant lenses, get Trivex. It's better optically, more impact resistant and about the same price as poly.

Also, spend the extra cash and make sure you get a high quality A/R. If the full price is less than $150, it's not high quality. If it's from Zeiss, it's not high quality. Get Crizal Avance or Super Hi-Vision. There are more expensive options, but they aren't worth the extra money.


I've got single vision lenses, -3.75 ish with astigmatism in my left eye.  I think the lenses I currently have are Crizal in all my frames.  Once I discovered that spending a bit more on lenses provided way better results, I started dishing out the money.  Good to know that my eye care professional is getting me setup with the good shiat.

I have been thinking about buying a pair of "outdoorsy" frames and getting photochromic lenses, because I have gotten tired of wearing contacts in order to wear sunglasses.
 
2014-06-16 11:57:41 AM

Rustico: I've been buying my glasses at zennioptical.com.  They usually run me between 12 and 20 dollars.  Tinting is an extra 5 bucks.


Same here. I'll order a few pairs 2 or 3 times a year. On average, 1 out of 3 isn't quite right. I donate those to the Lion's Club, and still feel like I'm getting a good deal, because I still have 2 pair that I paid $30 for, total.

I have formal glasses, I have casual glasses, and, most importantly, I have 3 different styles and tints of prescription sunglasses. Love me some Zenni.
 
2014-06-16 12:06:22 PM

question_dj: I've got single vision lenses, -3.75 ish with astigmatism in my left eye.


You likely want a high-index lens then. I'll leave the final decision between you and your optician, but assuming your astigmatism isn't -2.00 or more and you don't want a giant frame or a pair to wear at the shooting range, I'd likely go with 1.60 index. The actual manufacturer will be determined by the A/R (Essilor for Crizal, Hoya for Super Hi-Vision).

question_dj: I think the lenses I currently have are Crizal in all my frames.


Sounds like you've found a decent shop, then.


question_dj: Once I discovered that spending a bit more on lenses provided way better results, I started dishing out the money.


Funny how that works, isn't it? ;)

question_dj: Good to know that my eye care professional is getting me setup with the good shiat.


Yup. see: above

question_dj: I have been thinking about buying a pair of "outdoorsy" frames and getting photochromic lenses, because I have gotten tired of wearing contacts in order to wear sunglasses.


Photochromics are great, if you go into them - if you'll pardon the pun - with eyes wide open. If you're a walker, a biker, a gardener, an "outdoorsy" person, then you'll like them. They do take a few minutes to change in either direction, though. So, when you walk indoors, you're going to be wearing sunglasses for the first minute or two. Similarly, when you walk outdoors, you're not going to be wearing sunglasses for a minute or two.

They do not change in the car. At all. They need UV to activate. The steel and glass surrounding you blocks UV.

Though they offer a polaroid version, it always has a bit of tint to it, and even when dark, the polarization isn't as good as a fixed tint pair of sunglasses.

They do block the UV whether clear or dark, but assuming you have any other plastic beside "regular" (which I assume you do, given your Rx), you're getting that protection anyway.

In short, they work very well for their intended purpose, that is, to supplement a pair of clear glasses. They are not designed to replace a pair of fixed tint sunglasses.
 
2014-06-16 12:11:08 PM

Gecko Gingrich: the polarization isn't as good as a fixed tint pair of polarized sunglasses.

 
2014-06-16 12:11:42 PM
Why are they so expensive? Because people will pay it.  It's that simple.
"Special" people will even generate their own reasons why they need them, or why they are better, or why they are worth the money.
Like fanboys of anything.

I say good for the company.  If the people are willing to pay the cash, then why not ask for it?
 
2014-06-16 12:13:45 PM
This is exactly what a "free market" creates.  One big player with massive amounts of cash and market influence basically is able to push everyone else out, then raise prices on everything.

Anytime a new start-up comes in and under-sells them, the big player just buys them out and goes right along.

There is only one way to prevent it - regulation.  Without government setting the rules of the game, nobody is there to prevent the game from being rigged.
 
2014-06-16 12:14:30 PM
Gecko Gingrich:

Fascinating insights. Thanks for contributing. Where are you located?

I play golf with my eye doctor. He's a Berkeley grad and has been a doctor longer than I've been driving a car. Really good guy. My insurance covers it, so I buy one decent-priced pair from him, then take his Rx and buy online. He's checked the glasses I get and OK'd them, so I'm comfortable with what I'm getting online.

Also, my Rx is very light and I only need it for reading. At 48+ years, my eyes are doing pretty well.
 
2014-06-16 12:15:43 PM

Rustico: I've been buying my glasses at zennioptical.com.  They usually run me between 12 and 20 dollars.  Tinting is an extra 5 bucks.


This, so much this.
 
2014-06-16 12:16:25 PM

ds615: Why are they so expensive? Because people will pay it.  It's that simple.
"Special" people will even generate their own reasons why they need them, or why they are better, or why they are worth the money.
Like fanboys of anything.

I say good for the company.  If the people are willing to pay the cash, then why not ask for it?


There's a reason why this costs more than this. And it ain't all "fanboys" and "because fark you, that's why".
 
2014-06-16 12:18:22 PM

Rustico: Fascinating insights. Thanks for contributing. Where are you located?


Thanks, and you're welcome. My shop's in Annapolis, MD.
 
2014-06-16 12:20:31 PM
Gecko Gingrich, any thoughts on the shape of the frames effecting the lens performance?  I like frames that are as round as possible but the lenses keep rotating no matter what I do.  I've thought about going to octagonal frames but can't find any that are 38mm.
 
2014-06-16 12:26:40 PM

Rustico: I've been buying my glasses at zennioptical.com.  They usually run me between 12 and 20 dollars.  Tinting is an extra 5 bucks.


THIS^^^^!!!! I love zenni! Just got polarized bifocal sunglasses in an awesome frame for $69 plus $8.95 shipping. Script is perfect, fit is great and they arrived in 8 days. The local stores wanted $200 and up for the exact glasses.
 
2014-06-16 12:29:07 PM
Considering what hearing aids have set me back over a lifetime, and then including what batteries cost every week, I don't want to hear your biatching over a couple hundred dollars. STFU and be grateful.
 
2014-06-16 12:31:11 PM
So the mob runs the eyewear industry
 
2014-06-16 12:31:40 PM

Smeggy Smurf: Gecko Gingrich, any thoughts on the shape of the frames effecting the lens performance?  I like frames that are as round as possible but the lenses keep rotating no matter what I do.  I've thought about going to octagonal frames but can't find any that are 38mm.


Shape, has little to no affect on glasses performance, with one or two caveats. Multifocals, progressives especially, need a certain amount of depth to function. And if you are looking over, under or around the lens, it's obviously not doing its job. Shape can drastically effect edge thickness and weight though. Besides the obvious, bigger equals thicker and heavier, corners also equal thicker and heavier. If you have a particularity strong Rx, a smaller, "softer" shape would be the best way to keep it light and aesthetically pleasing.

If made correctly, even perfectly round lenses shouldn't rotate. But 38mm?! Dafuaque you want something that small for?
 
2014-06-16 12:33:49 PM
Expensive? I regularly see commercials advertising eyeglasses for under $100, including the cost of the exam. Seems pretty reasonable to me.
 
2014-06-16 12:34:16 PM

Gecko Gingrich: If made correctly, even perfectly round lenses shouldn't rotate. But 38mm?! Dafuaque you want something that small for?


Oh, and if you want a specific shape/size, rimless is the way to go. With no frame dictating the shape, anything goes (within reason).
 
2014-06-16 12:34:25 PM

Gecko Gingrich: ...you could easily be spending hundreds and hundreds of dollars for a pair that cost just $30 15 years ago.

15 years ago, a $30 pair of glasses would either have been a pair of cheap, non-prescription sunglasses or an *incredibly* cheap pair of clear, basic Rx (you +4.00's and -8.00's need not apply), single vision glasses. If you could wear them for more than a few hours without a headache, or a month before they fell apart, you were way ahead of the curve. Those glasses still exist. Sure, they're in the $50-90 price range now, but not "hundreds and hundreds of dollars".

The ones that cost hundreds and hundreds today, weren't $30 back then. I charge $99 for basic single vision lenses. I have for nearly 20 years now (they were $89 before that). I have decent quality frames for $150-180. A similar frame would have cost maybe $30 less back then. So, that's $229-259 then versus $249-279 now.


And it's not as though things have changed that much: they're still made of a couple of pieces of plastic or wire, some screws and glass.

Things have changed a lot. Titanium, stainless steel, spring hinges, layered plastic frames, A/R treatments, photochromics. And there are very few lenses made from glass anymore (even 15 years ago, it was rare). If you come to me and ask for glass, I'm going to spend a half an hour trying to talk you out of it. Even the way we manufacture lenses has changed, and is more expensive. Gone are the days of simply grabbing a negative and grinding the lens against it to make an Rx. It's all digital lathes now. It makes for a more accurate and customizable lens, but it's more expensive.


Which he says is why glasses in general cost so much, even at your local optician's.

Glasses cost so much more than the raw materials for the same reason that a custom piece of furniture costs so much more than a pile of wood and nails. That is, you're not buying raw materials, you're buying a finished, custom-made product. I just bought (literally, the install f ...


So the machine what is it?


I assumes it's some sort of CNC?
 
2014-06-16 12:37:14 PM

BizarreMan: How is that not a monopoly?  What about the anti-trust regulations involved in forcing competitors to either do business the Luxotica way or be assimilated?


I agree for sure. Sounds like there is a huge market for someone to break in at the midrange though.

Lots of people don't want to "shop at Walmart" because of the perceived lack of quality.

Lots of people don't buy glasses regularly because paying more than $150 all in is basically retarded.

The $30 to $200 market is wide open.
 
2014-06-16 12:38:39 PM

loonatic112358: I assumes it's some sort of CNC?


'Tis.

loonatic112358: So the machine what is it?


Satisloh's ES-Curve. I'm pretty proud of the fact that we're the only retail establishment between New York and Florida has one. It's designed to go into those "speed" labs I talked about earlier, but if you slow it down from 1000 jobs/day to 15, it does an *incredibly* good job. Also, there used to be one subset of glasses (called shelf-bevel) that we had to send out. They would always come back with a "meh, good enough" seal of approval. Now, there is literally nothing I can't do in house.
 
2014-06-16 12:39:15 PM
I really dislike a lot of these Luxxotica frames.  I don't like labels, and Luxxotica loves to stamp PRADA/GUCCI/D&G in giant gold letters on its frames.  I've had 2 pairs of Dolce and 1 Prada where I was able to get a teeny-tiny logo.  The Pradas had a glue problem where they just fell apart after about a year.  The Dolces were always flimsy with hinges that liked to get bent.

My current pair are titanium Prodesign Denmark and while they make me look like a Swedish architect, I love the quality.  They haven't needed an adjustment in 2 years and they still fit perfectly.  I can't say enough good things about this brand.
 
2014-06-16 12:41:11 PM

Bullseyed: The $30 to $200 market is wide open.


The $30-200 market is the most flooded. As is always the case with a race to the bottom, it is also the one with the highest closure rate. About the only place in that price range that doesn't close within a year? Walmart.
 
2014-06-16 12:41:56 PM

Gecko Gingrich: Smeggy Smurf: Gecko Gingrich, any thoughts on the shape of the frames effecting the lens performance?  I like frames that are as round as possible but the lenses keep rotating no matter what I do.  I've thought about going to octagonal frames but can't find any that are 38mm.

Shape, has little to no affect on glasses performance, with one or two caveats. Multifocals, progressives especially, need a certain amount of depth to function. And if you are looking over, under or around the lens, it's obviously not doing its job. Shape can drastically effect edge thickness and weight though. Besides the obvious, bigger equals thicker and heavier, corners also equal thicker and heavier. If you have a particularity strong Rx, a smaller, "softer" shape would be the best way to keep it light and aesthetically pleasing.

If made correctly, even perfectly round lenses shouldn't rotate. But 38mm?! Dafuaque you want something that small for?


Without my glasses I can't see a damned thing.  A high prescription and severe astigmatism make for thick lenses no matter what.  38mm looks good on me and I like the reduced weight.

To give you an idea, the big E on the vision chart becomes slightly recognizable at about 3 feet.
 
2014-06-16 12:43:30 PM

Rustico: I've been buying my glasses at zennioptical.com.  They usually run me between 12 and 20 dollars.  Tinting is an extra 5 bucks.


How does that work with trying them on? I recall some site used to run ads on tv that you could pick like 10 frames to order to try on then ship them back after a day or two and decide.
 
2014-06-16 12:43:42 PM

Smeggy Smurf: To give you an idea, the big E on the vision chart becomes slightly recognizable at about 3 feet.


What's your Rx?
 
2014-06-16 12:47:07 PM

Gecko Gingrich: What's your Rx?


I mean seriously, your in kids (like *three* years old kids) sizes at 38mm. Unless your Rx is -25.00 -8.00 x 90 and you're stuck in some low-index plastic, there's no reason why you couldn't have a more appropriate size pair of glasses.
 
2014-06-16 12:47:25 PM

Gecko Gingrich: loonatic112358: I assumes it's some sort of CNC?

'Tis.

loonatic112358: So the machine what is it?

Satisloh's ES-Curve. I'm pretty proud of the fact that we're the only retail establishment between New York and Florida has one. It's designed to go into those "speed" labs I talked about earlier, but if you slow it down from 1000 jobs/day to 15, it does an *incredibly* good job. Also, there used to be one subset of glasses (called shelf-bevel) that we had to send out. They would always come back with a "meh, good enough" seal of approval. Now, there is literally nothing I can't do in house.


So I guess it has it's own program for building the code?


Played with edgecam years ago, obviously this is nothing like making an aluminum doohickey
 
2014-06-16 12:47:42 PM

Gecko Gingrich: your


you're

/d'oh!
 
2014-06-16 12:49:43 PM

question_dj: Gecko Gingrich: question_dj: Dang. They make a lot of the brands[full stop].

Most of the brands they make, I have destroyed in some way, within a few years.  The Modo frames I'm currently wearing, while the finish is chipping off, they've been almost indestructible.  I've never had a problem with them.  My Polo or Armani frames on the other hand, I've had issues with them breaking, screws coming loose, posts bending/breaking.  It's frustrating.

Now, what I really want to know is, who makes the best lenses?


I laid out almost $500 for my glasses, lenses with a Modo frame. The frame is holding up, though with the chipping you described. The lenses? Near crap. Never had this much trouble as with these. They are like grease and dust magnets. I believe I got them at a Lenscrafters.
 
2014-06-16 12:50:28 PM
Before I got my eyes lasered, I had a pair of Ralph Lauren frames that lasted over a decade.  They were bought around '96, when I was still in high school.  I never so much as tightened a screw on them in a decade.  I was used to frames falling apart every other year, and having to tighten them up constantly, so I loved those frames.  The lenses yellowed, though.

/csb
 
2014-06-16 12:50:46 PM
yes, i'll smug-brag about how i havent given them a dime in 20 years and will never do it again.  my late 90s early hipsterism had me hunting some horn-rims in vintage stores and saying no to 'brand names' (generally as whole for every purchase but certainly for eyeglasses).  then when they finally wore out (10 yrs later) and I was in eye stores looking for frames I saw the scam that it was.  i bought some frames off ebay for $25 bucks (china knockoffs probably--but still better than contributing to the 'legal' monopoly) and havent looked back.  im either only going to wear 2nd hand vintage or ebay cheap deals from here on out.

and dont say something like the vintage ones are probably Luxottica and im still contributing.  my money actually goes to some privately owned dime store or to some chinese off-market company.

/humble-smug-pretentious-brag indeed
//but im sticking to it
 
2014-06-16 12:52:25 PM
Astroturfing is a Religion.
 
2014-06-16 12:53:14 PM

loonatic112358: So I guess it has it's own program for building the code?


Played with edgecam years ago, obviously this is nothing like making an aluminum doohickey



It does, though its GUI makes it much easier to program. At the end of the day, it's just a milling machine and a 5-axis gimbal.
 
2014-06-16 12:53:44 PM
Too many business people (oh sorry, Stakeholders in The Enterprise) are shiate-spinning political snakes. They never admit publicly to the ground floor truth about anything.

it's like they all go to they same shiate school of never-in-the-wrong groupthink as the PRC.
 
2014-06-16 12:56:04 PM

cefm: his is exactly what a "free market" creates.  One big player with massive amounts of cash and market influence basically is able to push everyone else out, then raise prices on everything.


Really? Like those 3 different operating systems you can use, 3 different chip makers, half a dozen supermarkets, half a dozen major brands of beer.

In the UK you can still buy a £30 lenses and £30 frames. Specs in the UK are waaaaaay cheaper than 25 years ago when there was a cartel and people regularly spent £150+ on spectacles.
 
2014-06-16 12:56:59 PM

letrole: Astroturfing is a Religion.


I think you're lost, and you already shat in a religions thread today
 
2014-06-16 12:57:02 PM
my prescription sun glasses were  exspensive.  A polycarbonite progrssive bifocal lens, polarized and crizzal in a Tommy Bahama frame ran me over $500.  However I absolutely farking love them.  They are comfotrable, look sharp and are a pleasure to wear.   I don't know why I waited so long to get prescription sun glasses....I guess I figured they were a waste of money.
 
2014-06-16 12:58:34 PM
Re: ZenniOptical

I've checked here and a couple other online shops and unfortunately the frames are all terrible. Maybe women might be okay with some of the styles, but the men's frames just look like shiat.

I'd love to get away from dropping a few hundred dollars every year or two, but I now need a progressive lens and none of these online places are either able to produce a decent lens or give decent frame options.
 
2014-06-16 01:02:27 PM
Never has there been so much choice: Ray-Bans, Oakleys, glasses for running, and skiing, and even reading.


OH
     MY
           GOD.......................


How was I not notified of this? They have glasses for reading now? Reading? Jesus, do you realize the implications of this? We can finally read after our eyes go bad!!

Seriously, who the fark wrote this thing? Is it some farker's 8th grader?

And yeah, fark Luxottica. They are the reason that my Ray Bans went from 2 year full replacement warranty to something like 6 month pro-rated warranty. While I owned them. When I bought them, they had the original warranty, and then they refused to farking honor that warranty when they bought Ray Ban.

And TFA doesn't actually understand glasses, either. They're more than "...a couple of pieces of plastic or wire, some screws and glass.". That's fine if you want poorly ground shiat lenses that will give you headaches, or crappy frames that get bent out of shape constantly, but since I'm not the kind of moron that needs new sunglasses every year or two, the expensive ones don't set me back that much.
 
2014-06-16 01:02:51 PM

Gecko Gingrich: Smeggy Smurf: To give you an idea, the big E on the vision chart becomes slightly recognizable at about 3 feet.

What's your Rx?


I couldn't tell you off the top of my head.  It's bad enough that if I lose the little screws I can't seen them well enough to put them back in without putting on an older pair of glasses.  Yet it corrects to 20/20 easily enough once the techs get the lenses adjusted properly.
 
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